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Topic: Gymnosperm


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In the News (Sun 18 Nov 18)

  
  The Gymnosperm Database: Home Page
Welcome to the Gymnosperm Database, the web's premier source of information on conifers and their allies.
For instance, it includes pages on the gymnosperms of Australia, the oldest trees in the world, and accounts of some of my field excursions.
The Gymnosperm Database was established as an online entity in the summer of 1997 and has since grown steadily, getting its own URL (Conifers.org) in the summer of 1999.
www.conifers.org   (1355 words)

  
  In this experiment, the effects of temperature on rate of photosynthesis in gymnosperms and angiosperms was studied ...
Since gymnosperm needles remain green and attached to their tree branches in the winter time while angiosperm leaves turn brown, die and fall off of the branches, it was hypothesized that gymnosperms exhibit significantly higher rates of photosynthesis in colder climates than do angiosperms.
In support of the hypothesis, however, the mean rates of photosynthesis for the angiosperm and gymnosperm in the cold climate (which were -.3921 and -2.327 ppm/min/g, respectively) were indeed found to be significantly different; the gymnosperm rate of photosynthesis was significantly greater in cold climate than that of the angiosperm with a p-value of 0.0490.
Perhaps the reason that the gymnosperms maintain their green color in the winter is because of the possibility that they may go dormant in the winter time to conserve energy, much like hibernation; the green color is just the pigment being stored in the plant.
www.colorado.edu /eeb/courses/1230jbasey/abstracts/lyon.html   (942 words)

  
  Gymnosperm - ninemsn Encarta
Gymnosperms are woody plants, either shrubs, trees, or, rarely, vines (some gnetophytes).
The gymnosperms include the most ancient of the living seed plants; they appear to have arisen from fern-like ancestors in the Devonian period (about 408.5 million to 362.5 million years ago).
Living gymnosperms are distributed throughout the world, with a majority, particularly the conifers, in temperate and subarctic regions.
au.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761567325/Gymnosperm.html   (202 words)

  
 Gymnosperm - MSN Encarta
They differ from the other phylum of seed plants, the flowering plants (see Angiosperm), in that the seeds are not enclosed in carpels but rather are borne upon seed scales arranged in cones.
The gymnosperms are the most ancient seed plants; they appear to have arisen from fern ancestors in the Devonian Period.
Living gymnosperms are distributed worldwide, with a majority, particularly the conifers, in temperate and subarctic regions.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761567325/Gymnosperm.html   (207 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Gymnosperm
The gymnosperms, a group that includes the pine, have stems, roots and leaves, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
cone or strobilus, in botany, reproductive organ of the gymnosperms (the conifers, cycads, and ginkgoes).
Gymnosperms of northeast Alabama and adjacent highlands.(conifer plants)
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Gymnosperm&StartAt=1   (547 words)

  
 Brooklyn Botanic Garden: GARDEN BOTANY
Gymnosperms are plants with vascular tissue and are considered more advanced than both bryophytes and ferns because, among other things, they produce seeds.
Gymnosperms are woody and may be trees, shrubs, or even vines.
In addition, all gymnosperms are heterosporous, meaning that they produce two types of spores, small male spores called microspores and large female spores called megaspores -- a condition also true of certain ferns, Selaginella (the spike mosses), Isoetes (the quillworts), and all flowering plants.
www.bbg.org /gar2/topics/botany/repro_gymnosperms.html   (1024 words)

  
 Comparing Reproduction of a Gymnosperm and Angiosperm
Gymnosperms are the non-flowering seed plants such as cedar, pine, redwood, hemlock, and firs.
Gymnosperms are woody plants that bear "naked seeds." They are called naked because their seeds develop exposed on the upper surfaces of cone scales, such as in pine cones.
Gymnosperms are usually of large size with much secondary growth, the leaves are usually evergreen needles or scales.
www.msnucleus.org /membership/html/k-6/lc/plants/5/lcp5_5a.html   (455 words)

  
 RNR: "Seed Plants: Gymnosperms" Lesson Plan
Gymnosperms are vascular plants that develop uncovered seeds.
The food supply surrounding the gymnosperm embryo should not be confused with the fruit of an angiosperm.
Note that many species of gymnosperms may have become extinct, since they may not have been able to adapt to the colder climate of the glacial periods.
sftrc.cas.psu.edu /LessonPlans/Forestry/Gymnosperms.html   (479 words)

  
 Chapter 22:  Gymnosperms
The leaves, roots, and stems of pine trees are discussed, and pines are also used to portray the life cycle of a typical gymnosperm.
The chapter concludes with a digest of the human and ecological relevance of gymnosperms, with particular emphasis on the conifers.
Describe the term Gymnosperm and the botany condition it represents.
academic.kellogg.edu /herbrandsonc/bio111/gymnosperms.htm   (421 words)

  
 In this experiment, the effects of temperature on rate of photosynthesis in gymnosperms and angiosperms was studied ...
Since gymnosperm needles remain green and attached to their tree branches in the winter time while angiosperm leaves turn brown, die and fall off of the branches, it was hypothesized that gymnosperms exhibit significantly higher rates of photosynthesis in colder climates than do angiosperms.
In support of the hypothesis, however, the mean rates of photosynthesis for the angiosperm and gymnosperm in the cold climate (which were -.3921 and -2.327 ppm/min/g, respectively) were indeed found to be significantly different; the gymnosperm rate of photosynthesis was significantly greater in cold climate than that of the angiosperm with a p-value of 0.0490.
Perhaps the reason that the gymnosperms maintain their green color in the winter is because of the possibility that they may go dormant in the winter time to conserve energy, much like hibernation; the green color is just the pigment being stored in the plant.
spot.colorado.edu /~basey/lyon.html   (942 words)

  
 Gymnosperms of Northeastern Wisconsin
The terms "gymnosperm", "conifer" and "evergreen" are often used interchangeably.
Gymnosperm refers to a distinct group of plants, sharing common ancestry and defined by (among other things) a method of reproduction in which seeds develop on the surface of cone scales, exposed to the environment.
There are other gymnosperms elsewhere that are not trees and do not produce cones, at least not in the form that we commonly recognize.
www.uwgb.edu /biodiversity/herbarium/gymnosperms/gymno_intro.htm   (256 words)

  
 Evolution and Phylogenetic Relationships   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Angiosperm rose from a phylum known as gymnosperm, which are less evolutionary advanced in comparison to angiosperms.
Gymnosperm include any plant whose ovules and the seeds into which they develop are born unprotected; the term gymnosperm means "naked seed." This is because the seeds have only a dry, thin covering instead of a sturdy protective seed coat.
The main difference between gymnosperms and angiosperms is that the ovules and the seeds of gymnosperms are unprotected unlike the seeds of angiosperms which are enclosed in fruit.
www.personal.psu.edu /users/k/n/knj106/evol.html   (623 words)

  
 Gymnosperms 304
Many more gymnosperms were present in the past than occur today (lots of extinctions).
This was based upon the presence of vessels in some gnetophytes (all other gymnosperms have only tracheids, angiosperms have both tracheids and vessels) and a type of double fertilization seen in Ephedra.
More recently, molecular studies have shown that gymnosperms are monophyletic, thus refuting the anthophyte hypothesis.
www.science.siu.edu /plant-biology/PLB304/Gymnosperms.html   (1295 words)

  
 Gymnosperm description   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Gymnosperms are woody plants that produce seeds, but, unlike the flowering plants (angiosperms), the seeds are not enclosed inside an ovary.
This means that instead of developing inside a fruit, such as a berry or acorn, gymnosperm seeds are more exposed.
In the southeastern United States almost all the native gymnosperms are trees, while the few that are not are shrubs.
www.ibiblio.org /pic/GymnospKey/gymnosperm_description.html   (154 words)

  
 Plant Diversity - Gymnosperms and Angiosperms
Be able to describe the similarity and difference in the life cycles of gymnosperms and angiosperms.
Gymnosperms:  The gymnosperm group includes the Ginkgophyta, Gnetophyta, Cycadophyta, and Coniferophyta phyla.
The sporophyte generation dominates the life cycle of angiosperms and is similar to the gymnosperms except that angiosperms completely enclose the developing ovules (seed) within the ovary.
dbs.umt.edu /courses/biol103/labs/Wyrick/10b_plant_diversity_gymnosperms_angiosperms.htm   (1876 words)

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