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Topic: Habsburg Spain


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  Habsburg Spain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Spain's 16th century maritime supremacy was demonstrated by the victory over the Ottomans at Lepanto in 1571 (which was symbolically important to the Spanish), and then after the setback of the Spanish Armada in 1588, in a series of victories against England in the Anglo-Spanish War of 1585-1604.
Her husband Philip was the Habsburg son of the Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I and Mary of Burgundy and simultaneously became king-consort Philip I of Castile.
Spain was not yet at peace, as the aggressive Henry II of France came to the throne in 1547 and immediately renewed the conflict with Spain.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Habsburg_Spain   (6982 words)

  
 Spain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Spain is a parliamentary monarchy, with a hereditary monarch and a bicameral parliament, the Cortes Generales.
Spain is bound to the east by Mediterranean Sea (containing the Balearic Islands), to the north by the Bay of Biscay and to its west by the Atlantic Ocean, where the Canary Islands off the African coast are found.
Spain became a unified crown with the union of Castile and Aragon and the conquest of Granada in 1492, and the annexation of Navarre in 1515.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Spain   (7959 words)

  
 Habsburg Spain information - Search.com
However during the middle decades of the 17th century Habsburg Spain's maritime power went into a long decline with mounting defeats against the United Provinces and then England; that by the 1660s it was struggling grimly to defend its overseas possessions from pirates and privateers.
On land Habsburg Spain became embroiled in the vast Thirty Years' War, and in the second half of the 17th century the Spanish were defeated by the French, led by King Louis XIV.
Habsburg rule came to an end in Spain with the death in 1700 of Charles II which resulted in the War of the Spanish Succession.
www.search.com /reference/Habsburg_Spain   (7000 words)

  
 The History Cooperative | Conference Proceedings | Seascapes, Littoral Cultures, and Trans-Oceanic Exchanges | The ...
The Habsburgs had strong family ties in Portugal, dating from royal marriages in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and the early decades of the dual monarchy seem to have gone fairly smoothly.
Spain and France had been antagonists since the late fifteenth century, and Louis XIV launched one war after another against Habsburg territories in Europe and abroad from 1672 to 1697.
In sum, I would argue that the strength and resiliency of Habsburg imperial administration resided in strong ties of loyalty and reciprocity between the monarchy and its subjects, and that those ties emerged from social, legal, and political structures in Iberia that were carried around the globe.
www.historycooperative.org /proceedings/seascapes/phillips.html   (7951 words)

  
 Habsburg Spain -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-24)
Spain's maritime supremacy was demonstrated by the victory over the Ottomans at the Lepanto in 1571 (which was symbolically important to the Spanish), and then after the massive setback of the Spanish Armada in 1588, in a series of victories against England in the Anglo-Spanish War of 1585-1604.
However during the middle decades of the 17th century Habsburg Spain's maritime power went into a long decline with mounting defeats against the United Provinces and then England, that by the 1660s it was struggling to defend its overseas possessions from pirates and privateers.
On land, Spain became embroiled in the vast Thirty Years' War, and in the second half of the 17th century the Spanish were defeated by the French, led by King Louis XIV.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/Habsburg_Spain   (6880 words)

  
 Spain -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-24)
Habsburg policies that had entrenched the privileges and exemptions of the nobility from the time of the Castilian War of the Communities of 1518-1520, and the vast grants of land to the Church, also played an important part in eventually undermining the economy and the curtailing of the spread of modern thought.
Spain is a constitutional monarchy, with a hereditary monarch and a bicameral parliament, the Cortes Generales or National Assembly.
Spain is, at present, what is called a State of Autonomies, formally unitary but, in fact, functioning as a Federation of Autonomous Communities, each one with different powers (for instance, some have their own educational and health systems, others do not) and laws.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/Spain   (8090 words)

  
 30YW western europe   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-24)
Phillip III of Spain attempted to continue the foreign policy aspirations of his father, Phillip II, which essentially meant that Spain had to be kept on a war footing.
Spain was on her southern border and the Spanish Netherlands had been on her north-east border.
To ensure that the focus of the Habsburgs was split, the Dutch encouraged the growing problems in Bohemia where the people of Bohemia were in the process of rising up against their Austrian Habsburg masters.
www.historylearningsite.co.uk /30YW_western_europe.htm   (1244 words)

  
 Iberian Peninsula, 1400-1600 A.D. | Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-24)
Spain is given rights of commerce and colonization to lands west of this line, while Portugal is granted the territories to the east.
Holy Roman Emperor (from 1519) and king of Spain (from 1516), Charles V resigns the crown, formally abdicating as emperor in 1558.
He suppresses Muslim revolts in Spain, but is less successful in his attempts to tighten control over the Netherlands, where he establishes the Inquisition in response to violent waves of iconoclasm and overwhelming support for the Reformation.
www.metmuseum.org /toah/ht/08/eusi/ht08eusi.htm   (1997 words)

  
 Information about Habsburg Spain
During the reign of Emperor Charles V (Carlos I of Spain), who ascended the thrones of the kingdoms of Spain after the death of his grandfather Ferdinand, Habsburg Spain controlled territory ranging from Philippines to the Netherlands, and was, for a time, Europe's greatest power.
Spain as we know it today did not come into being until the death of Charles II and with him the extinction Hapsburg Dynasty, and the ascention of Phillip V and the inaguration the Burbourn Dynasty and its reforms.
Spain made a fair recovery during the truce, ordering her finances and doing much to restore her prestige and stability in the run-up to the last truly great war in which she would play as a leading power.
english.turkcebilgi.com /Habsburg_Spain   (7736 words)

  
 Habsburg Spain - Definition, explanation
During the reign of Emperor Charles V (Carlos I of Spain), who ascended the thrones of the kingdoms of Spain after the death of his grandfather Ferdinand, Habsburg Spain controlled territory ranging from Argentina to the Netherlands, and was among Europe's greatest powers.
Spain's maritime supremacy was demonstrated by the victory over the Ottomans at the Lepanto in 1571 (which was symbolically important to the Spanish), but in the following decades they suffered defeat at sea against England and the United Provinces.
On land, Spain became embroiled in the Thirty Years' War, and in the second half of the 17th century the Spanish were defeated by the French, led by King Louis XIV.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/h/ha/habsburg_spain.php   (6781 words)

  
 Spain: history of spain
The Muslim community in Spain was itself diverse and beset by social tensions, which ultimately was one of the principle causes of the fall of Al-Andalus.
With the union of Castille and Aragon in 1479 and the subsequent incorporation of Navarre in 1512, the word Spain (España, in Spanish) began being used only to refer to the new unified kingdom and not to the whole of Hispania (the term Hispania is Latin and the term Iberia Greek).
Until the late fifteenth century, Castile and Léon, Aragon and Navarre were independent states, with independent languages, monarchs, armies and, in the case of Aragon and Castile, two empires: the former with one in the Mediterranean and the latter with a new, rapidly growing, one in the Americas.
winelib.com /wiki/Spain   (3510 words)

  
 Ancestors and Family of Philip II of Spain Habsburg
Philip II (of Spain), Habsburg king of Spain who ruled the country at the height of its power and influence and used that power in the service of the Roman Catholic church and the Counter Reformation.
Before succeeding to the throne of Spain upon his father's abdication in 1556, Philip had already received the duchy of Milan (1540), the kingdoms of Naples and Sicily (1554), and the Netherlands (1555) from his father.
Philip married Maria of Portugal, daughter of John III of Portugal and Katherina Habsburg, on 12 Nov 1543 in Salamanca,, Castilla y León, Spain.
nygaard.howards.net /files/3/3271.htm   (818 words)

  
 Austria - The Turkish Wars and the Siege of Vienna   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-24)
In 1663 rivalries between the Ottomans and the Habsburgs in Transylvania triggered renewed fighting between the Ottoman Empire and the Habsburg Empire.
Spain's steady decline throughout the seventeenth century had already led to minor armed conflicts aimed at a realignment of power among European countries, and these rivalries blossomed into the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-14).
The strong central government and political institutions of France made the possible union of Spain and France a far greater threat to other European countries than the possible union of Spain and the Habsburg lands in Central Europe.
countrystudies.us /austria/15.htm   (417 words)

  
 [No title]
Make Istria a Habsburg province in 1492; it should not be considered a Venetial national province, as that would give Venice a permanent CB on Habsburg.
Euskadia was conquered by Spain in 1515, and the kingdom was finally absorbed into France in 1589 when Henry IV of Navarra acceded to the throne.
Since Navarra is a French vassal, Spain can use this CB without declaring war on France only if it is already at war with France (historically this was the case).
grognard.com /variants1/europavar.txt   (1883 words)

  
 About Felipe II De HABSBURG (King of Spain)
Felipe received the Duchy of Milan from his father in 1540 and, on the occasion of his marriage in 1554 to Mary Tudor, Queen of England, who was eleven years his senior, the Kingdoms of Naples and Sicily.
The Moriscoes of the ancient Kingdom of Granada had been conquered, but they remained the implacable enemies of their conquerors, from whom they were separated by religion, language, dress, and manners, and they plotted incessantly with the Mussulmans outside the country.
He had safeguarded the religious unity of Spain and had exterminated heresy in the southern Low Countries, but the northern Low Countries were lost to him forever.
www.tudorplace.com.ar /aboutFelipeII.htm   (1973 words)

  
 hapsburgs   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-24)
If Spain lost Lombardy, communications in Germany and the Netherlands would become impossible; any weakness or defeat in these three areas would greatly affect the others.
Spain was Catholic and wanted to be rid of Muslims and Jews (both pretty much gone from Spain by Philip’s reign).
  Spain had the money, resources and land possible to be one of the greatest and largest empires in all of history but it lacked a central intelligence organization to design and follow out strategic plans.
storm.simpson.edu /~proctorn/STRATEGY-2005_files/murray5.htm   (819 words)

  
 Chapter 13: A History of Spain and Portugal
The expenses in manpower and money were so great that the resources of Spain and the Habsburg principalities of Europe would not have sufficed had it not been for the increased flow of precious metals from America by the middle of Carlos's reign.
By the beginning of the seventeenth century, the seven northern provinces that made up rebel Holland were on their way to becoming economically and technologically the most dynamic part of western Europe, combining the maritime enterprise and daring of the Portuguese of an earlier period with the economic acumen of the Germans and north Italians.
Holland presented an increasing contrast to Spain itself, which had developed an almost closed society during the sixteenth century and under the burden of war, taxes, and its own social values was no longer able to expand economically.
libro.uca.edu /payne1/payne13.htm   (8447 words)

  
 The Art And Power Of Spain To Come Alive With Lecture At Meadows Museum
In his lecture, Professor Elliott will discuss how the Habsburg kings of Spain, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, used visual imagery to send political messages about their dynasty and about the character and aspirations of Spain's monarchy and empire.
He will pay particular attention to the first two Habsburg kings of Spain, Charles V and Philip II, but will follow their innovations in the use of art as a means of showing power into the seventeenth century.
Professor Elliott's books include Imperial Spain, The Revolt of the Catalans, The Count Duke of Olivares, Richelieu and Olivares, The Old World and the New, and A Palace for a King: the Buen Retiro and the Court of Philip IV.
www.smu.edu /newsinfo/releases/01020.html   (411 words)

  
 Sidney Donnell Will Talk about “Drag Performance and Habsburg Spain” Today
Free and open to the public, the talk, titled “Drag Performance and Habsburg Spain,” is the spring 2004 Jones Faculty Lecture.
Since the Spanish stage during the Habsburgs maintained a long-standing tradition of transvestite performance, it is a literary genre connected to cultural anxiety surrounding the potential feminization of Imperial Spain's masculine self-image, according to Donnell.
He examines changes in attitudes and actual staging practices, especially the sudden shift from the customary all-male casts whose members specialized in feminine roles during much of the 16th century, and the abrupt adoption of what today might be called “gender-appropriateness” on the late 16th- and early 17th-century stage.
www.lafayette.edu /news.php/view/5137   (723 words)

  
 Personaggi Celebri   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-24)
Capitano Generale of Catalogna appointed by Philip III Habsburg of Spain, in 1609 in Valencia was a major player in driving out of Spain the Moors.
When he returned in Spain was appointed in 1616 member of the Supreme Council of the King Philip III of Spain.
He died in 1622 under the Reign of Philip IV Habsburg of Spain.
www.pignatelli.org /famousmembers.htm   (161 words)

  
 H-Net Review: Jeffrey Vanke on The Lion and the Eagle: Interdisciplinary Essays on German-Spanish Relations over the ...
Spain and Germany, though almost never as closely bound to each other as to others, have occasionally borne bountiful fruit from their encounters.
A notable exception was the installation of Austrian Habsburg Charles V as King Charles I of Spain, in 1516.
With Spain's later eclipse by France, the eighteenth century witnessed diminished mutual awareness by Spaniards and Germans.
www.h-net.org /reviews/showrev.cgi?path=93511017848480   (1676 words)

  
 Pretenders   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-24)
In 1580 the Portuguese Royal House failed, and the state was attached by Habsburg Spain.
Based on the fact that Frederick II held Sicily and southern Italy, a claim that was assumed by his illegitimate son Manfred, the Kingdom of Naples has normally included Jerusalem as a adjunct title within its collection.
Maximilian and his wife were childless, and thus in 1865 they officially adopted as their heirs the scions of the House of Iturbide, thereby unifying both monarchic traditions under a single successor.
www.hostkingdom.net /pretends.html   (6464 words)

  
 Genealogy notes/links on Prince Baltasar Carlos Hapsburg by Carol Sutton
Child 2: Habsburg, Charles II of Spain, King of Spain, b.
Father: Habsburg, Philip III of Spain, King of Spain, b.
Child 3: Habsburg, Charles II of Spain, King of Spain, b.
www.carolsutton.net /breda/baltasar_carlos_genealogy.html   (424 words)

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