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Topic: Harold Clayton Urey


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In the News (Wed 20 Mar 19)

  
  Harold Urey Biography | World of Chemistry
In 1934 Harold Urey was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry for his discovery of deuterium, an isotope, or species, of hydrogen in which the atoms weigh twice as much as those in ordinary hydrogen.
Urey continued his research on isotopes over the next three decades, and during World War II his experience with deuterium proved invaluable in efforts to separate isotopes of uranium from each other in the development of the first atomic bombs.
Harold Clayton Urey was born in Walkerton, Indiana, on April 29, 1893.
www.bookrags.com /biography/harold-urey-woc   (183 words)

  
 Harold Clayton Urey
Urey won the 1934 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and the American Chemical Society Gibbs Medal, for this discovery.
Urey detected deuterium by its predicted spectrum in a discharge through the gas of this concentrated residue.
Urey was a son of small town, pre-industrial America; he once told colleagues that the first time he saw an automobile was at age 17 in rural Montana.
www.columbia.edu /cu/chemistry/groups/brus/urey.html   (706 words)

  
 Harold Clayton Urey
He taught at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (1924-29), and at Columbia University (1929-45); was professor of chemistry at the Institute for Nuclear Studies (1945-52) and Ryerson professor of chemistry (1952-58) at the University of Chicago; and served as professor-at-large (1958-70) and as professor emeritus of chemistry (1970-81) at the University of California at San Diego.
Urey's group provided the fundamental information for the separation of the fissionable isotope uranium-235 from the more abundant isotope uranium-238 through the use of gaseous diffusion, and they also investigated methods for concentrating heavy hydrogen and separating boron isotopes.
Urey suggested that the planets of the solar system may have derived from a gaseous disk rotating about the Sun and that the disk, in combination with gases from the Sun, may have broken into fragments and begun to condense.
peace.nobel.brainparad.com /harold_clayton_urey.html   (513 words)

  
 Harold Urey:
Harold Clayton Urey (April 29, 1893 – January 5, 1981) was a physical chemist whose pioneering work on isotopes earned him the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1934 and later led him to theories of planetary evolution.
Urey was born in Walkerton, Indiana to Reverend Samuel Clayton Urey and Cora Rebecca Riensehl.
At Berkeley, Urey was influenced by the work of physicist Raymond T. Birge and soon joined Niels Bohr in Copenhagen to work on atomic structure at the Institute for Theoretical Physics.
advantacell.com /wiki/Harold_Urey   (704 words)

  
 Register of Harold Clayton Urey Papers - MSS 0044
Born in Walkerton, Indiana, on April 29, 1893, Harold Urey was the son of Samuel Clayton and Cora Rebecca (Reinohl) Urey.
Urey himself was concerned with the safety of nuclear power and the need for a national plan to dispose of nuclear wastes.
Photos of Urey are arranged according to the location or group he was visiting, and the date of the photo is stated in the folder title whenever possible.
orpheus.ucsd.edu /speccoll/testing/html/mss0044a.html   (3728 words)

  
 Harold Urey - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Urey was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1934 for this work.
Urey died at La Jolla, California, and is buried in the Fairfield Cemetery in DeKalb County, Indiana.
Urey Prize, awarded for achievement in planetary sciences by the American Astronomical Society.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Harold_Clayton_Urey   (736 words)

  
 Harold Clayton Urey   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
He was the son of Reverand Samuel Urey and Cora Reinoehl.
He later worked on the seperation of uranium isotopes, and more recently, he has been concerned with the measurement of paleotemperatures, the origins of the planets, and chemical problems of the earth.
Harold has won a nobel prize for his discovery of heavy hydrogen.
home.rochester.rr.com /phsbio/hof/urey.html   (190 words)

  
 Urey, Harold Clayton   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
During World War II he was a member of the Manhattan Project, which produced the atomic bomb, and after the war he worked on tritium (another isotope of hydrogen, of mass 3) for use in the hydrogen bomb, but later he advocated nuclear disarmament and world government.
Urey was born in Indiana and educated at Montana State University.
After deuterium, Urey went on to isolate heavy isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulphur.
www.cartage.org.lb /en/themes/biographies/MainBiographies/U/Urey/1.html   (183 words)

  
 Urey Harold Clayton
Harold Clayton Urey (April 29, 1893 – January 5, 1981) was a chemist whose pioneering work on isotopes earned him the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1934 and later led him to theories of planetary evolution.
In autumn 1941, Urey, with G. Pegram, led a diplomatic mission to England to establishing co-operation on development of the atomic bomb.
Named after him are lunar impact crater Urey, asteroid 4716 Urey and the H. Urey Prize, awarded for achievement in planetary sciences by the American Astronomical Society.
www.teachher.com /chemia/urey-clayton.htm   (556 words)

  
 Urey, Harold C. - Component of : Early Ideas in the History of Quantum Chemistry.
The son of a teacher and lay minister, Urey was educated at the University of Montana, where he studied zoology.
Urey established his reputation in 1931 with his isolation of deuterium by fractional distillation.
Urey was made responsible in 1942 for the gaseous diffusion approach, which turned out to be by far the most successful.
www.quantum-chemistry-history.com /Urey1.htm   (928 words)

  
 Urey, Harold Clayton - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
UREY, HAROLD CLAYTON [Urey, Harold Clayton], 1893-1981, American chemist, b.
For his isolation of deuterium (heavy hydrogen) he received the 1934 Nobel Prize in Chemistry; he later isolated heavy isotopes of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and sulfur.
During World War II, Urey took part in the research leading to the production of the atomic bomb; his special work was on methods of separating uranium isotopes and the production of heavy water.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-urey-h1ar.html   (274 words)

  
 Harold C. Urey - Biography
Harold Clayton Urey was born in Walkerton, Indiana, on April 29, 1893, as the son of the Rev. Samuel Clayton Urey and Cora Rebecca Reinsehl, and grandson of pioneers who settled in Indiana.
Professor's Urey's early researches concerned the entropy of diatomic gases and problems of atomic structure, absorption spectra and the structure of molecules.
Professor Urey received the Willard Gibbs Medal (American Chemical Society) in 1934; Davy Medal (Royal Society, London), 1940; Franklin Medal, 1943; Medal for Merit, 1946; Cordoza Award, 1954; Honor Scroll Award (American Institute of Chemists), 1954; Joseph Priestley Award, 1955; Alexander Hamilton Award, 1961; and the J. Lawrence Smith Award (National Academy of Sciences), 1962.
www.nobel.se /chemistry/laureates/1934/urey-bio.html   (644 words)

  
 Harold Urey - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Harold Urey - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Urey, Harold Clayton (1893-1981), American chemist and Nobel laureate, best known for his discovery of deuterium, or heavy hydrogen,
American chemist Harold Urey received the 1934 Nobel Prize in chemistry for his discovery of deuterium, a form of the chemical element hydrogen...
encarta.msn.com /Harold_Urey.html   (95 words)

  
 Harold Clayton Urey (1893-1981)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Harold Clayton Urey was born in the state of Indiana, USA, in April 29th 1893, dying in California, in January 5th 1981.
A graduate of the University of Montana (1917), he was granted a Ph.D. in Chemistry at the University of California (1923), and specialized in atomic physics with Niels Bohr by the University of Copenhagen (1923-1924).
Urey also devoted some time to the problem of the origin of Earth and to the hypothesis of using oxygen-18 to determine prehistoric temperatures.
nautilus.fis.uc.pt /st2.5/scenes-e/biog/b0034.html   (130 words)

  
 Urey Harold Clayton - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Urey Harold Clayton - Search Results - MSN Encarta
In 1931 the American physicist Harold Clayton Urey discovered the hydrogen isotope deuterium and made heavy water from it.
The American chemist Harold Clayton Urey discovered in 1932 the presence in water of a...
uk.encarta.msn.com /Urey_Harold_Clayton.html   (109 words)

  
 Harold C. Urey biography .ms (via CobWeb/3.1 planetlab2.csres.utexas.edu)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Harold Clayton Urey (April 29, 1893 – January 5, 1981) was a chemist whose pioneering work on isotopes earned him the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1934 and later led him to theories of planetary evolution.
On his return to the US in 1924 he taught at Johns Hopkins University, and then at Columbia where he assembled a team of associates that included Rudolph Schoenheimer, David Rittenberg and T. Taylor.
He died at La Jolla, California, and is buried in the Fairfield Cemetery in DeKalb County, Indiana.
harold-clayton-urey.biography.ms.cob-web.org:8888   (375 words)

  
 Anecdote - Harold Clayton Urey - Harold Urey   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Anecdote - Harold Clayton Urey - Harold Urey
While out walking one day, Harold Urey, a Nobel prize-winning chemist famed for his absent-mindedness, ran into a fellow professor.
Urey, Harold Clayton (1893-1981) American chemist, Nobel Prize recipient (Chemistry, 1934) [noted for his discovery of deuterium (heavy hydrogen)]
www.anecdotage.com /index.php?aid=3794   (165 words)

  
 Urey, Harold Clayton
Urey se propose de vérifier cette hypothèse par voie spectroscopique, mais il faut pour cela de l'hydrogène enrichi en isotopes lourds.
A partir de 1945 Urey réoriente ses travaux et applique les résultats qu'il a obtenus dans l'étude des isotopes au domaine de la géochimie et de la cosmochimie.
Urey est mort le 6 janvier 1981 à La Jolla, en Califomie, à l'âge de 87 ans.
cartage.org.lb /fr/themes/Biographies/mainbiographie/U/Urey/Urey.htm   (1142 words)

  
 Harold Clayton Urey Beschreibung in Library - Definition und Buch-Tipp. (via CobWeb/3.1 planetlab2.csres.utexas.edu)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Eine Übersicht der Artikel, die mit dem Thema Harold Clayton Urey verwandt sind finden Sie auf der Seite alle Artikel über Harold Clayton Urey.
Harold Clayton Urey (* 29.04 1893 in Walkerton, † 6.01 1981 in La Jolla) war ein US-amerikanischer Chemiker
Urey erhielt 1934 den Nobelpreis für Chemie "für seine Entdeckung des schweren Wasserstoffes" (des Deuterium).
harold_clayton_urey.know-library.net.cob-web.org:8888   (564 words)

  
 Harold Clayton Urey Winner of the 1934 Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Harold Clayton Urey Winner of the 1934 Nobel Prize in Chemistry
Harold Clayton Urey (Chemistry, Biographies) (submitted by Jackson)
Harold C. Urey Biography from Encyclopedia Britannica (submitted by www.britannica.com)
www.almaz.com /nobel/chemistry/1934a.html   (113 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Harold Clayton Urey (Chemistry, Biography) - Encyclopedia
You are here : AllRefer.com > Reference > Encyclopedia > Chemistry, Biographies > Harold Clayton Urey
Harold Clayton Urey[yoor´E] Pronunciation Key, 1893–1981, American chemist, b.
More articles from AllRefer Reference on Harold Clayton Urey
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/U/Urey-Har.html   (238 words)

  
 Harold Clayton Urey Information Center - Harold Clayton Urey
Harold Clayton Urey Information Center - Harold Clayton Urey
Most importantly, they developed the gaseous Harold Clayton Urey diffusion method to separate uranium-235 from uranium-238.
Back to the top of Harold Clayton Urey.
www.scipeeps.com /Sci-Chemistry_Topics_G_-_Ha/Harold_Clayton_Urey.html   (437 words)

  
 Urey Harold Clayton 1893 Oral history interview with Harold Clayton Urey, 1964 March 24. AIP International Catalog of ...
Urey Harold Clayton 1893 Oral history interview with Harold Clayton Urey, 1964 March 24.
Oral history interview with Harold Clayton Urey, 1964 March 24.
Interview conducted as part of the Archives for History of Quantum Physics (AHQP) project.
www.aip.org /history/catalog/icos/4927.html   (254 words)

  
 Urey Harold E2   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Briggs, Lyman James; Compton, Arthur Holly; Conant, James Bryant; Lawrence, Ernest Orlando; Urey, Harold Clayton
Description:L-R: Urey, Lawrence, Conant, Briggs, Edger Vaughan Murphee, Compton ; standing ; meeting of the S-1 committee which constituted the scientific leadership of the atomic bomb project ; Bohemian Grove, California.
Item ID:Urey Harold E2 The Emilio Segrè Visual Archives is part of the Niels Bohr Library of the Center for History of Physics at the
photos.aip.org /images/catalog/urey_harold_e2.jsp   (111 words)

  
 Harold Clayton Urey Books - Signed, used, new, out-of-print
Harold Clayton Urey Books - Signed, used, new, out-of-print
Your search: Books » Author: Harold Clayton Urey
Portions of book data provided by Muze Inc. Copyright 1995-2006 Muze Inc. For personal use only.
www.alibris.com /search/books/author/Harold_Clayton_Urey   (87 words)

  
 Weber Louis Russell 1901 1989 Notes on Harold Clayton Urey, ca. 1969. AIP International Catalog of Sources   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-19)
Weber Louis Russell 1901 1989 Notes on Harold Clayton Urey, ca.
One Physics Ellipse, College Park, MD 20740, USA
Biographical notes on Harold C. Urey written by Louis Russell Weber.
www.aip.org /history/catalog/icos/6614.html   (66 words)

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