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Topic: Hasidism


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In the News (Tue 18 Dec 18)

  
  Religious Movements Homepage: Hasidism
Hasidism would have continued to be a force in contemporary life had it not been for Nazism
Despite opposition to Hasidism, Hasidic teachings were carried to communities throughout Eastern and Central Europe by Hasidic disciples who had witnessed the new ways and the new miracles at first hand at the court of Dov Ber and later at the Courts of other Rebbes
Martin Buber was a philosopher, storyteller, and scholar of Hasidism.
religiousmovements.lib.virginia.edu /nrms/hasid.html   (4180 words)

  
  Hasidism
Hasidic doctrine explained that peasant love songs and fairy tales were in reality profoundly allegorical religious texts (e.g., the songs that the Levites had sung in the Holy Temple, expressing the love of God and Israel) that were now being "restored" to their proper purpose.
Hasidic prayer was known for its disregard for the technical regulations and ritual formalities imposed by Jewish law, especially the fixed times for prayer.
The cultivation of personal charisma resulted in an immense variety among the individual Hasidic communities, as each was stamped with the imprint of its leaders, emphasizing different aspects of religious piety.
www.ucalgary.ca /~elsegal/363_Transp/Orthodoxy/Hasidism.html   (1514 words)

  
  MyJewishLearning.com - History & Community: Hasidism
The Hasid is the follower of the Zaddik, with the latter being the superior pietist.
Hasidism was, at first, an elitist movement, consisting of a small company of pietists seeking proximity to the Baal Shem Tov in order to be guided by him in the spiritual path.
The description of Hasidism as "mysticism for the masses" ignores the elitist aspects of the movement, but is nonetheless a fair representation of the appeal of Hasidism as it came to be.
www.myjewishlearning.com /history_community/Modern/EarlyModern/Hasidism.htm   (960 words)

  
 Hasidism
Common to all forms of hasidism is the belief that the established institutions of orthodox rabbinic Judaism are not enough.
It is significant, for example, that the Besht, founder of the Hasidic movement, was not himself a rabbi.
But as an important aspect of modern Judaism, the origins of Hasidism are to be traced to 18th century Poland and in particular to Israel Ben Eliezer or, as he came to be known, the Besht, an abbreviation of Baal Shem Tov ("Master of the Divine Name") (c.1700-1760).
philtar.ucsm.ac.uk /encyclopedia/judaism/hasidim.html   (859 words)

  
 MyJewishLearning.com - History & Community: Hasidism's Opponents
Hasidism was attacked by the Mitnaggedim ("opponents"), the rabbis and communal leaders, on the right and by the Maskilim, the followers of the Haskalah movement of enlightenment, on the left.
On the theological level, the Mitnaggedim saw Hasidic panentheism, the doc­trine that all is in God, to be a heretical understanding of  [the biblical phrase] "The whole earth is full of His glory", one which blurs the distinction between good and evil, the holy and the profane, the pure and the impure.
The Hasidic masters were generally opposed to Jews learning foreign languages and adopting any of the mores of Western society, all in direct opposition to the Haskalah, whose main aim was to encourage accommodation to the Gentile world where this did not affect loyalty to the Jewish religion.
www.myjewishlearning.com /history_community/Modern/EarlyModern/Hasidism/Mitnaggedim.htm   (505 words)

  
 Ralph Dumain: "The Autodidact Project": Raphael Mahler: Introduction, Hasidism and the Jewish Enlightenment
Hasidism and the Haskalah, two movements that clashed for the first time in the social and cultural life of the Jewish people at the thresh old of the nineteenth century, were crucial factors in shaping Jewish culture in the modern period.
In Galician Hasidism, the popular nature of the movement was still preserved to a great extent at the beginning of this period in the field of social morality.
This has mistakenly led to the claim that Hasidism was a movement of redemption and, thus, a typical national movement, whereas the Haskalah, in general, did not see the need to emphasize the national element of Judaism and, to a certain extent, was even misled into a tendency to actual assimilation.
www.autodidactproject.org /other/haskalah1.html   (1646 words)

  
 Hasidism - Encyclopedia.com
Hasidism, which stressed the mercy of God and encouraged joyous religious expression through music and dance, spread rapidly.
Since the Holocaust, the main centers of Hasidism are in the United States and Israel.
The most notable Hasidic community in the United States is composed of the followers of the Lubavitcher rebbe, who are noted for their outreach to other Jews as well as for their messianic fervor.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Hasidism.html   (753 words)

  
 Hasidism
In many formulations, however, Hasidism seemed to prefer the simpler symbolisms of the Zohar (the principle Kabbalistic work that was written in northern Spain in the late 13th century) to that of Hayyim Vital (1543-1620), the disciple of Luria who wrote the main body of the Lurianic teachings.
In Hasidism there is a downplaying of the description of the divine catastrophe (referred to as "the breaking of the divine vessels") within the divine world, which originated evil.
Hasidism claims that this action was did because the cosmic space where the world was to evolve could not withstand the full brilliancy of the divine light so God withheld some of it; this was a merciful on God's part the Hasidic literature teaches.
www.themystica.com /mystica/articles/h/hasidism.html   (1096 words)

  
 Hitzei Yehonatan: Lekh Lekha (Hasidism)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The author was, in addition to his own merits, the progenitor of a long and diverse line of Hasidic teachers; his numerous descendants included the founders of such dynasties of Hornistopol, Talner, Trisk, and Apt, as well as Chernobyl itself; they all bear the surname, Twersky.
Hasidism, like any spiritual movement, was troubled by the tension between the spiritual and the physical.
Buber’s own well-known romance with Hasidism (however distorted and misguided some of his interpretations may have been; see the Buber-Scholem debate of the early ‘60s on this subject) suggests that he himself saw things differently.
hitzeiyehonatan.blogspot.com /2005/11/lekh-lekha-hasidism.html   (2479 words)

  
 Hasidism
Many of the Hasidic ideas are based on the Kabbalah, a mystical Jewish tradition.
Hasidism spread against strong opposition throughout Eastern Europe during the 18th and 19th centuries, led by charismatic leaders, the zaddikim.
Hasidic men have the unshaved forelocks (specified in Leviticus 19:27) and dress in the fl suits and fur-fringed broad-brimmed hats of 18th-century European society, a tradition that they conservatively maintain.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0024235.html   (303 words)

  
 Magic, Mysticism, and Hasidism: Introduction
A deeper study of the many hasidic stories revealed to me that it was the influence of these stories, and not hasidic philosophy, that led the masses to join the movement.
For hasidic thinkers, the telling of a story is a religious act, of no less import than the observance of the commandments, the study of Torah, or prayer.
Since most hasidic stories deal with miraculous events, the sources of their motifs and subjects should be sought in the sphere of the magical and mystical Jewish story throughout the generations.
www.storypower.com /hasidic/Articles/Themes_In_Hasidic_Stories/nigal_intro.html   (1254 words)

  
 Hassidism : The spread of Hasidism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Hasidic Judaism eventually became the way of life of the majority of Jews in the Ukraine, Galicia, and central Poland; the movement also had sizable groups of followers in Belorussia-Lithuania and Hungary.
Hasidic Judaism came to Western Europe and then to the United States during the large waves of Jewish emigration in the 1880s.
Elimelech of Lezhinsk affirmed that belief in Tzaddikism is a fundamental doctrine of Hasidism.
www.onelittleangel.com /wisdom/quotes/hassidism.asp?level=3   (245 words)

  
 Hasidism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The seeker begins without presumptions of superhu­man or divine holiness: “humanly holy you shall be unto me” (Hasidism 23), a great place to begin a spiritual journey, especially for a “superstar” weighed down by fanatical devotees with impossible labels such as messiah, Jesus, prince of folk, prophet, savior, the spokesperson for a generation.
The hasid, the pious one, who is further blessed with the gift of song, lifts the prayers of the people with his song, and in Dylan’s case, for his audi­ence, each word holds infinite responsibility, each song surges in the world waves of power and is far-reaching (59).
The hasid seeks to be “healed of teaching without soul,” that his each word may brim with holiness.
home1.gte.net /vze796a4/art2.htm   (3247 words)

  
 The Roots of Chasidism
Hasidism's origin was a tremendous creative leap which continues to evolve, exerting profound influence on Jewish religious life and thought.
At the center of the Hasidic community sits the Rebbe, a revered, righteous sage who serves as an example, as a source of wise counsel and succor, and as spiritual leader of the community.
In yet a further evolution of Hasidism, Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi developed a system in which not only the Rebbe, but also the Hasidim (obviously, to a lesser extent) studied and penetrated the Torah's mysteries so that not only the Hasidim's deeds and passions were spiritually elevated.
www.jewishmag.co.il /49mag/chasidut/chasidut.htm   (3846 words)

  
 Hasidism.info -- a FAQ on Hasidism (Chassidism) Part 1-A of 3
A-1: A Hasidic (Hah-SEE-dik) or Chassidic (with a gutteral CH sound) Jew is a Jew who practices Hasidism (HAH-see-DIZZ-um), which is a form of mystical Orthodox Judaism that began in the 1700's in Eastern Europe.
Hasidic groups themselves are reluctant to release population figures, or even take a census, for many reasons, one of which is, that it is considered bad luck to count people.
In many ways, a Hasidic Rebbe is loosely analagous to a Hindu guru or the abbot of a monastery, in that he is the guide for a group of disciples.
www.pinenet.com /~rooster/hasid1.html   (6032 words)

  
 Hasidism
Hasidic doctrine explained that peasant love songs and fairy tales were in reality profoundly allegorical religious texts (e.g., the songs that the Levites had sung in the Holy Temple, expressing the love of God and Israel) that were now being "restored" to their proper purpose.
Hasidic prayer was known for its disregard for the technical regulations and ritual formalities imposed by Jewish law, especially the fixed times for prayer.
Subsequent generations of Hasidic leadership would be handed down to the principal disciples of the reigning Tzaddik, which in many cases were their own sons.
www.acs.ucalgary.ca /~elsegal/363_Transp/Orthodoxy/Hasidism.html   (1514 words)

  
 Zeek | Hillel Zeitlin: The Foundations of Hasidism | Rabbi Or N. Rose
Therefore, even in Hasidic texts you find many places where holiness and the demonic are spoken of as two opposing forces, as two entities created by the one unique God, which constantly do battle and will continue to do so until in the end of time, when holiness will finally triumph ….
The Hasidic theory of attributes is a theory of the alchemy of the soul.
However, when the sky, stars, sun, and moon are shown to her and it is explained that she was created in the very same place as they were, she raises herself upward [to the heavenly expanse].
www.zeek.net /705zeitlin   (1301 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Hasidism
The son of a provincial Hasidic rabbi (see Hasidism), he moved to Warsaw in the early 1920s and became associated with the city's Yiddish literati.
The term is used repeatedly in the Old Testament and in the Talmud, which asserts that the continued existence of the world is due to the merits of 36 righteous men.
In Hasidism it came to refer to a religious leader who was viewed as a...
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Hasidism&StartAt=1   (828 words)

  
 "Lithuanian Hasidism..."
Hasidism, also called Chassidism, is a Jewish revival movement which originated somewhat to the south of Lithuania, in the sense defined above, in the regions of Podolia and Volhynia.
According to the author, the Hasidic movement was in part a protest against the "fantasies of the pseudo-messiahs." But at the same time, it was a protest against the domination of Jewish life by the rabbinical scholars.
The Hasidic houses of prayer in Vilnius were closed, their writings burnt, and their teachers attacked.
www.lituanus.org /1970/70_4_07.htm   (609 words)

  
 Hasidism.info -- a FAQ on Hasidism (Chassidism) Part 1-A of 3
A-1: A Hasidic (Hah-SEE-dik) or Chassidic (with a gutteral CH sound) Jew is a Jew who practices Hasidism (HAH-see-DIZZ-um), which is a form of mystical Orthodox Judaism that began in the 1700's in Eastern Europe.
Hasidic groups themselves are reluctant to release population figures, or even take a census, for many reasons, one of which is, that it is considered bad luck to count people.
In many ways, a Hasidic Rebbe is loosely analagous to a Hindu guru or the abbot of a monastery, in that he is the guide for a group of disciples.
pinenet.com /~rooster/hasid1.html   (6032 words)

  
 Hebrew College Today - The Inner Spirit of Hasidism in The Rebbe's Daughter
This motive looms large especially in view of the general perception that Hasidism was in a state of decline at the turn of the twentieth century.
In her depiction, her father's hasidic court is an oasis of true religion, a fountain of blessing to the community, indeed to all of eastern European Jewry.
It should be recalled that Hasidism, at least in its early period, was a romantic movement, tending to an intensity, sometimes excessive, of religious emotion and feeling.
www.hebrewcollege.edu /hct/fall-winter_2002-3/insight/index.html   (1279 words)

  
 [No title]
Although contemporary Jews often use the word "Hasid" as a synonym for ultra-Orthodox, Hasidism, a religious movement that arose in eighteenth century Eastern Europe, was originally regarded as revolutionary and religiously liberal.
The text by Graetz, History of the Jews, is important to the story to offer evidence that Hasidic sects are ostracized even within the Jewish community and that, as the outrageous claims that tzaddikim are priests of the devil show, this criticism of Hasidism is in some significant level unjust.
Hasidism is certainly imperfect, but David Malter makes the important point that there is enough to dislike about Hasidism without creating new faults.
www.lycos.com /info/hasidism--hasidic-jews.html?page=3   (567 words)

  
 Silviu Lupascu / Hasidism As Spiritual Love And Story-Telling   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The XVIIIth century Hasidic thought considered that in each person resides a divine quality, which is hidden or screened by the ego.
The Hasidic language of love and life is preserved in the teaching of the master or saint, which unites the community around the theological pillar of his being, and in the charismatic art of the story-telling, which is pouring "that irrational something" (cf.
The Zaddik is the spiritual pole of the community, therefore his personality and his presence irradiate spiritual love and the magic of story-telling toward the members of his community, in order that the community may become animated by the consciousness of the true communion (cf.
www.cloudsmagazine.com /15/Silviu_Lupascu_Hasidism_As_Spiritual_Love_And_Storytelling.htm   (1611 words)

  
 Mystical Origins of Hasidism | Ordo Magni Operis
It discusses the origins and dissemination of hasidism and the literature that facilitated this; the theological basis of hasidism and the mystical significance of the tsadik; the major figures of hasidism; and the complex links to kabbalah and Shabbateanism.
It further states: "The words 'hasid' and 'hasidism' have become so familiar to people interested in the Jewish world that little thought is given to understanding exactly what hasidism is or considering its spiritual and social consequences.
is to present the main characteristics of the hasidic movement and to examine the social implications of its mystical ideas.
www.o-m-o.org /omo/node/42   (478 words)

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