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Topic: Hawker Hunter


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  HAWKER HUNTER - HISTORY
Hawkers worked on a number of designs for jet fighters after the war and the Hunter would follow on from the Sea Hawk via another design, the P.1052.
Hunter deployment accelerated, with the aircraft replacing the Sabres, Vampires and Venoms of Fighter Command and RAF Germany.
Participating in the 1965 and 1971 conflicts with Pakistan, the Hunter proved to be a formidable ground attack aircraft and took a heavy toll of Pakistani armour.
www.thunder-and-lightnings.co.uk /hunter/history.html   (2747 words)

  
 Hawker Hunter FGA9 airplane pictures & aircraft photos - RAF Museums
The Hunter was the first high-speed jet fighter with radar and fully-powered flying controls to go into widespread service with the Royal Air Force.
Hawkers won with a proposal for a modified Hunter F6 and an order was placed for the conversion of a number of airframes.
The last operational Hunter FGA9s were flown by No.8 Squadron which disbanded in December 1971 although the type continued to be used in training units for a little longer.
www.rafmuseum.org.uk /hawker-hunter-fga9.htm   (181 words)

  
 Hawker Hunter FR10
The Hunter was originally designed as a replacement for the Gloster Meteor, initial design work began in 1948 and the prototype, known then as the P1067, first flew on 20 Jul 51 in the hands of Hawker's Chief Test Pilot, Neville Duke.
A little known aspect of Hawker Hunter operations is the ingenious adaptation of a number of Hunter FGA9 aircraft by the Royal Rhodesian Air Force (RRAF) to undertake fighter reconnaissance missions during the countries bloody struggle with nationalist guerrillas in the early 1970’s.
The first RRAF Hunter arrived on 20 Dec 60 and by 15 May 63 the final aircraft was delivered to 1 Sqn at RRAF Thornhill, near Gwelo in the Central Highlands, bringing the squadron up to its full strength of 12 aircraft.
www.spyflight.co.uk /fr10.htm   (1252 words)

  
 Camouflage & markings - Hawker Hunter
The elegant Hawker Hunter, with it's shark-like fin and graceful lines was arguably one of the prettiest aircraft to come out of England.
It had a fairly brief life with the Hunter and was disbanded to leave 229 OCU as the main and only Hunter OCU.
Hawker Hunter used to be neglected by major kit manufacturers during decades.
www.ipmsstockholm.org /magazine/1998/10/stuff_eng_profile_hunter.htm   (862 words)

  
 Clyde North Aeronautical Preservation Group - CNAPG.
The aircraft was re-registered by Hawker Hunter Aviation as G-HHAE.
The aircraft was re-registered by Hawker Hunter Aviation as G-HHAD.
The aircraft was re-registered by Hawker Hunter Aviation as G-HHAC.
www.cnapg.org /hunter.htm   (4583 words)

  
 Warbird Alley: Hawker Hunter
The Hunter was the most successful of the British postwar fighters, and is remembered as a delightful, capable airplane in every respect.
Deliveries of the Hunter continued until 1966, and during its life, the airplane was continually modified and improved, resulting in over 25 variants, including export versions for over 22 foreign nations.
Hawker Hunter Aviation, Ltd. -- UK-based contract-aircraft corporation with a large fleet of Hunters and other aircraft.
www.warbirdalley.com /hunter.htm   (426 words)

  
 Hawker Hunter-Britain's Most famous jet fighter
The Hunter design, embarked upon as early as 1948 by a team led by Hawker's Sir Sydney Camm, introduced several new features in its cockpit arrangement, being the first-ever British layout to provide from the start of design for the fitting of an ejection seat.
The result was the Hunter F.6, and it had an all-flying tailplane, and wings with a dogtooth leading edge (retrofitted to earlier versions).
RAE Hunters based in Cyprus and Malta were engaged in limited operations during the Suez crisis of 1956, and Hunters later saw some action in Aden.
www.fiddlersgreen.net /AC/aircraft/Hawker-Hunter/hunter.php   (1542 words)

  
 HAWKER HUNTER   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Regarded by many as the most graceful jet design ever to leave the ground, the Hunter is hugely popular aircraft, both with its pilots and with those who merely watch and wish to be a pilot.
From the same stable as the legendary Hurricane, the Hunter is from the era when the F-86 and MiG-15 were hot ships and not only outlasted them, but also stayed around longer than many later aircraft.
One of Britain's most visibly successful exports, having been operated by no less than 19 countries, the Hunter spent almost 50 years in active front line service.
www.thunder-and-lightnings.co.uk /hunter/index.html   (160 words)

  
 Hawker Hunter Aviation Sponsort
Hawker Hunter Aviation would like to gratefully thank and acknowledge the support and sponsorship of the following organisations for the air display designated aircraft, without whom their appearance at Air Shows literally would not be possible.
Hawker Energy’s first sealed lead acid battery flew in 1978 and has become the battery of choice for airforces around the world.
Hawker Batteries are currently flying on aircraft such as the BAE Systems Hawk and Harrier, Lockheed Martin F-16, Dassault Rafale, Westland-Agusta EH101, Boeing B-1B and many more.
www.hunterteam.com /sponsors.htm   (337 words)

  
 3D 3ds Hawker Hunter F-6
The Hawker Hunter was one of the most advanced supersonic fighters of its day.
The Hawker hunter was also one of the sleekest best looking fighters of its time.
It was built by Hawker for the RAF and was sold to other countries in export deals.
www.turbosquid.com /FullPreview/Index.cfm/ID/259958/SID/190982/blFP/1   (215 words)

  
 Hawker Hunter Aircraft - Cape Town Flying - Fly the Hawker Hunter in South Africa
Hawker Hunter Aircraft - Cape Town Flying - Fly the Hawker Hunter in South Africa
The Hawker Hunter aircraft was originally designed as a superior air fighter which, due to it’s versatility, was easily adapted for air to ground attack and reconnaissance flights.
These two-seater Hunters can be used for training, aerobatics, low flying and general flying.
www.i2ko.com /Careers/Fun/Fly_Hawker.html   (202 words)

  
 Hawker Hurricane
Royal Air Force Fighter, the Hawker Hurricane had a top speed of 320mph, at 18,200 feet and 340mph at 17,500, ceiling of 34,200 and a range of 935 miles.
During the Battle of Britain a total of 1715 Hurricanes took part, (which was more than the rest of the aircraft of the Royal air force put together) and almost 75% of the Victories during the Battle of Britain went to hurricane pilots.
The Hawker Hurricane was used in all theatres during World war two, and in many roles.
www.aviationartprints.com /hurricane.htm   (399 words)

  
 Flyingzone - Kemble's Hawker Hunter Anniversary Air Day 2001
However, on Sunday, the day of the Air show, the weather proved to be excellent, allowing this unique spectacle to be fully realised by the record attendance of over 10,000 visitors.
The fifteen Hunter formation at the close of the show was truly awesome.
An event that took great effort by Delta Jets and their supporting organisers, and one that will be remembered by the appreciating public for a long time.
www.flyingzone.co.uk /airshowreviews/hunteranniversarykemble2001/hunteranniversarykemble.htm   (303 words)

  
 Indian Air Force [Hawker Hunter]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Hunter's heavy punch and high thrust made it a formidable adversary.
Hunter F.56As (The Thunderbolts) of the No.20 Squadron in 1982.
A Hunter F.56 at Ambala AFS in 1958.
www.bharat-rakshak.com /IAF/Images/Classic/Hunter.html   (324 words)

  
 Hawker Hunter in Swedish service   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
It wasn't until 1957-58 the Hunters could be used as interceptors, something which of course was kept quiet at that time.
The J 29 Tunnans were retrofitted with afterburners, which significantly increased their combat potential, and since the Hunter's climb performance was on the marginal side, it was suggested to fit them with afterburners too.
During the early 1970's, Hawker purchased four retired, and due to be scrapped, Hunters from a scrap dealer in Sweden, had them rebuilt to T.68 standard in England and delivered to Switzerland in 1976.
www.canit.se /~griffon/aviation/text/34hunter.htm   (694 words)

  
 Hawker Hunter in detail
The first prototype Hunter was aerodynamically cleaned up and reconfigured for a world speed record attempt in 1953 by installing a stronger engine with reheat, twin airbrakes and a pointed nose cone.
As an interceptor, the Hunter was soon outperformed and replaced by the English Electric Lightning, which was a fully supersonic plane whereas the Hunter had to go into a dive to become supersonic.
Hunters were still used in various secondary roles in ever diminishing numbers well into the 80´s by the RAF and the RN plus several smaller establishments.
ipmsstockholm.org /magazine/2000/10/stuff_eng_detail_hunter.htm   (1228 words)

  
 Hawker Hunter T.7A. (XL591)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Hunter F Mk 5 was essentially similar to the F Mk 4, the exception being that it was powered by the Armstrong Siddeley Sapphire Mk 101 engine, as fitted to the F Mk 2.
The longest serving version of the Hunter, (in RAF service at least) was the two seat Hunter T7 which was used for weapons and advanced training, one example still being used by the Empire Test Pilots School as late as 2002.
The Hunter's performance was sufficiently beyond that of exisiting training aircraft, such as the Balliol and Vampire, to warrant such an aircraft.
www.gatwick-aviation-museum.co.uk /hunter_t7/hunter_t7.html   (1252 words)

  
 Hawker, Hunter
The first prototype Hunter was aerodynamically cleaned up and reconfigured for a world speed record attempt in 1953 by installing a stronger engine with reheat, twin airbrakes and a pointed nose cone.
As an interceptor, the Hunter was soon outperformed and replaced by the English Electric Lightning, which was a fully supersonic plane whereas the Hunter had to go into a dive to become supersonic.
Hunters were still used in various secondary roles in ever diminishing numbers well into the 80´s by the RAF and the RN plus several smaller establishments.
users.bart.nl /users/wbergmns/info/hunter.htm   (696 words)

  
 Hawker Hunter Daytime Interceptor / Strike Fighter - Military and Civilian Aircraft
The Hawker Hunter was a single engine jet fighter fitted with the Rolls-Royce Avon series of powerplants that generated over 10,000lbs of thrust.
The Hawker Hunter was baptized in fire during the Suez conflict with Egypt, against Israeli ground targets with Jordan and with Indian air force pilots against Pakistan in the 1960's and 1970's.
By 1963, Hawker Hunters was already out gained by contemporary fighters and were relegated to the strike fighter and training roles for the RAF.
www.militaryfactory.com /aircraft/detail.asp?aircraft_id=225   (827 words)

  
 Revell Germany 1/72 Scale Hawker Hunter F.Mk.6
The Hawker Hunter is one of the most significant jet fighters ever built.
The Hunter served for almost a half-century, entering service with the Royal Air Force in 1954, while the last Indian Hunters were not retired until 2001.
As the Hunter was used by so many air forces, this kit will be welcomed by aftermarket decal manufacturers, although the export versions of the FGA.9 were the most widely used.
www.internetmodeler.com /2005/august/first-looks/revell_hunter.php   (1309 words)

  
 Hawker Hunter - Scramble
Viewed by many as the best transonic fighter, the Hunter served with the RAF for many years and was exported in great numbers.
In 1963 the Hunter F.6 was retired from RAF service as a fighter, while the ground attack versions stayed on until 1970.
As an interceptor, the Hunter was outperformed and replaced by the English Electric Lightning, which was a fully supersonic plane whereas the Hunter had to go into a dive to become supersonic.
www.scramble.nl /wiki/index.php?title=Hawker_Hunter&printable=yes   (457 words)

  
 Australia's Museum of Flight - Hawker Hunter.
Considered by many to have been the most aesthetically pleasing jet fighter ever built, the Hawker Hunter was the world's first multi-role jet combat aircraft and Britain's first trans-sonic jet fighter.
It was also the last aircraft designed by the famous H G Hawker Engineering Company founded in 1920 by the Australian-born aviation pioneer, Harry Hawker.
It was originally built for the Royal Air Force as an F4 model, which was the first Hunter variant to have a decent operational range (courtesy of the additional under wing fuel tanks).
www.museum-of-flight.org.au /amof-layout/hawkerhunter.shtml   (258 words)

  
 Hawker Hunter FR.74
Although the Hunter was being retired from frontline service in Britain by the start of the 1970s, new variants continued to be developed with the Mk.12 and T.8M, the latter arriving as late as 1979.
These losses were mainly among the Hunters configured for ground attack, laden down with bombs and operating at the limit of their range making them easy prey for the missile armed fighters.
As more surplus Hunters become available, it is becoming a sought after aircraft with the Warbird and Classic aircraft fraternity around the world and a popular performer (it certainly attracts attention because of its sheer volume) at air shows.
www.nzwarbirds.org.nz /hunterfr74.html   (2354 words)

  
 Revell-Monogram 1/32 Hawker Hunter FGA.9
By the time the Hunter F.6 became operational in 1957, most of the ‘bugs’ had been worked out and the Hunter became one of the main fighters for the RAF.
The Revell-Monogram Hawker Hunter FGA.9 is a re-packaged version of the Hunter FGA.9/F.58 kit released in Europe by Revell of Germany.
Cockpit photos of the Hunter show the interior to be almost a flat fl, so I painted all of the cockpit parts Testors Aircraft Interior Black.
www.internetmodeler.com /1998/december/aviation/av_hunter.htm   (1706 words)

  
 FRADU Hunter Gallery A, part 1
It was built as a RAF Hunter F.4 in 1955 and first flown in July the same year by Duncan Simpson.
Hawker Hunter GA.11 XE668 was delivered to the RAF as an F.4 variant in June 1955 and served with two different front-line fighter squadrons, No.
Hawker Hunter WW654 was built as a F.4 and delivered to the RAF on 28th March 1955.
www.fradu-hunters.co.uk /gallerya.html   (1545 words)

  
 Hawker Hunter F51 (E-419), of the North East Aircraft Museum, Britain
Apparently, Lebanon did not play an active role after one of their Hunters was shot down by a mirage near to the border.
The Hunter was newer than the Sabre, with a superior top speed, climbing rate, better built-in armament (two 30 mm Aden cannons versus six 12,7 mm machineguns), but the Sabres had better maneuverability at low altitude, and few of them carried IR missiles AIM-9B/D Sidewinders.
You may like to add to the detail about the Hunter that it was also used by the Somali Airforce in the 1980's.
www.neam.co.uk /hunter.html   (1479 words)

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