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Topic: Gregorian Calendar


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  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Gregorian calendar
The Gregorian Calendar, a minor modification of the Julian Calendar, was first proposed by Neapolitan doctor Aloysius Lilius, and adopted by Pope Gregory XIII on February 24, 1582 (the document was dated 1581 on account of the pope starting the year in March).
The Gregorian calendar also fixed the first day of the year as January 1, which was already the first day used in Italy, Germany, and other places, but not universally (England, for example, began the year on March 25).
When the new calendar was put in use, to correct the error already accumulated in the thirteen centuries since the council of Nicaea, a deletion of ten dates was made passing from October 4, 1582 directly to October 15, 1582.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/gr/Gregorian_calendar   (725 words)

  
 The Galileo Project | Chronology | Gregorian Calendar
The rising of the Nile, the crucial event in the Egyptian agricultural cycle, was predicted by the heliacal rising of Sirius,[1] the brightest star in the heavens.
By 1500 the vernal equinox fell on the 10th or 11th of March and the autumnal equinox on the 13th or 14th of September, and the situation was increasingly seen as a scandal.
In 1582 Pope Gregory XIII (hence the name Gregorian Calendar) ordered ten days to be dropped from October, thus restoring the vernalequinox at least to an average of the 20th of March, close to what it had been at the time of the Council of Nicea.
galileo.rice.edu /chron/gregorian.html   (2453 words)

  
  Gregorian Calendar
The Gregorian Calendar, a minor modification of the Julian Calendar, was first proposed by Neapolitan doctor Aloysius Lilius, and adopted by Pope Gregory XIII on February 24, 1582 (the document was dated 1581 on account of the pope starting the year in March).
The Gregorian calendar also fixed the first day of the year as January 1, which was already the first day used in Italy, Germany, and other places, but not universally (England, for example, began the year on March 25).
When the new calendar was put in use, to correct the error already accumulated in the thirteen centuries since the council of Nicaea, a deletion of ten dates was made passing from October 4, 1582 directly to October 15, 1582.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/gr/Gregorian_calendar.html   (700 words)

  
  Gregorian calendar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Gregorian Calendar was devised because the mean year in the Julian Calendar was slightly too long, causing the vernal equinox to slowly drift backwards in the calendar year.
The Gregorian calendar is an arithmetical solar calendar.
Gregorian reform of the calendar: Proceedings of the Vatican conference to commemorate its 400th anniversary, 1582-1992, ed.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Gregorian_calendar   (4812 words)

  
 Calendars and their History
This calendar is the official calendar of Israel and is the liturgical calendar of the Jewish faith.
Since the calendar is based on the true positions of the Sun and Moon, the accuracy of the calendar depends on the accuracy of the astronomical theories and calculations.
In China the calendar was a sacred document, spopnsored and promulgated by the reigning monarch.
astro.nmsu.edu /~lhuber/leaphist.html   (8496 words)

  
 The Julian and Gregorian Calendars
In fact a non-Gregorian calendar reform (involving a 33-year cycle and a prime meridian running through Virginia) would have stabilized the vernal equinox at March 21 for the whole world, but this possibility (assuming it was considered by the Pope) was rejected, presumably on political grounds.
The Gregorian Calendar was adopted immediately upon the promulgation of Pope Gregory's decree in the Catholic countries of Italy, Spain, Portugal and Poland, and shortly thereafter in France and Luxembourg.
Whereas in the Gregorian Calendar a century year is a leap year only if division of the century number by 4 leaves a remainder of 0, in the Eastern Orthodox system a century year is a leap year only if division of the century number by 9 leaves a remainder of 2 or 6.
www.hermetic.ch /cal_stud/cal_art.html   (3479 words)

  
 Calendar Converter
The Gregorian calendar was proclaimed by Pope Gregory XIII and took effect in most Catholic states in 1582, in which October 4, 1582 of the Julian calendar was followed by October 15 in the new calendar, correcting for the accumulated discrepancy between the Julian calendar and the equinox as of that date.
The Julian calendar was proclaimed by Julius Cæsar in 46 B.C. and underwent several modifications before reaching its final form in 8 C.E. The Julian calendar differs from the Gregorian only in the determination of leap years, lacking the correction for years divisible by 100 and 400 in the Gregorian calendar.
The Bahá'í calendar is a solar calendar organised as a hierarchy of cycles, each of length 19, commemorating the 19 year period between the 1844 proclamation of the Báb in Shiraz and the revelation by Bahá'u'lláh in 1863.
www.fourmilab.ch /documents/calendar   (5200 words)

  
 Astronomical Time Keeping
In astronomy and for historical purposes the Julian calendar is also applied to epochs earlier than the year 46 BC when this calendar was not yet defined and the people of that time could not know their date in it.
Calendar of the French revolution: This calendar was designed by S. Marechal in 1787 and established in post-revolutionary France on October 5, 1793.
Civilian calendar of the Federal Republic of Germany: With typical German thoroughness, this calendar is standardized in the norm DIN 1355.
www.maa.mhn.de /Scholar/calendar.html   (3253 words)

  
 Judaism 101: Jewish Calendar
Holidays are celebrated on the same day of the Jewish calendar every year, but the Jewish year is not the same length as a solar year on the Gregorian calendar used by most of the western world, so the date shifts on the Gregorian calendar.
The Jewish calendar is based on three astronomical phenomena: the rotation of the Earth about its axis (a day); the revolution of the moon about the Earth (a month); and the revolution of the Earth about the sun (a year).
Of course, the earlier Gregorian dates are artificial, since the Gregorian calendar did not exist until the 16th century and was not accepted in many parts of the world until much later.
www.jewfaq.org /calendar.htm   (1587 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Reform of the Calendar
There were two main objects to be attained: first, the error of ten days, already mentioned, which had crept in, had to be got rid of; second, its recurrence had to be prevented for the future.
omission from the calendar of the ten superfluous days, so as to bring things back to their proper position.
To obviate the recurrence of the same convenience, it was decided to omit three leap years in every four centuries, and thus eliminate the three superfluous days, which, as we have seen, would be introduced in that period under the Julian system.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/03168a.htm   (1083 words)

  
 Gregorian calendar information - Search.com
The Gregorian Calendar was devised because the mean year in the Julian Calendar was slightly too long, causing the vernal equinox to slowly drift backwards in the calendar year.
The Gregorian calendar is an arithmetical solar calendar.
Gregorian reform of the calendar: Proceedings of the Vatican conference to commemorate its 400th anniversary, 1582-1992, ed.
www.search.com /reference/Gregorian_calendar   (4377 words)

  
 Proleptic Gregorian calendar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The proleptic Gregorian calendar is produced by extending the Gregorian calendar to dates preceding its official introduction in 1582.
Note that the Julian calendar was in actual use after AD 4, until 1582 or later (see From Julian to Gregorian), so historians and astronomers prefer to use the actual Julian calendar during that period.
Likewise, the proleptic Julian calendar is used to specify dates before AD 4, its first quadrennial leap year (leap years between 45 BC and AD 4 were irregular, see Leap years error).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Proleptic_Gregorian_calendar   (282 words)

  
 Gregorian calendar - Free net encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Image:Gregorianscher Kalender Petersdom.jpg The Gregorian calendar is the calendar that is used nearly everywhere in the world.
The last day of the Julian calendar was 4 October 1582 and this was followed by the first day of the Gregorian calendar 15 October 1582.
The Republic of China formally adopted the Gregorian calendar at its founding on 1 January 1912, but China soon descended into a period of warlordism with different warlords using different calendars.
www.netipedia.com /index.php/Gregorian_Calendar   (4041 words)

  
 .:. Gregorian Calendar .:. ASTRAL TRAVELER .:.
By 1500 the vernal equinox fell on the 10th or 11th of March and the autumnal equinox on the 13th or 14th of September, and the situation was increasingly causing unrest among the population.
The Gregorian calendar, which is still in use today, was proposed by Rome to correct the errors in the Julian calendar, and was initially adopted in Catholic countries.
Because of the Pope's decree, the reformed Julian calendar came to be known as the Gregorian calendar.
www.astraltraveler.com /calendars/gregorian.html   (918 words)

  
 Gregorian calendar
The Gregorian calendar was devised because the mean year in the Julian Calendar was a little too long, causing the Vernal equinox to slowly drift earlier in the calendar year.
When the new calendar was put in use, to correct the error already accumulated in the thirteen centuries since the Council of Nicaea, a deletion of ten days was made in the solar calendar.
The last day of the Julian calendar was October 4, 1582 and this was followed by the first day of the Gregorian calendar October 15, 1582, at least according to the papal bull.
www.keywordmage.net /gr/gregorian-calendar.html   (2555 words)

  
 sociology - Gregorian calendar
The 19-year cycle used for the lunar calendar was also to be corrected by 1 day every 300 or 400 years (8 times in 2500 years) along with corrections for the years (1700, 1800, 1900, 2100 etc.) that are no longer leap years.
Sweden started to make the change from the OS calendar and towards the NS calendar in 1700, but it was decided to make the now 11-day adjustment gradually, by excluding the leap days (29 February) from each of 11 successive leap years, 1700 to 1740.
In Russia the Gregorian calendar was accepted after the October Revolution by a decree of the Council of People's Commissars 1918 January 24, according to it January 31 1918 was followed by February 14 1918.
www.aboutsociology.com /sociology/Gregorian_Calendar   (2919 words)

  
 Why Leap Years?
The introduction of the Gregorian calendar should realign the calendar with the equinox, so a number of days had to be dropped when going from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar.
The Gregorian calendar was first adopted in Italy, Poland, Portugal and Spain in 1582.
The Gregorian calendar has a 400 year long cycle and the calendars have the same week days -- February 29, 2008 is a Friday and February 29, 2408 is a Friday.
www.timeanddate.com /date/leapyear.html   (898 words)

  
 The Gregorian Calendar—History
In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII ordered the advancement of the calendar by 10 days and introduced a new corrective device to curb further error: century years such as 1700 or 1800 would no longer be counted as leap years, unless they were (like 1600 or 2000) divisible by 400.
The Gregorian calendar year differs from the solar year by only 26 seconds—accurate enough for most mortals, since this only adds up to one day's difference every 3,323 years.
The semilunar Hebrew calendar, consisting of twelve 29- and 30-day months, adds an intercalary month seven times every 19 years (which explains the sometimes confusing drift of Passover—and consequently Easter—; through April and March).
www.factmonster.com /spot/gregorian1.html   (914 words)

  
 Toke Nørby. The Perpetual Calendar
The Gregorian or New Style Calendar was introduced in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania by Steponas Batoras, Grand Duke of Lithuania on 21 January 1584, soon after the calendar reform of Pope Gregory XIII, and replaced the prevailing Julian or Old Style Calendar (9).
The Gregorian calendar was still in force in the southern Lithuania, the region called Uznemune or Suduva as it in 1795 was given to the German Prussia.
Of course the discrepancy continued but in 1917 the first step was taken to introduce the Gregorian Calendar as the beginning of the year was moved to 1917.03.01 GR leaving out the Days 16-29 February 1916 and the final adjustment was made when they changed the beginning of the year to 1918.01.01 (12).
www.norbyhus.dk /calendar.html   (8071 words)

  
 The Gregorian Calendar—History
Prior to that cataleptic September evening, the official British calendar differed from that of continental Europe by eleven days—that is, September 2 in London was September 13 in Paris, Lisbon, and Berlin.
In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII ordered the advancement of the calendar by 10 days and introduced a new corrective device to curb further error: century years such as 1700 or 1800 would no longer be counted as leap years, unless they were (like 1600 or 2000) divisible by 400.
The Gregorian calendar year differs from the solar year by only 26 seconds—accurate enough for most mortals, since this only adds up to one day's difference every 3,323 years.
www.infoplease.com /spot/gregorian1.html   (925 words)

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