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Topic: Gulf of Taranto


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  Taranto
Diocese in southern Italy, on a bay in the Gulf of Taranto.
It was retaken by the Byzantines, who were forced to cede it to Otto II in 982; in 1080 it fell into the hands of Robert Guiscard, who made it the capital of the Principality of Taranto, and gave it to Boemund, his son.
Taranto is the birthplace of the musician Paisiello.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/t/taranto.html   (733 words)

  
  Taranto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The expansion of Taranto was limited to the coast because of the resistance of the populations of inner Apulia.
Taranto was finally conquered by the Normans: the sons of Petron elected the first Norman archbishop, Drogo, in 1071, and prepared a fleet to conquer Durazzo.
Taranto became the capital of a Norman principality, whose first ruler was Robert Guiscard's son, Bohemond of Taranto, who obtained it as result of succession dispute: his father repudiated his first wife, Bohemond's mother, and had Roger Borsa, his son by his second wife Sikelgaita, succeed him as Duke of Apulia.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Taranto   (4419 words)

  
 TARANTO - LoveToKnow Article on TARANTO   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
This island separates the Gulf of Taranto from the deep inlet of the Mare Piccolo, and is sheltered by two other flat islands, San Pietro and San Paolo; the latter is occupied by a lighthouse.
In 1861 the strategic importance of Taranto was recognized by the Italian government, and in 1864 a Naval Commission designated it as third maritime arsenal after Spezia and Venice.
In 927 Taranto was entirely destroyed by the Saracens, but rebuilt in 967 by Nicephorus Phocas, to whom is due the construction of the bridge over the channel to the N.W. of the town, and of the aqueduct which passes over it.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /T/TA/TARANTO.htm   (693 words)

  
 Gulf of Taranto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Gulf of Taranto (Italian: Golfo di Taranto, Latin: Sinus Tarentinus) is a gulf of the Ionian sea, in southern Italy.
The Gulf of Taranto is almost square, 140 km long and wide, and is delimited by the capes Santa Maria di Leuca (east, Apulia) and Colonna (the ancient Cape Lacinium, west, in Calabria).
The main cities on the gulf are Taranto and Gallipoli.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Gulf_of_Taranto   (181 words)

  
 Taranto - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Taranto (ancient Tarentum), city and port, southern Italy, capital of Taranto Province, in Apulia Region, on the Gulf of Taranto.
Taranto is a coastal city in Apulia, southern Italy.
It is the capital of Province of Taranto and is an important military and commercial port.
encarta.msn.com /Taranto.html   (183 words)

  
 Taranto   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Taranto was founded in about 708 BC by Spartan immigrants, and became a sovereign city of Magna Graecia, the Greek colonies in Southern Italy.
At that time, Taranto had the most powerful naval forces in Italy, and hastened to come to an agreement with Rome which stated that the Lacinio promontory and the Gulf of Taranto should not be passed by Roman ships.
Taranto, however, thought that this was a hostile act, and responded by sinking the fleet and expelling the roman troops from Thurii.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/taranto   (619 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Search Results - Taranto
Taranto (ancient Tarentum), city and port in southern Italy, capital of Taranto Province, in Apulia Region, on the Gulf of Taranto.
Taranto, Battle of, military engagement of World War II in 1940 in which carrier-based aircraft of the British Navy inflicted severe damage on the...
Taranto, Gulf of, huge, almost square bay of the Ionian Sea, which forms the “instep” of the “boot” of Italy.
uk.encarta.msn.com /Taranto.html   (99 words)

  
 SingaporeMoms - Parenting Encyclopedia - Taranto
In 466 BC, Taranto was defeated by Iapyges, a native population of ancient Apulia, and the monarchy fell, with the inauguration of a democracy, and the expulsion of the Pythagoreans.
Taranto was definitely conquered by the Normans: the sons of Petrone elect the first Norman archbishop, Drogo, in 1071, and prepared a fleet to conquer Durazzo.
Taranto became the capital of a Norman principality, whose first ruler was Robert Guiscard's son, Bohemond of Taranto.
www.singaporemoms.com /parenting/Taranto   (3861 words)

  
 english
to the southeast, and the Strait of Otranto and Gulf of Taranto in the south.
Apulia is mostly a plain; its low coast, however, is broken by the mountainous Garagano Peninsula in the north, and there are mountains in the north central part of the region.
Fishing is pursued in the Adriatic and in the Gulf of Taranto.
www.santunicola-bedbreakfast.com /english1.htm   (780 words)

  
 Gulf of Taranto -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The Gulf of Taranto ((A native or inhabitant of Italy) Italian: Golfo di Taranto, (Any dialect of the language of ancient Rome) Latin: Sinus Tarentinus) is a gulf of the (An arm of the Mediterranean Sea between western Greece and southern Italy) Ionian sea, in southern Italy.
The Gulf of Taranto is almost square, 140 km long and wide, and is delimited by the capes Santa Maria di Leuca (east, (A region in southeastern Italy on the Adriatic) Apulia) and Colonna (the ancient Cape Lacinium, west, in (A region of southern Italy (forming the toe of the Italian `boot')) Calabria).
The (A republic in southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula; was the core of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire between the 4th century BC and the 5th century AD) Italy claims the whole gulf as national waters, thus closed to international traffic.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/G/Gu/Gulf_of_Taranto.htm   (326 words)

  
 Taranto (Catholic Encyclopedia) - BibleWiki
Diocese in southern Italy, on a bay in the Gulf of Taranto.
It was retaken by the Byzantines, who were forced to cede it to Otto II in 982; in 1080 it fell into the hands of Robert Guiscard, who made it the capital of the Principality of Taranto, and gave it to Boemund, his son.
According to the local legend, the Gospel was preached in Taranto by the same St. Peter who had consecrated St. Amasianus bishop.
bible.tmtm.com /wiki/Taranto_%28Catholic_Encyclopedia%29   (710 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Taranto
The Gulf of Taranto from the satellite The Gulf of Taranto (Italian: Golfo di Taranto, Latin: Sinus Tarentinus) is a gulf of the Ionian sea, in southern Italy.
Philip II of Taranto (1329-1374): of the Angevin house, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, titular Emperor of Constantinople.
Isabella de Clermont (died 1465), Princess of Taranto, was the elder daughter of Tristan di Chiaramonte (Tristan de Clermont-Lodeve), Count of Capertino, and Catherine of Baux Orsini.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Taranto   (11448 words)

  
 BASILICATA - LoveToKnow Article on BASILICATA   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
by those of Ban and Lecce, E. by the Gulf of Taranto (for a distance of 24 m.), S. by the province of Cdsnza, and W. by the Mediterranean(for a distaf~ce of 10 m.
The province is traversed from W. to E. by the railway from Naples to Taranto and Brindisi, which passes through Potenza and reaches at Metapoiito the line along the E. coast from Taranto to Reggio di Calabria.
The mountains are still to some extent clothed with forests; in places the soil is fertile, especially along the Gulf of Taranto, though here malaria is the cause of inefficient cultivation.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /B/BA/BASILICATA.htm   (256 words)

  
 Gulf Stream --  Encyclopædia Britannica
In popular conception the Gulf Stream also includes the Florida Current (between the Straits of Florida and Cape Hatteras) and the West Wind Drift (east of the Grand Banks).
The gulf extends approximately 300 miles (500 km) from Puerto Angel, in Oaxaca state, southeastward to Barra del Suchiate, in Chiapas state, and measures approximately 100 miles (160 km) across its mouth.
Cape Maléa, which divides the Gulf of Laconia from the Aegean Sea, was once feared by sailors for its treacherous winds and harbourless coast.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9038484   (939 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Taranto
Diocese in southern Italy, on a bay in the Gulf of
Taranto in 545 during the Gothic wars, but abandoned it in 552.
Taranto by the same St. Peter who had consecrated St. Amasianus bishop.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/14450d.htm   (819 words)

  
 Taranto on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
BC, Taranto was a town of Magna Graecia and was powerful enough to resist the Romans until 272 BC It was destroyed (927) by the Arabs but was later rebuilt by the Byzantines.
As a part of the kingdom of Naples the city was strongly fortified and was held as a principality by various lords.
Of note in Taranto are the cathedral (11th-12th cent., with a baroque facade), a castle (originally Byzantine, rebuilt in 1480), and the national museum (with a fine collection of Greek pottery).
www.encyclopedia.com /html/T/Taranto.asp   (566 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Taranto, Italy (Italian Political Geography) - Encyclopedia
Taranto is, after La Spezia, the chief military port of Italy, and it is also an agricultural, industrial, and fishing center.
B.C., Taranto was a town of Magna Graecia and was powerful enough to resist the Romans until 272
Of note in Taranto are the cathedral (11th–12th cent., with a baroque facade), a castle (originally Byzantine, rebuilt in 1480), and the national museum (with a fine collection of Greek pottery).
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/T/Taranto.html   (284 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Apulia, Italy (Italian Political Geography) - Encyclopedia
Its southern portion, a peninsula, forms the heel of the Italian "boot." Bari is the capital of the region, which is divided into Bari, Brindisi, Foggia, Lecce, and Taranto provs.
Apulia is mostly a plain; its low coast, however, is broken by the mountainous Garagano Peninsula in the north, and there are mountains in the north central part of the region.
Fishing is pursued in the Adriatic and in the Gulf of Taranto.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/A/Apulia.html   (473 words)

  
 historic hotels taranto   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
It is also famous for the British attack to the Regia Marina base during the World War II, known as the Battle (or Nigth) of Taranto.
taranto historic hotels - Taranto is a city in southern Italy.
It is the capital of Taranto province, and is also a port, and is located on the Gulf of...
www.capri-exclusive.com /puglia-apulia/historic-hotels/taranto.html   (402 words)

  
 MARINA - LAGHI DI SIBARI -Bathing Nautical Center Laghi di Sibari - Sibari (CS) Italy - POSITION
Situated in the center of the Gulf of Taranto Sibari is the ideal Base for voyages towrds the Adriatic, Sicily, Malta, Greece or Turkey.
Sibari, the most ancient and famous Hellenic colony in Magna Graecia, was founded by the Peloponnesian Ackaeans in the VIII century B.C. in the centre of the Gulf of Taranto, among the terminal stretches of the Rivers Krathis and Sybaris (today's Crati ana Coscile), whose mouths offered excellent mooring possibilities.
The city, thanks to the fertility of its plain in which it was situated, became the main peopling centre of the district and one of the greatest in the ancient world.
www.marina-sibari.it /web_eng/position.htm   (482 words)

  
 taranto   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Taranto is located in Southeast Italy, on the western side of the "heel" of the Italian boot, on the Gulf of Taranto on the Ionian Sea.
All six of the Italian battleships of the 5th and 9th Divisions were in port on the night of the attack.
Despite the losses at Taranto, the Italian Navy still had the material wherewithal and desire to bring the British forces to combat.
history.acusd.edu /gen/WW2Timeline/taranto.html   (417 words)

  
 Gulf of Taranto - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Gulf of Taranto - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
The Italy claims the whole gulf as national waters, thus closed to international traffic.
This position, which stem some problems with a similar position of Lybia on Gulf of Sidra, is not recognized by some other countries, such as USA and UK.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Tarentine_Gulf   (195 words)

  
 Travel Forum - Taranto, Italy
Taranto is also a very important naval base (both commercial and militar), and it has well-developed steel and iron foundries, chemical works, some shipyards for building warships, and food-processing factories.
Another tradition indicates Taras, son of Poseidon, as the founder of the city; the symbol of the Greek city (as well as of the modern city) is Taras riding a dolphin.
Taranto increased its power, becoming a commercial power and a sovereign city of Magna Graecia, the Greek colonies in Southern Italy.
www.ttgforum.com /showthread.php?t=440   (1024 words)

  
 APENNINES - LoveToKnow Article on APENNINES   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The Ligurian Apennines extend as far as the pass of La Cisa in the upper valley of the Magra (anc.
On the north and north-east lie the broad plains of Piedmont and Lombardy, traversed by the Po, the chief tributaries of which from the Ligurian Apennines are the Scrivia (O/andmz),Trebbia (Trebia) andTaro (Tarus).
The first up extends as far as the isthmus formed by the gulfs of S. ifemia and Squillace; it is known as the Sila, and the highest mt reached is 6330 ft. (the Botte Donato).
www.87.1911encyclopedia.org /A/AP/APENNINES.htm   (1421 words)

  
 Taranto (town)
Naval base and port in Apulia region, southeast Italy, on the Gulf of Taranto, 80 km/50 mi southeast of Bari; population (2001 est) 201,400.
Taranto was taken by the Normans in 1063, and became a feudal principality subject to the Kingdom of Naples.
It was the main base of the Italian fleet during World War II until an attack by a British torpedo bomber in December 1940 severely damaged several vessels, including three battleships.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0012954.html   (268 words)

  
 Land and Resources - Italy - Europe
In the northwest is the Gulf of Genoa, the harbor of the important commercial city of Genoa.
A little farther south is the Gulf of Salerno, at the head of which stands the port of Salerno.
The southeastern end of the peninsula is deeply indented by the Gulf of Taranto, which divides the so-called heel of Italy (ancient Calabria) from the toe (modern Calabria).
www.countriesquest.com /europe/italy/land_and_resources.htm   (636 words)

  
 puglia apulia taranto   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Taranto is also a very important naval base (both commercial and military), and it has well-developed steel and iron foundries, chemical works, some shipyards for building warships, and food-processing factories.
On the way to Otranto you have the chance to visit the famous Grotta Zinzulusa, which is the only grotto open to the public.
taranto - Taranto is a city in southern Italy.
www.capri-exclusive.com /puglia-apulia/taranto.html   (821 words)

  
 05/04/02: The Gulf of Taranto
Top right corner of image, on the western side of the "heel" of the Italian boot: the city of Taranto, the old "Tarentum", called Taras by the Greeks, founded in 707 B.C. by some Spartans.
The two islets of S. Pietro and S. Paolo protect Taranto Bay (Mar grande) and the commercial port, while the old city forms another bay (Mar piccolo), a military port next in strategic importance to La Spezia.
Taranto has a large export trade and extensive works connected with the construction of warships.
earth.esrin.esa.it /ers/ers_action/taranto.html   (299 words)

  
 Tarentum   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
In 472 BC, Taranto signed an alliance with Rhegion, to counter the Messapii, Peucezi and Lucanians (all Italic peoples), but the Tarantine and Reggian joint armies were defeated near Kailìa (modern Ceglie).
The angered Tarantines, considering it a hostile act openly in conflict with the pact, which forbade the gulf of Taranto to Roman ships, responded by attacking the Roman fleet: the Tarantine navy sunk four Roman ships, and captured a fifth (Cassius Dio, Roman History, xxxxix.4 (http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Roman/Texts/Cassius_Dio/9*.html#39.4)).
During the Second Punic War, Taranto the Romans heavily garrisoned the city for fear that it might go over to Hannibal.
www.usedaudiparts.com /search.php?title=Tarentum   (4214 words)

  
 Lucania   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Lucania was an ancient district of southern Italy, extending from the Tyrrhenian Sea to the Gulf of Taranto.
To the north it adjoined Campania, Samnium and Apulia, and to the south it was separated by a narrow isthmus from the district of Bruttii.
The main ridge approaches the western sea, and is continued from the lofty knot of mountains on the frontiers of Samnium, nearly due south to within a few miles of the Gulf of Policastro, and thenceforward is separated from the sea by only a narrow interval until it enters the district of the Bruttii.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/L/Lucania.htm   (1075 words)

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