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Topic: Gross world product


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GWP

  
  World economy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Growth in global output (gross world product) (GWP) (in this article defined as GDP converted to US$ through estimated purchasing power parity exchange rates) fell from 4.8% in 2000 to 2.2% in 2001 and 2.7% in 2002.
The causes: sluggishness in the US economy (21.6% of GWP) and in the EU economy (21.4% of GWP) ; continued stagnation in the Japanese economy (7.0% of GWP); and spillover effects in the less developed regions of the world.
Growth in global output (gross world product, GWP) rose to 3% in 1999 from 2% in 1998 despite continued recession in Japan, severe financial difficulties in other East Asian countries, and widespread dislocations in several transition economies, notably Russia.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/World_economy   (1112 words)

  
 IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios
As the differences in base-year data are relatively large, the gross world product paths are plotted as an index and spliced to historical data in 1990.
The historical gross world product growth rate has been about 4% per year since 1950; in the scenarios the average annual growth rates to 2100 range from 3.2% per year to 1.1% per year, with the median value at 2.3% per year.
Figures 2-6a and 2-6b depict the range of gross world product in 2050 and 2100 across all scenarios in the database
www.pnl.gov /aisu/pubs/eemw/papers/ipccreports/specialreports/emission/043.htm   (749 words)

  
 IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios
Figure 2-7: Gross world product and population growth, historical development, 1950 to 1990, and scenarios in the database to 2100, in trillion US dollars and billion people.
Scenarios that lead to a very high gross world product are generally associated with central to low population projections, while high population projections do not lead to the highest gross world product scenarios.
Figure 2-7 illustrates some of the relationships between population and gross world product in the scenarios.
www.grida.no /climate/ipcc/emission/044.htm   (682 words)

  
 rediff.com: Gross world product to grow only 1.5% in 2002: UN
Gross world product to grow only 1.5% in 2002: UN The United Nations on Thursday, forecasting a slow recovery from the economic downturn, projected a growth of only 1.5 per cent in gross world product in 2002 and said global recession is hitting the poor countries of East Asia and Latin America.
The UN's World economic situation and prospects 2002 report suggests that this modest improvement was hostage to a number of economic uncertainties.
The double-barrelled impact of GWP growth that lags behind world population growth in 2001 and 2002 poses serious difficulties for the developing countries, according to the report.
www.rediff.com /money/2002/jan/10gwp.htm   (470 words)

  
 IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios
A2 Although the SRES scenarios span a wide range, still lower and higher gross world product levels can be found in the literature (see Chapters 2, 3, and 4).
Uncertainties in future gross world product levels are governed by the pace of future productivity growth and population growth, especially in developing regions.
Given a qualitatively negative relationship between population growth and per capita income growth discussed in Chapters 2 and 3, uncertainties in future population growth rates tend to narrow the range of associated gross world product projections.
www.grida.no /climate/ipcc/emission/135.htm   (1298 words)

  
 Gross domestic product   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is the the broadest measure of economic activity.
Gross domestic product, $91.2, $101.4, $293.8, $526.4, $1038.5, $2789.5, $5803.1, $7397.7, $9817.0, $10100.8, $10480.8, $10987.9, 11735.0...
Gross Domestic Product in Scotland rose by 1.6 per cent over the year to 2004 Q1 and by 0.2 per cent in the first quarter of 2004.
www.integralphotography.com /gross+domestic+product.html   (915 words)

  
 NSW HSC ONLINE - Economics
In a world of shrinking space, time and disappearing borders the impacts of globalisation are being felt by all countries.
Gross World Product (also referred to as World Real GDP or Real World Gross Product) is measured by adding together the outputs of the world economies.
The advanced economies of the world have 50% of the population and 15% of World GDP.
hsc.csu.edu.au /economics/global_economy/whatis_globalisation/tut1whatisglobalisation.html   (1135 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Gross Domestic Product
Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the total value of goods and services produced in a country over a period of time.
However, it is difficult to measure GDP precisely, partly because every country has an unofficial economy, often called a fl economy, that consists of transactions not reported to government.
However, until as recently as the early 1990s, the United States, Germany, and Japan commonly used the Gross National Product (GNP) to measure economic activity.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761588125/Gross_Domestic_Product.html   (392 words)

  
 Interactive Table of World Nations
The Gross Domestic Product is the total value of goods and services sold within that nation.
Click on the Gross Domestic Product category to sort the economies of the world from richest to poorest, and to sort the typical citizen of each nation from richest to poorest.
This figure is reached by dividing the Gross Domestic Product by the population.
www.mrdowling.com /800gdp.html   (340 words)

  
 In freedom and understanding   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
Since 1960 the countries where the richest 20% of the world's people live have increased their share of gross world product from 73% to 83%.
The richest 225 people in the world have a combined wealth of more than $1 trillion - equal to the annual income of the poorest 47% of the earths population, some 2.5 billion people.
There are 15 individuals in the world who are worth more than the whole of sub-Sahara Africa - some 600 million people while over 100 million children throughout the world are forced to work under hazardous and often fatal conditions; many are employed under slave- like conditions for no pay.
www.angelfire.com /rebellion/myrevolution/Statistics.html   (432 words)

  
 > Gross domestic product abcworld.net   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
In economics, gross domestic product (GDP) is a measure of the value of economic production of a particular territory in financial capital terms during a specified period.
GDP differs from gross national product (GNP) in excluding inter-country income transfers, in effect attributing to a territory the product generated within it rather than the incomes received in it.
Buying financial products is classed as saving in macroeconomics, as opposed to investment (which, in the GDP formula is a form of spending).
www.abcworld.net /Gross_domestic_product.html   (2749 words)

  
 Glossary: GDP (Gross Domestic Product)
The components of GDP are consumption, gross investment, government purchases of goods and services, and net exports.
Per capita GDP is calculated by dividing the total Gross Domestic Product for a country by the number of people who live there.
Gross world product is the total Gross National Product of all the countries in the world.
www.greenfacts.org /glossary/ghi/GDP-gross-domestic-product.htm   (155 words)

  
 Eco-Economy Indicators: ECONOMIC GROWTH - World Economic Growth Fastest in Nearly Three Decades
World output of goods and services increased from $7 trillion in 1950 to $56 trillion in 2004, while annual income per person grew from $2,835 to $8,753 during this time.
As a result of productivity growth, reduced interest rates, a mounting fiscal deficit, and higher corporate investment, the United States increased output by 4.4 percent in 2004.
The Living Planet Index is an indicator of the state of the world’s biodiversity, and the Ecological Footprint documents humanity’s consumption of renewable natural resources.
www.earth-policy.org /Indicators/Econ/2005.htm   (1251 words)

  
 The End of Economic Growth
After World War I, middle-class neighborhoods were made up of bungalows on one-sixth acre lots: often, the neighborhood stores were not quite close enough to walk to easily, so people drove a few blocks to buy their groceries.
After World War II, when the federal government actively promoted suburbanization to stimulate economic growth and create jobs, middle-class neighborhoods were made up of suburban homes on quarter-acre lots: the city was rebuilt around the freeway, and to buy groceries, you had to drive on high speed arterial streets, where the traffic was nerve racking.
Much of the developing world is at the stage now where Europe was in the nineteenth century, when workers lived in urban slums where conditions were much worse than in rural subsistence economies.
www.preservenet.com /endgrowth/EndGrowth.html   (19608 words)

  
 Climate Change 2001: Mitigation
This index approximates the time-integrated warming effect of a unit mass of a given greenhouse gas in today’s atmosphere, relative to that of carbon dioxide.
An aggregation of the Gross Domestic Products of the world.
The sum of gross value added, at purchasers’ prices, by all resident and non-resident producers in the economy, plus any taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products in a country or a geographic region for a given period of time, normally 1 year.
www.grida.no /climate/ipcc_tar/wg3/460.htm   (563 words)

  
 Hudson Institute > Publication Details
However, we believe that the population and gross world product are likely to stabilize well below these levels—the population at about two or three times that of today and the gross world product at perhaps twenty or thirty times its present size.
The book tried to make plausible our conclusion that natural, social, political, and cultural forces were likely to slow the growth of both population and production long before the world encountered any fundamentally unmanageable problems of supply, pollution, or other side effects of the great 400-year transition.
World Economic Development concludes that many widely accepted ideas about economic growth are outdated (if they were ever true), and that much of the pessimism that until recently has characterized the discussion of economic growth is unwarranted.
www.hudson.org /index.cfm?fuseaction=publication_details&id=2217   (700 words)

  
 World Economy 1995 - Flags, Maps, Economy, Geography, Climate, Natural Resources, Current Issues, International ...
Average growth of 1% in the GDP of industrialized countries (57% of GWP in 1993) and average growth of 6% in the GDP of less developed countries (37% of GWP) were partly offset by a further 10% drop in the GDP of the former USSR/Eastern Europe area (now only 6% of GWP).
Within the industrialized world the US posted a 3% growth rate whereas both Japan and the 12-member European Union (formerly the European Community) had zero growth.
Because of their own internal problems, the industrialized countries have inadequate resources to deal effectively with the poorer areas of the world, which, at least from the economic point of view, are becoming further marginalized.
www.theodora.com /wfb/1995/world/world_economy.html   (546 words)

  
 Online edition of Daily News - Business
The rate of growth of gross world product is forecast to be only 1.7 percent in 2002, and less than 3 percent in 2003, according to a global forecast by economists from around the world, released last week at the United Nations.
Particularly hard hit is Latin America, where Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is expected to decline by 0.9 percent in 2002, according to project LINK, a co-operative, non governmental, international research activity, jointly co-ordinated by the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) and the University of Toronto.
It is generally agreed that the longer external deficits of the United States continue, the greater the risk of an abrupt correction and a shock to the world economy.
www.dailynews.lk /2002/10/17/bus02.html   (657 words)

  
 Arctic Borderlands Ecological Knowledge Co-op: Indicators -- Greenhouse Gas Emissions Worldwide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
Greenhouse gas emissions have increased at the same rate as the overall world economic production, measured by the Gross World Product (GWP - the red triangles on the chart).
The GWP reflects the increase in worldwide industrialization and human population levels.
However, the steady increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is now having an effect on the world's climate, and this effect is expected to increase.
www.taiga.net /coop/indics/grnhsemit.html   (186 words)

  
 UN Publications: World Economic Situation and Prospects 2002
The weakness in the world economy has become widespread, with more than a dozen economies in recession and more than three-quarters growing less than they did a year previously.
Two consecutive years of GWP growth that lags behind world population growth encompasses particular difficulties for the developing countries, according to the United Nations.
As transnational corporations reposition themselves for the more price-driven environment created by the slow-down of the world economy and as developing countries liberalize their regulatory frameworks further, there may be a redistribution of FDI towards developing countries, particularly since reinvested earnings are increasing.
www.un.org /Pubs/whatsnew/e02047pr.htm   (865 words)

  
 III - World Overview   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
In 2004, world insurance premium volume, for both sectors combined, totaled $3.24 trillion, up 9.7 percent from $2.96 trillion in 2003, according to Swiss Re.
The number of countries in the survey of world insurance premiums conducted by Swiss Re increased from 78 in 1995 to 88 in 2004.
To be included, countries must have had reliable data and direct premiums of over $100 million from 1995 to 1998, over $150 million from 1999 to 2002, at least $200 million in 2003 and at least $250 million in 2004.
www.iii.org /international/overview?table_sort_724581=4   (219 words)

  
 World Economy - Flags, Maps, Economy, Geography, Climate, Natural Resources, Current Issues, International Agreements, ...
Economy—overview: Growth in global output (gross world product, GWP) dropped to 2% in 1998 from 4% in 1997 because of continued recession in Japan, severe financial difficulties in other East Asian countries, and widespread dislocations in the Russian economy.
China, the second largest economy in the world, continued its rapid growth and accounted for 11% of GWP.
Russia's national product dropped by 5% whereas the nations of central and eastern Europe grew by 3.4% on average.
www.photius.com /wfb1999/world/world_economy.html   (581 words)

  
 [No title]
Average growth of 1.5% in the GDP of industrialized countries (62% of GWP in 1992) and average growth of 5% in the GDP of less developed countries (30% of GWP) were offset by a further 15-20% drop in the GDP of the former Soviet-East European area (now only 8% of GWP).
The continued plunge in production in practically all the former Warsaw Pact economies strained the political and social fabric of these newly independent nations, in particular in Russia.
The addition of nearly 100 million people their own internal problems, the industrialized countries have inadequate resources to deal effectively with the poorer areas of the world, which, at least from the economic point of view, are becoming further marginalized.
www.umsl.edu /services/govdocs/wofact93/wf940248.txt   (286 words)

  
 CIA World Factbook 1995: Notes, Definitions, and Abbreviations   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
The gross domestic product (GDP) of all countries is now presented on a purchasing power parity (PPP) basis rather than on the old exchange rate basis.
Gross national product (GNP): The value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year, plus income earned abroad, minus income earned by foreigners from domestic production.
Gross world product (GWP): The aggregate value of all goods and services produced worldwide in a given year.
www.hri.org /docs/CIA/nda.html   (3503 words)

  
 World Economy 2000 - Flags, Maps, Economy, Geography, Climate, Natural Resources, Current Issues, International ...
Economy - overview: Growth in global output (gross world product, GWP) rose to 3% in 1999 from 2% in 1998 despite continued recession in Japan, severe financial difficulties in other East Asian countries, and widespread dislocations in several transition economies, notably Russia.
China, the second largest economy in the world, continued its strong growth and accounted for 12% of GWP.
The introduction of the euro as the common currency of much of Western Europe in January 1999, while strengthening prospects for an integrated economic powerhouse, poses serious economic risks because of varying levels of income and cultural and political differences among the participating nations.
www.photius.com /wfb2000/countries/world/world_economy.html   (613 words)

  
 Trend   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
The folliwng data set gives the gross world product per person for year 1950 through 1999.
Build an XY graph of the GWP Data and create a linear trend line with equation an r-squared value showing.
Build a line graph of the GWP Data and create a linear trend line with equation an r-squared value showing.
www.campfrontier.org /quant/trend.htm   (262 words)

  
 Best bank data domestic gross product world Site Resources   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
Economic Indicator: Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Gross domestic product or GDP is the broadest measure...
Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Per Capita, 1998 Analytical Overview This map was developed based on data in the World Bank’s (2000) World Development Indicators publication.
Confirmed Growth Bolsters Greenback Confirming earlier notions of growth in the world’s largest economy, gross domestic product figures rose 3.8 percent in the quarter versus expectations of a 3.6 percent rise.
speedy-find.info /domestic/bank-data-domestic-gross-product-world.php   (924 words)

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