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Topic: Greek Alphabet


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In the News (Tue 23 Apr 19)

  
  Greek Alphabet, Greek Letter and Greek Language
The Greeks were the first Europeans to learn to write with an alphabet, and from them writing was brought to the rest of Europe, eventually leading down to all modern European alphabets.
The Greeks of the eighth century BC were entirely unaware that five centuries earlier, their ancestors in the Mycenaean civilisation had written the Greek language in a script now known as Linear B. This script, finally deciphered in 1952, consisted of symbols representing whole syllables at once.
Eventually the Ionian alphabet was adopted in all Greek-speaking states, but before that happened, the Euboean variant was carried to the Italic peninsula and adopted by Etruscan and eventually the Romans.
www.greece.com /information/aphabet/greek_alphabet.html   (363 words)

  
  Greek alphabet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Besides writing modern Greek, today its letters are used as symbols in mathematics and science, particle names in physics, as names of stars, in the names of fraternities and sororities, in the naming of supernumerary tropical cyclones, and for other purposes.
The Greek alphabet originated as a modification of the Phoenician alphabet and in turn gave rise to the Gothic, Glagolitic, Cyrillic, Coptic, and possibly the Armenian alphabets, as well as the Latin alphabet, as documented in History of the alphabet.
The Greek alphabet is unrelated to Linear B and the Cypriot syllabary, earlier writing systems for Greek.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Greek_alphabet   (1892 words)

  
 Greek language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Greek has been written in the Greek alphabet (the first to introduce vowels), since the 9th century BC in Greece (before that in Linear B), and the 4th century BC in Cyprus (before that in Cypriot syllabary).
The later Greek alphabet is unrelated to Linear B, and is believed to be derived from the Phoenician alphabet (abjad); with minor modifications, it is still used today.
Medieval Greek: The continuation of Hellenistic Greek during medieval Greek history as the official and vernacular (if not the literary nor the ecclesiastic) language of the Byzantine Empire, and continued to be used until, and after the fall of that Empire in the 15th century.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Greek_language   (2500 words)

  
 Greek alphabet -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Historically, the Greek alphabet emerged several centuries after the die out of Linear B script, an early Greek writing system, and the fall of Mycenaean civilisation.
The most notable change in the Greek alphabet, as an adaptation of the Phoenician alphabet, is the introduction of written vowels, without which Greek — unlike Phoenician — would be unintelligible.
The Coptic alphabet is the Greek alphabet augmented with several new letters.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/Greek_alphabet   (1845 words)

  
 The Greek Alphabet
This table gives the Greek letters, their names, equivalent English letters, and tips for pronouncing those letters which are pronounced differently from the equivalent English letters.
In either case, you are going to have to learn the order of the Greek alphabet.
The Erasmian pronunciation is probably different from the way Greek was pronounced at the time of the New Testament, but it is widespread among scholars, and it has the advantage that every letter is pronounced, which makes it easy to grasp the spelling of words.
www.ibiblio.org /koine/greek/lessons/alphabet.html   (900 words)

  
 Greek Terminology and Alphabet, the Polis, Fraternities and Sororities at the University of South Florida, Tampa
Greek Terminology and Alphabet, the Polis, Fraternities and Sororities at the University of South Florida, Tampa
This site will look much better in a browser that supports web standards, but it is accessible to any browser or Internet device.
greek - a member of a fraternity or sorority
ctr.usf.edu /polis/speak.html   (394 words)

  
 Ancient Scripts: Greek
The Greeks were the first Europeans to learn to write with an alphabet, and from them writing was brought to the rest of Europe, eventually leading down to all modern European alphabets.
From the shape of the letters, it is clear that the Greeks adopted the alphabet the Phoenician script, mostly like during the late 9th century BCE.
Eventually the Ionian alphabet was adopted in all Greek-speaking states, but before that happened, the Euboean variant was carried to the Italic peninsula and adopted by Etruscan and eventually the Romans.
www.ancientscripts.com /greek.html   (489 words)

  
 EDSITEment - Lesson Plan
Greek Alphabet Activity: Begin the lesson on the Greek Alphabet by asking the students if they still remember the Phoenician traders who were trading purple cloth for olive oil at Athens.
In the Greek alphabet Z was in the middle of the alphabet instead of at the end.
The fact that the Greeks changed the Phoenician alphabet, or that the Romans changed the Greek alphabet, does not mean that either one was deficient, but only that each subsequent group needed to change the letters to accommodate their language and culture.
edsitement.neh.gov /view_lesson_plan.asp?id=519   (1942 words)

  
 Greek alphabet, pronunciation and language
It was developed from the Canaanite/Phoenician alphabet and the order and names of the letters are derived from Phoenician.
The blue group developed into the modern Greek alphabet, while the red group developed into the Etruscan alphabet, other alphabets of ancient Italy and eventually the Latin alphabet.
The capital letters of the modern Greek alphabet are almost identical to those of the Ionic alphabet.
www.omniglot.com /writing/greek.htm   (780 words)

  
 Ancient Greek Language
One theory suggests that it originated with a migration of proto-Greek speakers into the Greek peninsula, which is dated to any period between 2500 BC and 1700 BC.
Doric was standard for Greek lyric poetry, such as Pindar and the choral odes of the Greek tragedians.
Attic Greek - a subdialect of Ionic, was for centuries the language of Athens.
www.crystalinks.com /greeklanguage.html   (302 words)

  
 Greek Alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Some time in the 10th century (perhaps?) the Greeks adopted the Phoenician alphabet, with modifications, and our earliest writing with the Greek alphabet comes from the last half of the 8th century.
The Greek of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey (and other early works) has certain features that disappear in later Greek - for instance the "w" sound (the letter was called a digamma), the tolerance for "open" vowels (two vowels next to each other that don't contract), and a long alpha (a) in many forms.
In Attic Greek the long alpha of the early period has turned into a long eta (e) except after a short e (epsilon), iota (i), or rho (r), and in Ionic the eta has replaced the alpha altogether.
www.uncg.edu /cla/courses/shelmerd/grkalpha.htm   (332 words)

  
 THE GREEK ALPHABET   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Greek alphabet was derived from the Phoenician alphabet, as was Hebrew.
The Phoenician alphabet was widely received, as it was only 22 letters based on sound, as opposed to the myriad of symbols in cuneiform and hieroglyphics prevalent at the time.
The Greek on the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea was heavily interpenetrated by native Semitic languages, such as Aramaic and Hebrew.
biblescripture.net /Greek.html   (1027 words)

  
 Greek alphabet was in use at 6000 BC   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Greek alphabet was in use at 6000 BC Greek alphabet was in use at 6000 BC An article by Pan.Kouvalakis published in "Davlos" magazine
After the discovery of a wooden plate at Dispilion Kastorias, which was dated at 5300 BC, a new impressive discovery came to light, concerning the "prehistorical" alphabet in the Greek region.
These tremendously important finds justify the historic and linguistic view of the simultaneous creation and evolution of the Greek language and Greek alphabet and render beneath significance and importance the Phoenician theory for the History of Civilization.
www.e-grammes.gr /1997/02/yura_en.htm   (550 words)

  
 Greek Alphabet- EnchantedLearning.com
The Greek alphabet added symbols for vowel sounds; it was the first language that had symbols for both consonant and vowel sounds.
The modern (Ionic) Greek alphabet began to be commonly used in Greece about 400 B.C. In the ancient Greek alphabet, only capital letters were used; lower-case letters were added centuries later.
Greek letters are used throughout the world as symbols in mathematics and the sciences.
www.enchantedlearning.com /language/greek/alphabet   (362 words)

  
 Greek Alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Greek alphabet is thought to be the ancestor of all major European alphabets today.
The Greeks adapted the Phoenician variant of the Semitic alphabet, expanding its 22 consonant symbols to 24 (even more in some dialects), and setting apart some of the original consonant symbols to serve exclusively as vowels (see Greek Language).
Because of Roman conquests and the spread of the Latin language, that language's Roman alphabet became the basic alphabet of all the languages of Western Europe.
www.sigepcalphi.org /CPhiResAlpha.htm   (350 words)

  
 The Greek Alphabet -=- InTheBeginning.org
When learning New Testament Greek, it is as important to see how a Greek alphabetical character is properly written as it is to hear it pronounced correctly.
The names of the Greek letters are both transliterated from Greek into English as an aid to identify in the table of contents to the left, and spelled in all Greek small letters in parenthesis.
It should be observed that the Greek character's name is spelled with a capital letter in the upper left-hand corner, and with a small letter in the upper right-hand corner.
www.inthebeginning.org /ntgreek/alphabet/alphabet.htm   (374 words)

  
 Ancient Greek Literature - History for Kids!
The Greeks wrote a great deal, and a surprising amount of what they wrote is still available to us today, 2500 years later.
During the Roman takeover of Greece, Polybius wrote a History of Rome in Greek.
History of Greek Literature, by Albin Lesky (reprinted 1996).
www.historyforkids.org /learn/greeks/literature/greeklit.htm   (473 words)

  
 The Greek Alphabet
The Greek alphabet was adapted by Cyril and Methodius, Christian missionaries, as the Russian alphabet.
The first letter of the Greek alphabet is said to derive from the Egyptian heiroglyphic for a horned ox's head, by way of the semitic "aleph", which today doesn't look at all ox-like.
Their alphabet did not have a letter for this vowel (or most others), so the Greeks used it instead for the short "e" sound, and used a reverse apostrophe to indicate the "h" sound, which in Greek occurs only at the beginnings of words.
www.pathguy.com /alphabet.htm   (1648 words)

  
 Odyssey/Greece/Writing
Around the 10th century BC, the Greeks borrowed and adapted the Phoenician alphabet to create a writing system for their own language.
The Greek alphabet evolved over several centuries, and by the 5th century BC it used 24 letters - 17 consonants and 7 vowels.
It was the source for the Latin alphabet (developed by the Romans) that we use today.
carlos.emory.edu /ODYSSEY/GREECE/writ.html   (225 words)

  
 Biblical Greek: Alphabet
It is important that you learn the Greek alphabet as soon as possible, and that you feel completely comfortable with it.
You need to be able to read the alphabet (upper- and lower-case letters), and also to feel comfortable writing the alphabet.
The order of the letters in the alphabet is only important for when you are using a dictionary.
www.mythfolklore.net /bibgreek/alphabet/tips.htm   (465 words)

  
 Lesson One: The Greek Alphabet (Module A)
Mastering the sight and sounds of the Greek alphabet lays the cornerstone for learning the sight and sounds of Greek words in all subsequent lessons.
Each of the twenty-four Greek alphabetical characters are enlarged (both capital and small letters together) and sized to be printed on an 8-1/2" x 12" piece of paper.
The SPIonic Greek font is required to be installed on your computer for proper visualization of the Greek letters.
www.inthebeginning.org /ntgreek/lesson1/gl1.htm   (825 words)

  
 A Greek Alphabet Oracle
The following is an authentic ancient Greek alphabet oracle, which is from an inscription in Olympos, a city in ancient Lycia.
Each letter of the alphabet has a corresponding oracle, and the first word of the oracle (in Greek) begins with that letter.
The third number in the alphabet chart, following the semicolon in the parentheses following the letter, is the traditional numerical value of the Greek letter, which may be used in isopsêphia (Greek gematria); it is included for convenience.
www.cs.utk.edu /~mclennan/BA/LAO.html   (2533 words)

  
 The Greek Alphabet For People Who Don't Know Greek
These pages are meant not for students of Greek, but for my myth students and others interested in learning how the Greek alphabet relates to English renderings of Greek words and terms.
In these cases the first gamma will be transliterated as N. Issue 4: Where's H? The standard Greek alphabet doesn't include a separate letter for the H sound, even though many dialects of Greek had the sound.
The Romans used the direct ancestor of our alphabet, which was in turn borrowed from the Greeks but was not identical with the Greek alphabet.
www.classicalmyth.com /alphabet.html   (797 words)

  
 alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Greek alphabet was used by Johannes Bayer around the year 1600 to name the brighter stars.
The basic rule was to name them in order of brightness, but the rule is more often violated than not, the designations commonly also depending on the positionings of the stars within their constellations.
To the Greek letter is appended the Latin possessive form of the constellation name, Vega, the Alpha star of Lyra, becoming Alpha Lyrae, and so on.
www.astro.uiuc.edu /~kaler/sow/greek.html   (87 words)

  
 Greek Alphabet
The Greek alphabet is an alphabet that has been used to write the Greek language since about the 9th century BC.
Besides writing modern Greek, today its letters are used as mathematical symbols, particle names in physics, as names of stars, in the names of fraternities and sororities, in the naming of supernumerary tropical cyclones, and for other purposes.
The Greek alphabet originated as a modification of the Phoenician alphabet and in turn gave rise to the Gothic, Glagolitic, Cyrillic, Coptic, and possibly the Armenian alphabets, as well as the Latin alphabet.
www.physlink.com /Reference/GreekAlphabet.cfm   (216 words)

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