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Topic: Hattusili III


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In the News (Fri 19 Jul 19)

  
  Peace Treaty between Ramesses II and Hattusili III
It is concluded that Reamasesa-mai-amana, the Great King, the king (of the land of Egypt) with Hattusili, the Great King, the king of the land of Hatti, his brother, for the land of Egypt and the land of Hatti, in order to establish a good peace and a good fraternity forever among them.
Look, the son of Hattusili, king of the country of Hatti, has to assure his sovereignty of the country of Hatti instead of Hattusili, his father, after the numerous years of Hattusili, king of the country of Hatti.
Look, Hattusili the great king, the king of the country of Hatti, and Reamasesa, the great king, the king of the country of Egypt, your brother, are at peace.
touregypt.net /peacetreaty.htm   (984 words)

  
  Hattusili III - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Hattusili III was a king of the Hittite empire (New kingdom) 1265 BC–1235 BC.
Hattusili and the Egyptian pharaoh Ramesses II signed the first written peace treaty in history, establishing a long-lasting peace between the two rival empires.
An archive of over 200 letters have been found from the royal palace at Hattusa which show that Hattusili exchanged with letters with numerous Near Eastern kings including Ramesses II of ancient Egypt.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Hattusili_III   (194 words)

  
 Mursili III - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Mursili III, better known as Urhi-Teshub was a king of the Hittite empire (New kingdom) for 7 Years between 1272 BC–1265 BC.
He was eventually ousted from power by his uncle, Hattusili III and later fled to Egypt, the land of his country's enemy, after the failure of his plots to remove his uncle from the throne.
Hattusili III responded to this event by demanding that Ramesses II extradite his nephew.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Mursili_III   (198 words)

  
 Queen Puduhepa & King Hattusili III   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Puduhepa's Ishtar, goddess of the city of Lavazantiya, was a goddess with warrior characteristics, which suited the serious temperament of the queen: she was not the Mesopotamian Ishtar, the goddess of love.
It is an invocation to the Sun Goddess of Arinna, the chief goddess of the Hittite pantheon.
The letters sent by Ramses to Puduhepa are identical to those he sent to Hattusilis: at least the Egyptian king accorded her an equal status to the Hittite king.
idcs0100.lib.iup.edu /WestCivI/new_page_81.htm   (1666 words)

  
 Ramses and the first Peace Treaty in History
After the death of the Hittite king, “Hattusili III” usurped the throne from the legitimate prince who fled to Egypt and was granted political asylum by “Ramses II”.
And Hattusili, the great king, the king of the country of Hatti, shall never attack the country of Egypt to take possession of a part (of that country).
Hattusili that he has not sent any gifts except one handicapped slave, despite Egypt did send numerous physicians who were highly demanded in Syria and worldwide, with a substantial amount of herbs.
www.arabworldbooks.com /ramses.htm   (2078 words)

  
 Ataman Hotel - Puduhepa and Hattusilis
Among the historical texts referring to his reign is the autobiographical Apology of Hattuşili III, in which he justifies his deposing of his nephew Urhi-Tesup, and which opens with the words of the great King Hattuşili and the Great Queen Puduhepa.
After Hattuşili III had deposed his nephew Urhi-Teşup and appointed himself king, the royal couple had prayers composed which open with an invocation to the Sun Goddess of Arinna, the chief goddess of the pantheon, and go on to thank her for her favour.
It is notable that protecting goddesses of both Hattuşili III and Puduhepa had the characteristics of a battle goddess.
www.atamanhotel.com /hattusilis.html   (3643 words)

  
 Peten Travels....ABOUT TURKEY
This was originally erected by his father Hattusili III (1275-1250 B. C.), in collaboration with Puduhepa, his ambitious mother.
The Egyptian version of the treaty between Hattusili III and Rameses II describes the royal seal appearing on the Hittite silver tablet as showing the queen in the embrace of the Sun Goddess of Arinna, the Hittite counterpart of the Hurrian Hepatu.
Bearing in mind that the king was represented three times and that his reliefs and statue occupied the most important position in both galleries and, further, that he was depicted to the exclusion of all other rulers, one is inclined to assert that these images were made during his lifetime.
www.petentour.com /birgul/hitit/loadpage.asp?id=yazilikaya.htm   (1081 words)

  
 CTH Main Directory   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Anecdotes (Palace Chronicle) of the Reign of Hattusili I
Letter from Ramses II to Hattusili II Letter from Ramses II to Hattusili III
Hattusili and Puduhepa to the Sun Goddess of Arinna
www.asor.org /HITTITE/CTHmaindir.html   (457 words)

  
 The Hittite Empire
Hugo Winckler was surprised to read there a copy or draft of the treaty between Ramses II and the king of Hatti, already known from its Egyptian version inscribed on the walls of the Ramesseum and of the great hypostyle hall of the temple of Amon at Karnak.
That the Kheta and the Hatti were the same was seen from the hieroglyphic and cuneiform versions of the treaty between Ramses II and Khetasar [Hattusilis of the cuneiform]: in the hieroglyphic text the latter is called `the great chief of Kheta' and in the cuneiform text `the great king of Hatti.' [300]
In revised chronology the `Great King of the Kheta,' against whom Ramses II moved his legions, was the king of the Chaldeans, and the signer of the peace treaty, Khetasar, or Hattusilis of the cuneiform version, was Nebuchadnezzar (Nabukudurri-usur).
www.specialtyinterests.net /hittites.html   (3704 words)

  
 History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Ramésidas (III to the XI one).It defeats of the towns of the sea.
Looks, the son of Hattusili, king of the country hitita, has to assure the royalty of the country hitita instead of Hattusili, his father, after the numerous years of Hattusili, king of the country hitita.
He/she looks, Hattusili the great king, the king of the country hitita, and Reamasesa, mai-fake, the great king, the king of the country of Egypt, your brother, they are in peace [...] (It lacks the list of the gods, witness of the oath, as well as the beginning of the curse formulas).
www.geocities.com /Athens/Academy/6401/ptah2ingles.html   (2894 words)

  
 homer
homêr-euô (A), to be or serve as a hostage, Aeschin.3.133, Antiph.117 ; para tini Aeschin.2.81 ; huper tinos Is.7.8, IG12(7).386.20 (Aegiale, iii B.C.) : metaph., [oinos] pistin anthrôpois kai philian -eueiis the pledge of.
The name Kanesh was obviously an Egyptian distortion of Hittite King appellation Hattusili I, 'the conqueror of Hattussa, the land of Hurrians'.
The conquests of Hattusili sparked the inspiration of Indo European bards, creating large epics for the founder of their empire.
www.geocities.com /protoillyrian/homer   (6433 words)

  
 Egyptian-Hittite Correspondence: Ramses II and Hattusili III
the marriage of Hattusili's daughter, whose Egyptian name was Maat-Hor-Neferu-Re, to Ramses II in the 34th year of his reign.
The giving birth to a daughter by her is mentioned, upon which the Hittite king responded, that the birth of a boy would have secured the rule over the Hittite empire.
There is also evidence in the correspondence of a second marriage of Ramses II with a daughter of Hattusili, so far only known from hieroglyphic sources.
www.reshafim.org.il /ad/egypt/egyptian-hittite_correspondence.htm   (707 words)

  
 History's Great Peacemakers - MSN Encarta
Instead of gathering an army, Ramses sat down with Hattusili III, the Hittite king, and the two men drew up a treaty.
And in truth, historically, the people best situated to make dramatic peace are those who have been making effective war.
Read a translation of the Hittite version of the peace treaty between Ramses II and Hattusili III.
encarta.msn.com /encnet/features/Columns/?Article=peacemakersmain   (520 words)

  
 Chronology of the Ancient Near East: Encyclopedia topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The correspondence of the Hittite kings Hattusili III (Hattusili III: hattusili iii was a king of the hittite empire (new kingdom) 1266 bc-1236...
The difference of eighteen years in Sayce's two dates for the rise of Dynasty was due to his employing in 1902 the figures assigned to the first seven kings of the dynasty upon the larger of the two contemporary date-lists, which had meanwhile been published, in place of those given by the List of Kings.
He continued to accept the figure of the Kings' List for Dynasty III, but he reduced the length of Dynasty II by fifty years, arguing that the figures assigned to some of the reigns were improbably high.
absoluteastronomy.com /reference/chronology_of_the_ancient_near_east   (6055 words)

  
 The Hittites - All About Turkey
Pudupepa, wife of Hattusilis III, is regularly associated with her husband in treaties an documents of the state and she even carried on correspondence with foreign kings and queens in her own right.
Both she and the last queen of Suppiluliumas I remained in office until their husbands' death; thus it is inferred that the Hilife.
This tablet is a peace treaty concluded after the Battle of Kadesh between the Hittite king Hattusili III and the Egyptian pharaoh Ramses II about 3260 years ago, demonstrating to modern statesmen that international treaties are a tradition going back to the earliest civilizations.
www.allaboutturkey.com /hitit.htm   (5534 words)

  
 New Page 1   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Thutmosis III son of Thuthmosis II by a lesser wife Isis 1490-1436 ANET 22-23, 234-245, 373-375, 446-447; Annals COS 2.2A, pp.
In year 10 Amenophis III married Gilukhepa, the daughter of Shuttarna, the king of Mitanni.
Ay 1335-1332 (1327-1323?); son of Yuya and Tuyu, the parents of Tiy, the wife of Amenophis III.
fontes.lstc.edu /~rklein/Documents/lb.htm   (934 words)

  
 Line of Hittite Kings
Labarna first known Hittite king 1680-1650 Hattusili I nephew/adopted son of Labarna 1650-1620 Mursili I grandson/adopted son of Hattusili I 1620-1590 Hantili assassin and brother-in-law of Mursili I 1590-1560 Zidanta I son-in-law of Hantili 1560-1550 Ammuna son of Hantili 1550-1530 Huzziya I son of Ammuna?
1450-1420 Arnuwanda I son-in-law of Tudhaliya II 1420-1400 Tudhaliya III son of Arnuwanda I 1400-1380 Tudhaliya son of Tudhaliya III 1380?
Arnuwanda III son of Tudhaliya IV 1220-1215 Suppiluliuma II son of Tudhaliya IV 1215-1200
history-world.org /line_of_hittite_kings.htm   (140 words)

  
 Egypt: Ramses the Great, The Pharaoh Who Made Peace with his Enemies And the First Peace Treaty in History
The Egyptian version was recorded on a silver plaque presented by Hattusili to Ramses, then copied on stone at the Karnak and Ramesseum temples.
This, together with the bitterness Hattusili felt due to the arrogant tone in Ramses’ messages, continued to create tension between the two courts.
Hattusili had send but one handicapped slave as a gift, while Ramses had sent a number of physicians who were in high demand worldwide, along with a substantial quantity of herbs.
www.touregypt.net /featurestories/treaty.htm   (1931 words)

  
 Chronology of the Near East (15,000 B.C. - A.D. 636)
1650 B.C. Hattusili, son or nephew of Labarna, founds the Hittite kingdom, moves the capital from Kussara to Hattusa (150 kms east of Ankara) and adopts the language of Nesa.
1237 B.C. Hittite king Hattusili III dies and is succeeded by his son Tudhaliya IV, who builds a palace on the acropolis of the capital, Hattusa.
823 B.C. Shalmeneser III's son, Shamshi-Adad V of Assyria, conquers Babylon and extends the empire from the Gulf to the Mediterranean.
www.thelatinlibrary.com /imperialism/notes/neareastchron.html   (3713 words)

  
 Al-Ahram Weekly | Heritage | Ancient peace   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Early studies of the wedge-shaped lines that make up the pictographic characters used in the writing, which developed in Mesopotamia during the fourth millennium, revealed that the text was written in Sumerian, most likely with the Hittite style of signs.
First with the Amarna Tablets, which comprise the diplomatic correspondence of the Amenhotep III, IV and Tutankhamun with contemporary rulers north of Egypt.
Second with the correspondence of the Royal Court of Ramses II with the Hittite Court of Hattusili III found at Hattusas- Boghaskoy in Turkey -- and which, Pusch explained, were written in Babylonian and concerned diplomatic marriages, matters of trade and general diplomatic affairs between both countries.
weekly.ahram.org.eg /2003/659/hr2.htm   (726 words)

  
 Kings.html   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Labarna first known Hittite king 1680-1650 Hattusili I nephew/adopted son of Labarna 1650-1620 Mursili I grandson/adopted son of Hattusili I 1620-1590 Hantili assassin and brother-in-law of Mursili I 1590-1560 Zidanta I son-in-law of Hantili 1560-1550 Ammuna son of Hantili 1550-1530 Huzziya I son of Ammuna?
1450-1420 Arnuwanda I son-in-law of Tudhaliya II 1420-1400 Tudhaliya III son of Arnuwanda I 1400-1380 Tudhaliya son of Tudhaliya III 1380?
Arnuwanda III son of Tudhaliya IV 1220-1215 Suppiluliuma II son of Tudhaliya IV 1215-1200
www.asor.org /HITTITE/Kings.html   (126 words)

  
 [No title]
II and III Forwarded on behalf of the undersigned, to whom responses and inquiries should be directed.
II and III by Marcel Sigrist II: Texts from the Yale Babylonian Collections part 1 --- From Shulgi to Amar-Sin Texts from the Nies Babylonian Collection and the Yale Babylonian Collection, containing introduction by W. Hallo, catalogue, concordance, transliterations of 664 texts from the reign of Shulgi and 537 texts from the reign of Amar-Sin.
Velikovsky showed that the great adversaries of D-19, Hattusili III the son of Mursili II, are Nebukadrezar (Greek)=(Nabu)-Khetasar (Egyptian)=(Nabu)-Hattusili (in Khattili), the son of Nabopolasar (Greek)=(Nabu)-Merosar (Egyptian)=(Nabu)-Mursili (in Khattili).
oi.uchicago.edu /OI/ANE/ANE-DIGEST/2000/v2000.n042   (3978 words)

  
 Translated Documents   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
In particular, letters sent to her personally from the Egyptian King Ramses II are word for the same as those he sent to her husband Hattusili III.
This tablet, together with A 139 and other correspondence found at Boğazköy between Ramses II and either Hattusili III or Queen Puduhepa, give information about the plans to send their daughter Hittite princess as a wife for Ramses II and a queen for Egypt.
Although Queen Puduhepa, the wife of the Hittite King Hattusili III, played a very important role in diplomatic correspondence between the Egyptian and Hittite states, only a single letter is known written by Queen Naptera, wife of Ramses II.
idcs0100.lib.iup.edu /WestCivI/translated_documents.htm   (1820 words)

  
 Peace Treaty between Ramses II and Hattusili III   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The peace treaty between Ramses II and Hattusili III
It is better than the former peace and brotherhood which were in the land.
The Treaty Between Hattusilis and Ramesses II, the Hittite and Egyptian versions.
nefertiti.iwebland.com /ramses-hattusili-treaty.htm   (2063 words)

  
 Hittite Monuments - Fraktin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The scene on the right shows Queen Puduhepa, depicted clothed from head to foot in her priestess’ robes, pouring a libation to the goddess Hepatu (Hepat) or Arinna.
Akurgal finds it unusual that Hattusili and Puduhepa are depicted with similar, conical head pieces as the god and goddess, which indicates the deification of the King and Queen during their life time.
To the right of the both relief there is also an unfinished inscription, and possibly read as "daughter of the country Kizzuwatna, loved of the divinities".
www.bilgin.com /hittite/fraktin   (251 words)

  
 SkyscraperCity Forums - Anatolia:The Cradle of Civilizations   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The frontiers of Urartu were threatened on several occasions, and to combat this, the Urartu built buffer towns on the edges of their territory that were abandoned in times of danger, and later inhabited.
In 197 BC Lycia was taken from the Ptolemies by Antiochus III, king of Syria.
Reformist sultans such as Selim III (1789-1807) and Mahmut II (1808-1839) succeeded in pushing Ottoman bureaucracy, society and culture ahead, but not in curing all the empire's ills.
www.skyscrapercity.com /showthread.php?t=178197   (14278 words)

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