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Topic: Greek Dark Ages


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  Greek Dark Ages - Definition, explanation
1200 BC–800 BC) refers to the period of Greek prehistory from the presumed Dorian invasion and end of the Mycenaean civilization in the 11th century BC to the rise of the first Greek city-states in the 9th century BC and the epics of Homer and earliest writings in alphabetic Greek in the 8th century BC.
The Greeks of the dark age lived in fewer and smaller settlements, suggesting famine and depopulation, and foreign goods are not found, suggesting little international trade.
At the end of this period of stagnation the Greek civilization was engulfed in a renaissance that spread the Greek world as far as the Black Sea and Spain.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/g/gr/greek_dark_ages.php   (507 words)

  
 2. The Dark Ages, 1200-800 B.C.E. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
The Greek Dark Ages were characterized by a gradual, though severe, decline in material culture.
In both epics, the Mycenaean world and the Dark Ages are blended together, and it is difficult to distinguish the date of various elements of the poems.
In the Dark Ages, Greek states were considerably smaller and less wealthy than in Mycenaean times, though the basic unit is already the walled polis or city-state.
www.bartleby.com /67/173.html   (672 words)

  
  Ancient Greece - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
In the modern Greek school-books, "ancient times" is a period of about 1000 years (from the catastrophe of Mycenae until the conquest of the country by the Romans) that is divided in four periods, based on styles of art as much as culture and politics.
Greek culture was a powerful influence in the Roman Empire, which carried a version of it to many parts of Europe.
Marble statuette from the Cycladic islands, 3000 BC The Greeks are believed to have migrated southward into the Greek peninsula in several waves beginning in the late 3rd millennium BC, the last being the Dorian invasion.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/a/n/c/Ancient_Greece_e4c9.html   (3352 words)

  
  Greek Dark Ages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
1200 BC–800 BC) refers to the period of Greek prehistory from the presumed Dorian invasion and end of the Mycenaean civilization in the 11th century BC to the rise of the first Greek city-states in the 9th century BC and the epics of Homer and earliest writings in alphabetic Greek in the 8th century BC.
At the end of this period of stagnation, the Greek civilization was engulfed in a renaissance that spread the Greek world as far as the Black Sea and Spain.
Before this turbulent time, Myceneans were writing their Greek language in Linear B but after the Dark Ages when history was being recorded once again, we find this new alphabet, the more familiar alpha-beta-gamma.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Greek_Dark_Ages   (702 words)

  
 History of Greece - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Greek culture was a powerful influence in the Roman Empire, which carried a version of it to many parts of Europe.
The Hellenistic period of Greek history begins with the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and ends with the annexation of the Greek peninsula and islands by Rome in 146 BC.
After the gradual weakening of the structures of the Greek Byzantine state and the reduction of its land from Turkish invasions, came the fall of the Greek Byzantine Empire, at the hands of the Ottomans, in 1453, when the Byzantine period is considered to have ended.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/History_of_Greece   (6313 words)

  
 Greek Dark Ages Information
1200 BC–800 BC) refers to the period of Greek history from the presumed Dorian invasion and end of the Mycenaean civilization in the 11th century BC to the rise of the first Greek city-states in the 9th century BC and the epics of Homer and earliest writings in alphabetic Greek in the 8th century BC.
Before this turbulent time, Myceneans were writing their Greek language in Linear B but after the Dark Ages when history was being recorded once again, we find this new alphabet, the more familiar alpha-beta-gamma.
The dark age of Greece : an archaeological survey of the eleventh to the eighth centuries BC.
www.bookrags.com /Greek_dark_ages   (688 words)

  
 Greek Dark Ages: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Homer (greek hmros) was a legendary (or perhaps mythical) early greek poet and rhapsode...
The atomic age was a phrase used for a time in the 1950s in which it was believed that all power sources in the future would be atomic in nature....
The age of sail is the period in which international trade and naval warfare were both dominated by sailing ships....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/g/gr/greek_dark_ages.htm   (867 words)

  
 Ancient Greece History
This was followed by a period of wars and invasions, known as the Dark Ages.
The Mycenaean Age was cut short by widespread destruction ushering in the Greek Dark Age.
During the Archaic Age the Greeks developed the most widespread and influential of their new political forms, the city-state, or polis.
www.ancientgreece.com /history/history.htm   (599 words)

  
 Aegean civilization
The Dark Age of Greece and Homer (1150-800 BCE)—In the period from 1,100 B.C. to 750 B.C. Greece experienced a decline in government, economics and culture.
Intellectually and culturally the Greeks declined as they lost the ability to write in Linear B. The values of the Dark Age Greeks are reflected in the epic poems The Iliad and The Odyssey.
The Greek Dark Ages, circa 1100-725 B.C. This is the era from the fall of Mycenae to the rise of the Greek city-states.
faculty.ccri.edu /lemery/Aegean_civilization3.htm   (2453 words)

  
 Greek History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Greek life during the "Dark Ages" wasn't dark; it was, in fact, a culturally creative period.
In most Greek states, women were required to stay indoors at all times (though only the upper classes could afford to observe this custom); Spartan women, however, were free to move about, and had an unusual amount of domestic freedom for their husbands, after all, didn't live at home.
Macedon all during the age of the Greek city-states was an anomaly: it was a Greek kingdom.
www.stoneandspirit.com /greek/history_1.htm   (17742 words)

  
 Greek Dark Ages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The exploits of these heroes formed the three Greek "cycles": The Theban Cycle, supposedly occurring two generations before the Trojan War and concerning Oedipus and his family; the Cycle of Hercules and his sons, the Heraclidae; and, the Trojan Cycle, the war of the Achaeans against Troy, led by Agamemnon, Achilles, and Odysseus.
Greek tradition characterized this movement as the "return" of the sons of Heracles (Heraclidae): Hyllus, Dymas, and Pamphylas, who were the eponymous founders of the three Dorian tribes.
The Archaic Age and the Rise of the Polis (by John Porter)
idcs0100.lib.iup.edu /WestCivI/greek.htm   (974 words)

  
 Greek Dark Ages . Enpsychlopedia
1100 BC–750 BC) refers to the period of Greek history from the presumed Dorian invasion and end of the Mycenaean civilization in the 11th century BC to the rise of the first Greek city-states in the 9th century BC and the epics of Homer and earliest writings in alphabetic Greek in the 8th century BC.
On this reading, the collapse which resulted in the Greek Dark Ages is not due primarily to a Dorian invasion, but rather to environmental damage in the first, or a contributing, instance.
The oral tradition of the Greeks allowed much of the history and heritage to be passed down from one generation to another.
enpsychlopedia.org /psypsych/Greek_dark_ages   (1042 words)

  
 Barbarians and Bureaucrats: Minoa, Mycenae, and the Greek Dark Ages
Barbarians and Bureaucrats: Minoa, Mycenae, and the Greek Dark Ages
The Military States In Greece: Mycenae and the Dark Ages
A Glossary of Ancient Greek Terms and Concepts
www.wsu.edu:8080 /~dee/MINOA/MINOA.HTM   (36 words)

  
 The Myceneans
Later Greeks believed this to be the case: in Greek history and legend, the Dorians were a barbaric northern tribe of Greeks who rushed down into Greece and wrested control over the area.
Fortunately for the Greeks, none of the great powers had ever been interested in Europe or the Aegean, so the Greek Dark Ages, once the Dorians had settled, were probably a time of peace.
Not only are the two epic poems of Homer windows into the distant Mycenean past and into the darkness of the Greek Middle Ages, they are the defining moment in Greek culture; for the Greeks will turn to these poems throughout their history to define themselves culturally, politically, and historically.
www.wsu.edu:8080 /~dee/MINOA/DARKAGES.HTM   (493 words)

  
 Dark Ages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Here are intensive resources about all facets of the case of the Dark Ages, including history, advances in research, state of the knowledge on this subject.
Ages, even genders change as the play roller coasters bizarrely and unsettlingly from scene to scene, reflecting the...
La Crosse Tribune - Still living in the dark ages wrote: “It is utterly ridiculous for it to be illegal and categorized with cocaine, crack, heroin and meth, while alcohol and cigarettes are OK to use.” By the numbers A solid majority of the 1,011 people who took the...
psychicinvestigator.com /kw/dark-ages/dark-ages.php   (494 words)

  
 Articles - Ancient Greece   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
In the modern Greek school-books, "ancient times" is a period of about 1000 years (from the catastrophe of Mycenae until the conquest of the country by the Romans) that is divided in four periods, based on styles of art as much as culture and politics.
The Greeks are believed to have migrated southward into the Balkan peninsula in several waves beginning in the late 3rd millennium BC, the last being the Dorian invasion.
In Ionia (the modern Aegean coast of Turkey) the Greek cities, which included great centres such as Miletus and Halicarnassus, were unable to maintain their independence and came under the rule of the Persian Empire in the mid 6th century BC.
www.landize.com /articles/Ancient_Greece   (4281 words)

  
 Archaic Age and the Polis, Univ. of Sask.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Archaic Age and the Polis, Univ. of Sask.
Greek myth recalls the turbulent nature of these times in its stories of the woes of the Greek heroes on their return from Troy, but the principal cause of the differences between Bronze Age Greece and the Greece of Homer's day, according to tradition, was the so-called *Dorian Invasion.
Greek myth preserves a number of tales concerning this region (perhaps the distant echoes of stories told by the earliest Greeks to explore the area) in the legend of Jason and the Argonauts, who sail to Colchis (on the far eastern shores of the Black Sea) in search of the Golden Fleece.
duke.usask.ca /~porterj/CourseNotes/Polis.html   (3510 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Greek Dark Ages
The collapse of the Mycenaean coordinated with the fall of several other large empires in the near east, most notably the Hittite and the Egyptian.
The period that follows these events is collectively known as the Greek Dark Ages.
Writing was relearned from the Phoenicians, eventually spreading north into Italy and the Gauls.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Greek_Dark_Ages   (504 words)

  
 Greek Dark Ages
The downfall of the Mycenaean age came swiftly and was due to multiple causes.
What followed the initial invasion and rule of the Dorians and the Greek civil war, (within the years of 1200BC to 750BC) was a shift in lifestyle, centered around a moderately sedentary agricultural lifestyle.
However, though Greek civilization had hit its lowest point, the idle time of 450 years allowed the Greeks to rediscover urbanized culture, which in turn created the tales and cultures of Greece as they are classically and popularly known.
www.mnsu.edu /emuseum/prehistory/aegean/pre-greece/greekdarkages.html   (351 words)

  
 Ancient Greek Architecture - History for Kids!
In the Late Bronze Age, under the influence of Western Asia, and the Minoans on Crete, there are palaces and big stone tombs, as well as paved roads and bridges, and dams (and more stone walls).
During the Greek Dark Ages the palaces were burned, and the roads and bridges and dams mostly fell apart.
But at the end of the Dark Ages, with the beginning of the Iron Age and the Archaic period in Greece, we see a new type of building: the temple for the gods.
www.historyforkids.org /learn/greeks/architecture/greekarch.htm   (688 words)

  
 Greek Culture - Ancient Roman Empire Forums   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
The Greeks in the south differed from the Greeks in the north, and the Greek colonials in Asia Minor and Western Europe differed from those on the Greek mainland.
Greek culture was patriarchal in the extreme, with men and women leading largely separate lives, and with women often being confined to several rooms in the male’s residence.
The central religious idea of the Greeks was while the gods were much like humans in appearance and behavior, they were superior to humanity by virtue of their vast powers and immortality.
www.unrv.com /forum/lofiversion/index.php/t2054.html   (2294 words)

  
 The Polis
In the Mycenean age, the Greeks lived in small, war-oriented kingdoms, but for reasons unknown to us, they abandoned their cities and their kingdoms sometime between 1200 and 1100 BC.
The age of the city-state in Greece is an age of dynamic and continual experimentation with political structures; this period of experimentation gave the European world most of its available political structures.
The most common form of government in the Greek city-states was oligarchy, or "rule by a few." The oligarchs were almost always drawn from the noble classes or from the wealthiest citizens of the state ("rule by the wealthy" is called a timocracy), but a variety of oligarchic forms were invented in the eighth century.
www.sad17.k12.me.us /teachers/bburns/com/units/government/polis.htm   (1092 words)

  
 BEGINNINGS OF THE GREEKS
But the stories of the great Mycenaean age continued to be told - oral poets sung about the siege of Troy - creating stories which eventually will make their way into Homer's Iliad and Odyssey.
The Greek hoplites would form into a line - a phalanx, shoulder to shoulder, each holding a shield which would partly protect his neighbor, and thrust at the enemy with a spear.
The discipline and courage it took to withstand foreign cavalry on foot like this was significant, and the Greeks in the front row had a very good chance of dying.
www.luc.edu /faculty/ldossey/earlygreeks101h.htm   (1617 words)

  
 Dark Age Greece - History for Kids!
Because Greece was in such bad shape during the Dark Ages, and could not defend herself, it also seems that some of their neighbors to the north invaded Greece and began living in some of the Greek cities.
The Greeks called these invaders the Dorians (DOOR-ee-anns), and called the old Mycenean, Bronze Age Greeks the Ionians (i-OWN-ee-anns).
The Dark Age of Greece: An Archeological Survey of the Eleventh to the Eighth Centuries B.C., by Anthony Snodgrass (2000).
www.historyforkids.org /learn/greeks/history/darkages.htm   (687 words)

  
 Dark Ages
Lefkandi is considered an anomaly in Greek history not only because of the many foreign elements it reveals and incorporates, but because it shows remarkable wealth and organization at a time thought to be devoid of both.
Preceding the Dark Age were the highly organized and sophisticated palace cultures of the Minoans and Mycenaeans in southern Greece.
Prior to this discovery, Dark Age Greeks were thought to have been nearly completely isolated from contact outside their local communities.
faculty.vassar.edu /jolott/old_courses/crosscurrents2001/Lefkandi/darkages.htm   (2163 words)

  
 Greek Poleis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
At the end of the Greek Dark Ages the polis was already a dominant institution in parts of the Greek world.
Greek states therefore composed a myriad of different political, social, economic, and cultural enities.
The difficulties of the Greek poleis to unite for any lengthily period played a significant factor in the unfolding of Greek history.
idcs0100.lib.iup.edu /AncGreece/thepolis.htm   (584 words)

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