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Topic: Haredi Judaism


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  Haredi Judaism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Haredi or Charedi Judaism, often referred to as Ultra-Orthodox Judaism, is the most theologically conservative form of Orthodox Judaism.
Haredi Jews, like other Orthodox Jews, consider their belief system and religious practices to extend in an unbroken chain back to Moses and the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai.
The Haredi Jews point out that even such liberals as Theodor Herzl, the founder of modern political Zionism, at one time contemplated the mass conversion of the Jews to Christianity as a means of eliminating anti-Semitism.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Haredi_Judaism   (5429 words)

  
 Judaism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Judaism has seldom, if ever, been monolithic in practice (although it has always been monotheistic in theology), and differs from many religions in that its central authority is not vested in any person or group but rather in its writings and traditions.
Despite this, Judaism in all its variations has remained tightly bound to a number of religious principles, the most important of which is the belief that there is a single, omniscient, omnipotent, omnibenevolent, transcendent God, who created the universe and continues to be involved in its governance.
In Reform Judaism, prayer is often conducted in the vernacular and men and women have equal roles in religious observance.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Judaism   (9732 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Judaism Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
Orthodox Judaism (includes Hasidic Judaism, Haredi (or Ultra-Orthodox) Judaism and Modern Orthodox Judaism) - this denomination holds that the Torah was written by God and Moses, and that the original laws within it are binding and unchanging.
Reform Judaism (outside of the USA also known as Progressive Judaism, and in the U.K. as Liberal Judaism) originally formed in Germany as a reaction to traditional Judaism, stresses integration with society and a personal interpretation of the Torah.
Judaism developed into several distinct denominations in response to this unprecedented phenomenon: Reform Judaism and Liberal Judaism, many forms of Orthodox Judaism, Conservative Judaism, and a number of smaller groups as well.
www.ipedia.com /judaism.html   (5964 words)

  
 The Book of THoTH (Leaves of Wisdom) - Judaism
Judaism has seldom, if ever, been monolithic in practice (although it has been, and continues to be, monotheistic in theology), and differs from many religions in that its central authority is not vested in any person or group but rather in its writings and traditions (known as the Torah).
Despite this, Judaism in all its variations has remained tightly bound to a number of religious principles, the most important of which is the belief in a single, omniscient, omnipotent, omnibenevolent, transcendent God, who created the universe and continues to be involved in its governance.
Judaism does not fit easily into conventional Western categories, such as religion, ethnicity, or culture, in part because most of its 5,000-year history predates the rise of Western culture, or occurred outside of the West.
book-of-thoth.com /thebook/index.php?title=Judaism   (9646 words)

  
 Orthodox Jew - Knowmore   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
Orthodox Judaism is that stream of Judaism which adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonized in the Talmud (Oral Law) and later codified in the Shulkhan Arukh.
Haredi Judaism advocates segregation from non-Jewish culture, although not from non-Jewish society entirely.
According to Orthodox Judaism, Jewish Law today is based on the commandments in the Torah, as viewed through the discussions and debates contained in classical rabbinic literature, especially the Mishnah and the Talmud.
knowmore.org /index.php/Orthodox_Jew   (2365 words)

  
 Judaism
Rabbinic Judaism holds that the Torah is the same one that was given to Moses by God on Mount Sinai.
Orthodox Judaism (includes Hasidic Judaism, Haredi (or Ultra-Orthodox) Judaism and Modern Orthodox Judaism) - this denomination holds that the Torah was written by God and Moses, and that the original laws within it are binding and unchanging.
Judaism developed into several distinct denominations in response to this unprecedented phenomenon: Reform Judaism and Liberal Judaism, many forms of Orthodox Judaism, Conservative Judaism, and a number of smaller groups as well.
www.knowledgefun.com /book/j/ju/judaism.html   (5898 words)

  
 Haredi definition - Zionism and Israel -Encyclopedia / Dictionary/Lexicon of Zionism/Israel/
'Haredi Jewish political parties in Israel lobby for stricter enforcement of religious law according to their interpretation, separation of women and men in public transportation, orthodox religious monopoly on marriage, funerals, Jewish holy places and Kashruth laws, exemptions from military service for Yeshiva students and subsidies for Yeshivah students and Yeshivot.
Haredim are not Zionist, but most Haredi political parties participate in the Israeli government in order to advance their religious political objectives and to obtain public funds for their school systems, Yeshivoth and other charities.
Extreme 'Haredi sects such as Neturei Karteh do not recognize the state of Israel or participate in elections or in the government, and they cooperate with the PLO and enemies of the Israeli state.
www.zionism-israel.com /dic/Haredi.htm   (794 words)

  
 Judaism
Judaism is a complex combination of a religion and a non-exclusive ethnic group.
Although this element is fundamental to Rabbinic Judaism, according to most critical Bible scholars the Torah often implies that the early Israelites accepted the existence of other gods.
Orthodox Judaism (includes Hasidic Judaism, Haredi Judaism or Ultra-Orthodox Judaism and Modern Orthodox Judaism) - this denomination holds that the Torah was written by God and Moses, and that the original laws within it are binding and unchanging.
www.nelsal.com /judaism.htm   (1683 words)

  
 Jewish Fundamentalism In Israel--the eugenic state.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
Structure similar to the Haredi was common in Jewish communities from the second century of the common era until the abolition of Jewish communal autonomy in modem nation states.
Haredi parties, in their attempt to preserve an ancient Jewish regime, have to date constituted a political backlash directed against the tide of modernity that engulfed the NRP.
Haredi political success can best be measured by the amounts of money the two Haredi parties were able to obtain from the state through so-called "special money" grants, not subject to fiscal controls of the state.
home.comcast.net /~neoeugenics/Shahak.htm   (19228 words)

  
 Myswizard » Judaism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
Despite this fact, Judaism in all its variations has remained tightly bound to a number of religious principles, the most important of which is the belief in a single, omniscient, omnipotent, and omnibenevolent, transcendent God who created the universe, and continues to be involved in its governance.
Orthodox Judaism holds that the Torah was written by God and dictated to Moses, and that the laws within it are binding and unchanging.
In Reform Judaism, prayer is often conducted in the vernacular and men and women have equal roles in religious observance.Reconstructionist Judaism started as a stream of philosophy by a rabbi within Conservative Judaism, and later became an independent movement emphasizing reinterpreting Judaism for modern times.
www.myswizard.com /2005/12/18/judaism   (8264 words)

  
 Jewish Political Studies Review Abstracts - Volume 8, Numbers 1-2 (Spring 5756/1996)
Haredi, or so-called "ultra-Orthodox," Jewry contends that it is the most strict and therefore the most authentic expression of Jewish Orthodoxy.
Its authenticity is insured by the devotion and loyalty of its adherents to its leading sages or gedolim, "great ones." In addition to the requirements of explicit Jewish law, and, on occasion, in spite of those requirements, the Haredi adherent obeys the Daas Torah, or Torah views of his or her gedolim.
According to Haredi Judaism, the culture which Eastern European Jewry has created to safeguard the Torah must be guarded so that the Torah observance enshrined in that culture is not violated.
www.jcpa.org /jpabsp96.htm   (880 words)

  
 Daat Torah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Literally, "Knowledge of Torah") is an important basic concept in present-day Jewish Haredi society.
Kaplan 1980) that with the rise of modernity and the wider availability of secular knowledge (and a reduction of commitment to religion), various groups, including groups within the "Orthodox" world, raised challenges to the exclusive leadership role of the rabbis.
These theorists suggest that to some degree, this generated a backlash in the Haredi world, intensifying the Daat Torah concept to imply near infallibility for gedolim.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Daat_Torah   (486 words)

  
 judaism jews
In polythestic religions, humankind is often created by accident, and the gods are primarily concerned with their relations with other gods, not with people.
Orthodox Jews hold that these principles are unchanging and mandatory; non-Orthodox forms of Judaism hold that these principles have evolved over time, and thus allow for more leeway in what individual adherents believe.
This portion of the population largely ignores or avoids ignores organized religious life, be it of the official Israeli rabbinate (Orthodox) or of the liberal movements common to diaspora Judaism (Reform, Conservative).
www.findthelinks.com /Religion/judaism.htm   (1482 words)

  
 [No title]
Consequently, within the world of Hasidic Judaism and Haredi Judaism, the English word and title of "Rabbi" for anyone is often-times scorned and derided.
The seminary of Reform Judaism is the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion.
The Union for Traditional Judaism (UTJ) has a seminary in New Jersey; the seminary is accepted by all non-Orthodox rabbis as a valid, traditional rabbinical seminary.
www.seedwiki.com /wiki/conj/becoming_a_rabbi?wpid=336610   (1400 words)

  
 Haredi Judaism - Wikipedia Light!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
As a result, they consider non-Orthodox denominations to be unjustifiable deviations from authentic Judaism, both because of other denominations' dubiety concerning verbal revelation of Written and Oral Torah, and because of their rejection of Halakhic (or Jewish legal) precedent as binding.
Many Haredi poskim (authorities in Jewish law) have spoken out against watching television or films, reading secular newspapers and using the internet for non-business purposes.
They were joined in the 1950 by entire communities of North African and Middle Eastern Jews (especially from Morocco, Iraq, Tunisia, Yemen, etc.), who were kept marginalized and encouraged (in some cases, even forced) to forego their traditional cultures for the dominant European secular one.
godseye.com /wiki/index.php?title=Haredi   (5195 words)

  
 Israel - The Role of Judaism
But the opposite is true; traditional Judaism has been playing a more dominant role since the late 1960s and affecting more of the political and economic dimensions of everyday life.
In the nineteenth century, Zionism often competed with Orthodox Judaism for the hearts and minds of young Jews, and enmity existed between Orthodox Jews of Eastern Europe and the Zionists (and those residing in Palestine in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries).
Thus, secular Zionism and religious Judaism are inextricably linked, and hence the conceptual ambivalence and paradoxes of enmity and attraction.
countrystudies.us /israel/43.htm   (657 words)

  
 Hasidic Judaism at AllExperts
Although traditional Judaism had adopted some features of Kabbalah, it adapted them to fit its own system: it added to its own ritualism the asceticism of the "practical cabalists" of the East, who saw the essence of earthly existence only in fasting, in penance, and in spiritual sadness.
Hasidic Judaism eventually became the way of life of the majority of Jews in Ukraine, Galicia, and central Poland; the movement also had sizable groups of followers in Belarus-Lithuania and Hungary.
Hasidic men and women, as customary in Haredi Judaism, usually meet through matchmakers in a process called a shidduch, but marriages involve the mutual consent of the couple and of the parents.
en.allexperts.com /e/h/ha/hasidic_judaism.htm   (4545 words)

  
 Chapter 2: The Rise of the Haredim in Israel by Israel Shahak and Norton Mezvinsky
The first Jewish dissenters from Judaism in modern times rebelled against this type of education and became principled opponents of the religion that from their perspectives tried to subject them to such totalitarian controls.
Many Haredi rabbis, for example, assert that the Holocaust, including most particularly the deaths of one-and-a-half million Jewish children, was a well-deserved divine punishment, not only for all the sins of modernity and faith renunciation by many Jews, but also for the decline of Talmudic study in Europe.
The theocratic, totalitarian nature of the Haredi demand for the Halacha to be the binding law of the State of Israel is obvious.
members.tripod.com /alabasters_archive/rise_of_haredim.html   (8476 words)

  
 Azure
Haredi Judaism, regardless of its particular faction, objects to Jews entering the cultural fray of the modern West, studying in its institutions, revering its leaders, fighting in its wars, or partaking of its cultural bounty.
Haredi values-from the requirement to contemplate the Tora day and night to the prohibition on gossip-cannot, by their very nature, be upheld fully, at least by most people.
Haredi society is characterized by vitality and moral strength precisely because it wholeheartedly believes in its holy mission-the preservation of Jewish existence-and is willing to sacrifice many things that the “enlightened” man views as crucial to daily life.
www.azure.org.il /magazine/popUp_print.asp?ID=307&member_Id=   (9821 words)

  
 [No title]
Hasidic Judaism (from the Hebrew: Chasidut חסידות, meaning "pious", from the Hebrew root word [C]hesed חסד meaning "loving kindness") is a Haredi Jewish religious movement.
Broadly, the subgroups of Orthodoxy comprise Modern Orthodox Judaism, Haredi Judaism, and Hasidic Judaism.
Religious Zionism, characterized by belief in the importance of the modern state of Israel to Judaism, often intersects with Modern Orthodoxy.
lycos.cs.cmu.edu /info/hasidic-judaism.html   (452 words)

  
 Important.ca Judaism, List of Jewish Denonminations
Outside of the USA it is known as Masorti (Hebrew for "Traditional") Judaism.
Many religious Jews do not look at one's denomination as a valid way of designating Jews; instead, if they label Jews it is on a graduated spectrum of religious observance.
The former term includes what is called "Religious Zionism" or the "National Religious" community, as well as what has become known over the past decade or so as haredi-leumi (nationalist haredi), which combines a largely haredi lifestyle with nationist ideology.
www.important.ca /jewish_judaism_denominations.html   (934 words)

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