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Topic: Greek religion


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In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  Greek Religion - LoveToKnow 1911
Yet Greek mythology as a whole was irresponsible, without reserve, and unchecked by dogma or sacerdotal prohibition; and frequently it sank below the level of the current religion, which was almost free from the impurities which shock the modern reader of Hellenic myths.
And the anthropomorphic impulse, the strongest trend in the Greek religious imagination, which filled the later world with fictitious personages, generating transparent shams such as an Ampidromus for the ritual of the Ampidromia, Amphiction for the Amphictiones, a hero Kayos for the gild of potters, is already at its height in the Homeric poems.
Yet as Greek religion was always in the service of the state, and the priest a state-official, society was the reverse of theocratic.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Greek_Religion   (3399 words)

  
 Philosophy and Religion: Ancient Religion topics on Encyclopedia.com
Astraea in Greek religion and mythology, goddess of justice; daughter of Zeus and Themis.
Demeter in Greek religion and mythology, goddess of harvest and fertility; daughter of Kronos and Rhea.
Eos in Greek religion and mythology, goddess of dawn; daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia.
www.encyclopedia.com /category/Philosophy_and_Religion/Ancient_Religions/arelig.html   (2042 words)

  
 GREEK RELIGION AND MYTHOLOGY,
The ancient Greeks had a strong sense of weakness before the grand and terrifying powers of nature, and they acknowledged their dependence on the divine beings by whom they believed those powers to be controlled.
The sense of human limitation was thus an integral feature of Greek religion; the gods, the sole source of the good or evil that befell mortals, were approached with invocation and sacrifice in thanksgiving for past blessings or in entreaty for future favors.
The basic elements of classical Greek religion were, in the Hellenistic and Roman periods, somewhat modified and supplemented by the influences of philosophy, Middle Eastern cults, and changes in popular belief (as shown, for instance, in the rise of the cult of Fortune, or Tyche).
www.history.com /encyclopedia.do?articleId=210899   (1775 words)

  
 IV. Religion. Greek Religion. By Professor Clifford Herschel Moore. 1909-14. Lectures on the Harvard Classics. The ...
religion includes all the varied religious beliefs and practices of the peoples living in Greek lands from the beginning of history to the end of paganism.
The ordinary Greek felt that the world was filled with divine beings of varying ranks whose favor he must seek or whose ill nature he must propitiate by offerings and prayer.
The earliest Greek literature, the “Iliad”; and “Odyssey,” 1 shows a circle of gods bound together in a social organization similar to that of the Homeric state.
www.bartleby.com /60/224.html   (1425 words)

  
 Ancient Greek religion - Free Encyclopedia of Thelema
Greek religion is the polytheistic religion practiced in ancient Greece in form of cult practices, thus the practical counterpart of Greek mythology.
It is perhaps misleading to speak of "Greek religion" as a unified system of dogma or ritual; perhaps the most conspicuous aspect of the religions practised in the Greek city states is their overall variety and their localism.
Greek religion spans a period from Minoan and Mycenean periods to the days of Hellenistic Greece and its ultimate conquest by the Roman Empire.
www.egnu.org /thelema/Greek_religion   (2051 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Greek religion
Roman religion The religion of the Roman republic and empire.
The conventional religions of both Greeks and Romans were alike in consisting principally of propitiation and prayers for the good of the city-state, the tribe, or the family, and only secondarily of the person.
Pericles and the plague: civil religion, anomie, and injustice in Thucydides.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Greek+religion   (1617 words)

  
 Greek Mythology - MSN Encarta
Greek Mythology, set of diverse traditional tales told by the ancient Greeks about the exploits of gods and heroes and their relations with ordinary mortals.
Greek mythology was like a complex and rich language, in which the Greeks could express a vast range of perceptions about the world.
The Greek gods resembled human beings in their form and in their emotions, and they lived in a society that resembled human society in its levels of authority and power.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761570116/Greek_Religion.html   (535 words)

  
 Greek religion. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
This phase of Greek religion is called Homeric, after the author of the Iliad, or Olympian, after Mount Olympus, the Thessalian mountain where the gods dwelled.
This form of religion suited the sophisticated city dwellers, among whom there was even a strong monotheistic tendency; however, it did not meet the needs of the people of the provinces, the farmers and shepherds, who retained primitive notions steeped in superstition (see animism).
The Greek philosophers sought a more rational and scientific approach in humanity’s relation to nature, espousing a logical and important connection between humanity and nature, not a mysterious and secret one between humans and god.
www.bartleby.com /65/gr/Greekrel.html   (1087 words)

  
 Titan, in Greek religion and mythology — FactMonster.com
Tethys, in Greek religion and mythology - Tethys Tethys, in Greek religion and mythology, a Titan, daughter of Gaea and Uranus.
Hyperion, in Greek religion and mythology - Hyperion Hyperion, in Greek religion and mythology, a Titan.
Rhea, in Greek religion and mythology - Rhea Rhea, in Greek religion and mythology, a Titan.
www.factmonster.com /cgi-bin/id/A0848868   (296 words)

  
 Greek religion
Greek religion, or rather, Greek religions, is the religion practiced in ancient Greece, and the practical counterpart of Greek mythology.
It is perhaps misleading to speak of "Greek religion" as a unified system of dogma or ritual; perhaps the most conspicuous aspect of the religions practised in the Greek city states is their variety.
The temples of the Greek religion generally were not public gathering places where people gathered socially for collective indoor prayer; most temples were little more than boxes that held a cult idol of the deity.
www.gamesinathens.com /olympics/g/gr/greek_religion.shtml   (1391 words)

  
 [No title]
Paper Topic: Compare the basic feature of Greek Religion with Christianity Greek religion is one of most significant religions during the period of BC in the western countries; it can be seen throughout the Iliad of Homer.
Greek art and Greek science fitted in happily with Greek religion; indeed, religion did much to inspire and sustain the poets and philosophers.
This is a statue of the goddess Athena of ancient Greek religion.
www.lycos.com /info/greek-religion--gods.html   (612 words)

  
 Titan, in Greek religion and mythology — Infoplease.com
Tethys, in Greek religion and mythology - Tethys Tethys, in Greek religion and mythology, a Titan, daughter of Gaea and Uranus.
Hyperion, in Greek religion and mythology - Hyperion Hyperion, in Greek religion and mythology, a Titan.
Rhea, in Greek religion and mythology - Rhea Rhea, in Greek religion and mythology, a Titan.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/society/A0848868.html   (334 words)

  
 Overview of Greek Religion - ReligionFacts
"Greek religion" refers to the polytheistic religion practiced in ancient Greece in the form of cult practices; it is thus the practical counterpart of Greek mythology.
Greek religion spans a period from Minoan and Mycenean periods to the days of Hellenistic Greece and its ultimate conquest by the Roman Empire, and religious ideas developed and evolved over the course of this long history.
The temples of the Greek religion generally were not public gathering places where people gathered socially for collective indoor prayer; most temples were little more than boxes that held a cult idol of the deity.
www.religionfacts.com /greco-roman/overview.htm   (1623 words)

  
 Phoenician influence on Greek Religion 900-600 BC: The Oriental influences seen in the Gods and Goddesses worshipped in ...
The Greeks used holocausts in connection with their cults of the dead; to the Chthonic god Zeus Polieus a piglet was first burnt, then a bull slaughtered, a sequence familiar among the Semites.
Bronze Age Greeks may have practised human sacrifice, as it is alluded to in Homer, as seen in Agamemnon"s sacrifice of Iphigeneia to Artemis and the substitution of a deer at the last minute.
Greek temples were a visual display of the power and influence of an individual city and its ability to construct monuments to its gods.
phoenicia.org /greek.html   (10321 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Greece
A smattering of classical Greek, a little general education, knowledge of the catechism (it can hardly be called theology), and enough liturgical knowledge to perform their functions is all that any one expects of the village priests.
Greeks simply to return to the old allegiance of the first see, as Uniats have done elsewhere, than to make them go through so radical an upsetting of their lives as is involved in turning Latin.
Greeks are waging a hopeless war in the name of Conservatism to keep their predominance.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/06735a.htm   (9174 words)

  
 <<-- G R E E K C I T Y-->> : Greek religion and recipes   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Religion plays a major role in the lives of everyone, be they Greek or of other origin.
The Greek Square Cross that rests on the upper left-side of the flag and occupies one fourth of the total area demonstrates the respect and the devotion the Greek people have for the Greek Orthodox Church and signifies the important role of Christianity in the formation of the modern Hellenic Nation.
According to Greek tradition, his clothes are drenched with brine, his beard drips with seawater, and his face is covered with perspiration because he has been working hard against the waves to reach sinking ships and rescue them from the angry sea.
www.greekcity.com.au /wellbeing/religion/religion.cfm   (780 words)

  
 Greek Mythology: From Rome to Today
Greek religion originated from the worship of one god, who was called Zeus, and developed into the worship of many.
Instead of making their gods great, transcendent, and mysterious, the Greeks, in the words of Edith Hamilton, an honorable citizen of Athens, “…made their gods in their own image.” This is the beginning of humanism, for not only did the Greeks make their gods human-like, but actually glorified the human body in their gods.
The Greeks had a complicated view of their gods as fickle, even proper sacrificing would not guarantee the favor of the gods.
www.hyperhistory.net /apwh/essays/cot/t2w06greekinfluence.htm   (1105 words)

  
 Myth Notes: Introduction
Object of naturalistic religion is to increase fertility of soil.
Fusion and Contamination: The Dorian Contribution Formation of Greek religion was result of fusion of Indo European elements (which were already adulterated) brought in by Minyans and the Achaeans, with the "Aegean" elements borrowed by these peoples from Crete.
This civic and urban character is chief mark of later Greek religion.
www.albany.edu /faculty/lr618/1mnin.html   (1840 words)

  
 Ancient Greek Religion - Crystalinks
The ancient Greeks were a deeply religious people.
The Iliad and the Odyssey, our earliest surviving examples of Greek literature, record men's interactions with various gods and goddesses whose characters and appearances underwent little change in the centuries that followed.
The Greeks attributed these epic narratives to Homer, a poet living at the end of the 8th century BC Each Greek city was normally under the protection of one or more individual deities who were worshipped with special emphasis, as, for example, Athens and the goddess Athena.
www.crystalinks.com /greekreligion.html   (194 words)

  
 Ancient Greek religion
Divinities were the most important element of Greek religion and much emphasis was placed on pleasing the Gods in order to live a life free of oppression and hardship.
However Greek religion was not simply legendary tales and fictitious myths, it was a complex organization with each city-state containing its own divinities, which acted to cement the body of citizens into a true community.
Whilst most Pagan religions hold the belief that their spirit was passed on from one body to the other, Greek religion centered on the belief that the soul moved onto another life, such as Heaven or Hell.
library.thinkquest.org /28111/newpage2.htm   (1457 words)

  
 Greek and Eastern Man's Effect on Religion
Beginning in 650 B C it appears that the Greeks began to borrow myth and cult practices from the East.(Finley 42, 71-2, 83, 88, and 104) Throughout the Classical Greek period mystery religions, cults, and mythology were very popular among the Greek people.
Religion was not separated from everyday life, it was incorporated into every aspect of life.
This is because the Oriental religion was firmly established in the East.
www.richeast.org /htwm/Greeks/religions/greast.html   (1009 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Ancient Greek Religion: Books: Jon D. Mikalson   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ancient Greek Religion provides an introduction to the fundamental beliefs and practices and the major deities of Greek religion.
While the focus is on Athens in the classical period, the book includes detailed discussion of Greek gods and heroes, myth and cult from the archaic age to the Hellenistic world.The book clearly sets out the fascinating but alien concepts of Greek polytheism, building up a picture of Greek religion as it was actually practiced.
It emphasizes the experience of worshippers, considering Greek religious practice from a variety of perspectives - from that of the slave and members of the family, to that of priests and public officials.
www.amazon.ca /Ancient-Greek-Religion-Jon-Mikalson/dp/0631232230   (466 words)

  
 [No title]
Ancient Greek religion was a way of representing, interpreting and constructing the external world and people's experience of it.
Greek religion had no sacred books (which claimed to be the 'word of God' or His prophets), no revelation, no creed, no Ten Commandments.
Homer and Hesiod were only using their poetic licence to bring some measure of coherence to the religious ideas of Greek communities from the eastern end of the Black Sea almost to the Straits of Gilbraltar.
members.lycos.co.uk /sstrickland/greek_religion.htm   (716 words)

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