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Topic: Hanseatic


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In the News (Thu 22 Aug 19)

  
 Hanseatic League - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Hanseatic League (German: die Hanse) was an alliance of trading cities that established and maintained a trade monopoly over most of Northern Europe and the Baltic for a time in the later Middle Ages and the Early Modern period (ie between the 13th and 17th century).
The origins of the League are generally seen as the foundation of the new town of Lübeck in 1158/9 after the capture of the area by Henry the Lion of Saxony.
In fact, at the height of its power in the late 1300s, the merchants of the Hanseatic League were able to use their economic clout (and sometimes their military might - trade routes needed protecting, and the League's ships were well-armed) to influence Imperial policy.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Hanseatic_League   (1916 words)

  
 i-Friesland history: The Hanseatic League
As tax revenues started to flow from the free towns in the Hanseatic alliance to emperors and dukes, the merchants were in a position to influence the lords to pass laws to protect the Hansa cargoes.
Hanseatic merchants established counting houses - or beurs - in four different cities: Novogorod in Russia, Bergen in Norway, the Steel Yard in London, and Bremen in Flanders.
Indeed the cities of Hamburg, Lubeck, and Bremen continued to be known as Hanseatic cities until the end of the 19th century.
www.i-friesland.com /Hanseatic_League.htm   (980 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Hanseatic League
The Steelyard, from the German Stalhof, was in the Middle Ages the main trading base of the Hanseatic League in London.
The Peace of Westphalia See also: Peace of Westphalia It was the exploits of Axel Oxenstierna and Johan Banér which alone enabled Sweden to obtain even what she did obtain at the great Peace of Westphalia congress in 1648.
Wismar Coat of Arms Wismar is a smaller port and Hanseatic League city in northern Germany on the Baltic Sea, in the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, about 45 km due east of Lübeck, and 30 km due north of Schwerin.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Hanseatic-League   (6444 words)

  
 Prof. Rainer Postel, The Hanseatic League and its Decline
In the Hanseatic reply the Lübeck syndic stated that the Hansa was neither a society nor a corporation, it owned no joint property, no joint till, no executive officials of their own; it was a tight alliance of many towns and communities to pursue their respective own trading interests securely and profitably.
So there was a smaller circle of Hanseatic towns that took part in trade, were invited to the meetings and influenced their decisions, and a wider circle, whose merchants also benefited from Hanseatic privileges.
In order to reestablish Hanseatic trade and privileges, which suffered many losses during the war, it was their aim to explicitly include the Hansa in the peace treaty finally sealed in 1648.
www.unibw-hamburg.de /PWEB/hisfrn/hanse.html   (5226 words)

  
 Hanseatic League   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Hanseatic League attempted to protect its ship convoys and caravans by quelling pirates and brigands, and it fostered safe navigation by building lighthouses and training pilots.
The league's members raised an armed force that defeated the Danes decisively in 1368, and in the Peace of Stralsund (1370) Denmark was forced to recognize the league's supremacy in the Baltic.
Lithuania and Poland were united in 1386; Denmark, Sweden, and Norway formed a union in 1397; and Ivan III of Moscow closed the Hanseatic trading settlement at Novgorod in 1494.
www.hfac.uh.edu /gbrown/philosophers/leibniz/BritannicaPages/HanseaticLeague/HanseaticLeague.html   (869 words)

  
 Hanseatic League -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Lübeck would become a central node in all the seatrade that linked the (An arm of the North Atlantic between the British Isles and Scandinavia; oil was discovered under the North Sea in 1970) North Sea and the Baltic.
(A region on the Baltic that is divided between northern Estonia and southern Latvia) Livonia (presently Estonia and Latvia) had its own Hanseatic parliament (diet), and all of its major towns were members of the Hanseatic League.
In fact, at the height of its power in the late (Click link for more info and facts about 1300s) 1300s, the merchants of the Hanseatic League were able to use their economic clout (and sometimes their military might—trade routes needed protecting, and the League's ships were well-armed) to influence Imperial policy.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/h/ha/hanseatic_league.htm   (885 words)

  
 Norway: Hanseatic Museum - Hanseatisk Museum - Attractions and Events in Bergen, Norway - Museums in Bergen, Norway - ...
The Hanseatics were unmarried and had to live in celibacy as long as they lived in the area.
The Hanseatic Museum shows us what one of these trade houses would be like in the last years of the German Office at Bryggen.
The building which houses the Hanseatic Museum was built after a large fire in 1702 which destroyed almost the entire town.
www.bergen-guide.com /51.htm   (654 words)

  
 Lubeck, Germany
Lubeck, once the former "Queen of the Hanseatic League", is today a modern city enclosed by historic walls.
Lubeck´s trading power was consolidated by the foundation of the Hanseatic League in the middle of the 14th century.
The Hanseatic League had no fleet, but they could show up with their impressive ships wherever diplomacy and the persuasive powers of money would not suffice.
worldfacts.us /Germany-Lubeck.htm   (2923 words)

  
 Hanseatic League on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
internal dissension, curtailment of freedom by the German princes, growth of centralized foreign states and consequent loss of Hanseatic privileges, advances of Dutch and English shipping, and various changes in trade all operated against the league.
The last diet was held in 1669, but the league was never formally dissolved.
Lübeck, Hamburg, and Bremen are still known as Hanseatic cities.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/H/Hanseati.asp   (549 words)

  
 TGOL - Empress of Japan/Empress of Scotland/Hanseatic
Heavily rebuilt, the Empress of Scotland emerged as the German liner Hanseatic in 1958.
Hanseatic had soon earned a loyal following as one of the finest West German liners, and she continued her North Atlantic service in the summers, while doing cruises during the off-season.
Hanseatic’s machinery was severely damaged though, and the ship was forced to leave New York under tow of the Bugsier tugs Atlantic and Pacific on September 23
www.greatoceanliners.net /empressofjapan2.html   (1556 words)

  
 Hanseatic Town of Visby - National Heritage Board   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
It is a typical Hanseatic town with a ring-wall, a well-preserved street grid, and buildings from the Middle Ages onwards.
When the Hanseatic League acquired a firm organization in the mid-fourteenth century, Visby was given the leadership of the north-eastern towns.
The Hansa was a political and commercial league of German merchants and towns in the North Sea and Baltic area.
www.raa.se /varveng/visbye.asp   (468 words)

  
 The Hanseatic League in the Eastern Baltic
Since there were no navies to protect their cargoes, no international bodies to regulate tariffs and trade, and few ports had regulatory authorities to manage their use, the merchants banded together to establish tariff agreements, provide for common defense and to make sure ports were safely maintained.
At its peak, the Hanseatic League covered the entire North Sea and Baltic Sea Regions and it stretched hundreds of miles inland along rivers from the Rhine to the Daugava.
The Hanseatic League had "no executive officials of their own" and "no common council," according to one scholar, and the League deliberately evaded classification as a society or corporation, in part to avoid legal action against the League
depts.washington.edu /baltic/papers/hansa.html   (2547 words)

  
 THE HANSEATIC LEAGUE
The Hanseatic League was not so much a league of cities as it was a league of merchant associations within the cities of Northern Germany and the Baltic.
In the case of the Hanseatic league the impetus for its formation was trade along the Kiel "salt road".
When a canal was built from near Hamburg to Lubeck the salt trade shifted from the road to the cheaper canal route, and the Hamburg merchants who controlled the canal replaced the Kiel merchants in their position of importance in the salt trade.
members.bellatlantic.net /%7Ebaronfum/hansa.html   (2217 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Hanseatic League (German History) - Encyclopedia
Hanseatic League[han´´sEat´ik, han´´zE–] Pronunciation Key, mercantile league of medieval German towns.
It was amorphous in character; its origin cannot be dated exactly.
LUbeck, Hamburg, and Bremen are still known as Hanseatic cities.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/H/Hanseati.html   (488 words)

  
 HANSEATIC
The "Hanseatic" is a ice strengthened cruise vessel operated by Bunnys Adventure and Cruise Shipping Co. Ltd and is registered at Nassau in the Bahamas.
Note: The "Hanseatic" called into Port Stanley in the Falkland Islands on the 22nd of December 1999 and was scheduled to call again on the 9th January 2000.
The Hanseatic is shown at right at Juan Fernandez Island on the 1st of January 2005.
www.newzeal.com /steve/Ships/hanseatic.htm   (668 words)

  
 ORB --Hanseatic Index   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
List of Hanseatic Cities of the Early Modern Period
The Hanseatic League and its Decline, paper read by Prof.
This file may be copied on the condition that the entire contents, including the header and the copyright notice remain intact.
www.the-orb.net /encyclop/late/central/hanindex.html   (77 words)

  
 The Hanseatic League Historical Re-enactors TM
Though we in Florida were spared the destruction of Hurricane Katrina, we can certainly empathize with our friends and family affected by the storm.
The caravan would also consist of many support personnel such as mercenaries for protection, hunters to provide food, serving wenches, smiths of various vocations, weavers, brewers, shoemakers, and livestock handlers.
Because of the sheer diversity of The Hanseatic League you might also encounter exotic things (for the time period) such as: American Indians, Middle Eastern belly dancers, African Drummers, or Chinese silk weavers.
www.hanseatic-league.com   (291 words)

  
 Hanseatic League, Visby   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The words Hansa and Hanseatic League coincide with the beginning of the downfall of the city.
The second Hansetag in Lübeck 1358 is considered as the time when the Hanseatic League was formed.
A milestone in this new organization was the Cologne Confederation of the Hanseatic League in 1367.
sf.www.lysator.liu.se /nordic/mirror/gutar/Hanse.html   (243 words)

  
 Norway: Hanseatic Assembly Rooms - Schotstuene - Attractions and Events in Bergen, Norway - Attractions in Bergen, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Schotstuene (the Hanseatic Assembly Rooms), as they are today, were originally not adjacent to each other, but were singular houses behind each building (tenement) on Bryggen.
The so-called games with their parties, were initiation rituals held in the assembly room.
All the newcomers to the Hanseatic Office in Bergen had to undergo them in order to become full members of this Hanseatic society.
www.bergen-guide.com /61.htm   (374 words)

  
 Hanseatic League
Hanseatic League, mercantile league of medieval German towns.
Hanseatic League (The Hutchinson Dictionary of World History)
Rise Of The Hanseatic League: Part I. (History of the World)
www.infoplease.com /ce6/history/A0822651.html   (438 words)

  
 Expatica's German news in English: Historic Hanseatic church reopens in Estonia
TARTU, ESTONIA - The historic St. John's Church in the Estonian city of Tartu that dates back to the days when the city was a Hanseatic port was reopened on Wednesday.
Estonian leader Arnold Ruutel and German President Horst Koehler praised the restoration of the church, known as the Jaani Church in Estonia, as a "sign of a living partnership".
The church in the German Hanseatic port of Luebeck donated EUR 1 million.
www.expatica.com /source/site_article.asp?subchannel_id=52&story_id=21520&name=Historic+Hanseatic+church+reopens+in+Estonia   (302 words)

  
 Hanseatic
Denn die HANSEATIC wurde speziell für die polaren Regionen konzipiert und ist der höchsten Eisklasse zugeordnet.
Dort wie auch in den übrigen entlegenen Gegenden der Welt kommen die Zodiacs zum Einsatz, die auf allen Reisen dabei sind.
Die HANSEATIC verfügt über 88 Außenkabinen von jeweils 22m² Größe und vier Suiten von je 44m², welche insgesamt 184 Passagieren Platz bieten.
www.schiffsphoto.de /HTM/Cruise/Hanseatic/Hanseatic.htm   (586 words)

  
 Hanseatic City of Lübeck - UNESCO World Heritage Centre
Hanseatic City of Lübeck - UNESCO World Heritage Centre
Lübeck – the former capital and Queen City of the Hanseatic League – was founded in the 12th century and prospered until the 16th century as the major trading centre for northern Europe.
It has remained a centre for maritime commerce to this day, particularly with the Nordic countries.
whc.unesco.org /en/list/272   (144 words)

  
 Empress of Japan (1930) - Empress of Scotland - Hanseatic - Ocean Liner and Cruise Ship Postcards
Hanseatic (1) spent more time cruising, and only completed eight round voyages in 1965.
After substantial rebuilding into the more modern looking two-funnelled liner Hanseatic (1), services began between Cuxhaven, Havre, Southampton and New York in July 1958.
The Hanseatic (1) was badly damaged by fire in New York on 7th September 1966.
www.simplonpc.co.uk /EmpressOfScotlandPCs.html   (676 words)

  
 MENAFN - Middle East North Africa . Financial Network News: AMMAN — A financial partnership declaration was signed ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Financial Network News: AMMAN — A financial partnership declaration was signed here on Tuesday between the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of Finance of the Free and Hanseatic...
AMMAN — A financial partnership declaration was signed here on Tuesday between the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of Finance of the Free and Hanseatic...
AMMAN — A financial partnership declaration was signed here on Tuesday between the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry of Finance of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg in Germany.
www.menafn.com /qn_news_story_s.asp?StoryId=83275   (393 words)

  
 Assignment on A summary of the hanseatic league
Assignment on A summary of the hanseatic league
Hanseatic League The Hanseatic League was not so much a league of cities as it was a league of merchant associations within the cities of Northern Germany and the Baltic.
The Order became involved in a series of wars against Poland and Lithuania.
www.paperadepts.com /paper/A_summary_of_the_hanseatic_lea-166480.html   (118 words)

  
 Die Hanse
The players, as merchants in the time of the Hanseatic League try to carry salt from Lubeck to commercial ports and exchange them for needed products.
Between the North Sea and the Baltic Sea there is a waterway with the Hanseatic cities Hamburg and Wismar at the ends.
(The Hanseatic cities Hamburg and Wismar are not harbors, they represent the entrance and exit to the canal.) On the canal distance all ships move only one hex per turn, the values on the wind card have no validity here.
www.gamecabinet.com /rules/DieHanse.html   (3626 words)

  
 Hanseatic Town of Visby   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Report of the 19th Session of the Committee
A former Viking site on the island of Gotland, Visby was the main centre of the Hanseatic League in the Baltic from the 12th to the 14th century.
Its 13th-century ramparts and more than 200 warehouses and wealthy merchants' dwellings from the same period make it the best-preserved fortified commercial city in northern Europe.
www.unesco.org /whc/sites/731.htm   (62 words)

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