Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Hebrew calendar


Related Topics

  
  4. The Hebrew Calendar
The current definition of the Hebrew calendar is generally said to have been set down by the Sanhedrin president Hillel II in approximately AD 359.
The Hebrew calendar is used for religious purposes by Jews all over the world, and it is the official calendar of Israel.
The Hebrew calendar is a combined solar/lunar calendar, in that it strives to have its years coincide with the tropical year and its months coincide with the synodic months.
www.tondering.dk /claus/cal/node5.html   (855 words)

  
  Hebrew calendar
This is in contrast to the Gregorian calendar, which is based solely upon a solar cycle, or the Islamic calendar, which is purely lunar.
The epoch of the modern Hebrew calendar is Monday, October 7, 3761 BCE, being the tabular date (same daylight period) in the proleptic Julian calendar corresponding to 1 Tishri AM 1 (AM = Anno Mundi = in the year of the world).
The Hebrew month is tied to an estimate of the average time taken by the Moon to cycle from lunar conjunction to lunar conjunction.
publicliterature.org /en/wikipedia/h/he/hebrew_calendar_1.html   (1361 words)

  
  Hebrew calendar - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
As the Hebrew calendar was developed in the region east of the Mediterranean Sea, references to seasons reflect the times and climate of the Northern Hemisphere.
This figure, in a detail of a medieval Hebrew calendar, reminded Jews of the palm branch (Lulav), the myrtle twigs, the willow branches, and the citron (Etrog) to be held in the hand and to be brought to the synagogue during the holiday of sukkot, near the end of the autumn holiday season.
Their calendar used the same epacts in nineteen year cycles that were to become canonical in the Easter computus used by almost all medieval Christians, both those in the Latin West and the Hellenist East.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Hebrew_calendar   (3873 words)

  
 Hebrew calendar at AllExperts
As the Hebrew calendar was developed in the region east of the Mediterranean Sea, references to seasons reflect the times and climate of the Northern Hemisphere.
This figure, in a detail of a medieval Hebrew calendar, reminded Jews of the palm branch (Lulav), the myrtle twigs, the willow branches, and the citron (Etrog) to be held in the hand and to be brought to the synagogue during the holiday of sukkot, near the end of the autumn holiday season.
Their calendar used the same epacts in nineteen year cycles that were to become canonical in the Easter computus used by almost all medieval Christians, both those in the Latin West and the Hellenist East.
en.allexperts.com /e/h/he/hebrew_calendar.htm   (4036 words)

  
 About the Hebrew Calendar
The relationship of the Hebrew year to the Civil year is illustrated by this chart.
To further bring the calendar into alignment with the lunar cycle, a year may need to be shortened or lengthened by one day: Kislev may be shortened to 29 days, or Cheshvan may be lengthened to 30 days.
Since we know the Civil date corresponding to Day 0 in the Hebrew calendar (October 5, 3761 BCE -- two days before the Molad Tishrei for Year 1), it is a straightforward matter to add the weeks and days to this date to arrive at the corresponding date for any date in the Hebrew calendar.
www.shirhadash.org /calendar/abouthcal.html   (1183 words)

  
 Calendar Converter
The Gregorian calendar was proclaimed by Pope Gregory XIII and took effect in most Catholic states in 1582, in which October 4, 1582 of the Julian calendar was followed by October 15 in the new calendar, correcting for the accumulated discrepancy between the Julian calendar and the equinox as of that date.
Unlike the Haab calendar, in which the day numbers increment until the end of the period, at which time the next period name is used and the day count reset to 0, the names and numbers in the Tzolkin calendar advance in parallel.
The Bahá'í calendar is a solar calendar organised as a hierarchy of cycles, each of length 19, commemorating the 19 year period between the 1844 proclamation of the Báb in Shiraz and the revelation by Bahá'u'lláh in 1863.
www.fourmilab.ch /documents/calendar   (5200 words)

  
 About The Hebrew Calendar
The civil (or Julian) calendar is based on the cycle of the Earth around the sun.
The Hebrew calendar on the other hand is based on the cycle of the moon around the Earth.
Hebrew calendar software programs use relatively simple table lookup to determine the exact length of a given year and the date of Rosh HaShana.
www.bioinfo.rpi.edu /~zukerm/hebdate/about.html   (1011 words)

  
 Calendars and their History
Adoption of a calendar depends on the forcefulness with which it is introduced and on the willingness of society to accept it.
The history of calendars in India is a remarkably complex subject owing to the continuity of Indian civilization and to the diversity of cultural influences.
Since the calendar is based on the true positions of the Sun and Moon, the accuracy of the calendar depends on the accuracy of the astronomical theories and calculations.
astro.nmsu.edu /~lhuber/leaphist.html   (8496 words)

  
 Hebrew Calendar
One is that a calendar based on the sun and the moon was one of the earliest achievements of civilized man. The other is the heroic efforts these people made to create and preserve their calendar.
The years of Noah's calendar were reckoned from his birth: "In the six hundredth year of Noah's life, in the second month, the seventeenth day of the month, the same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened" (Genesis 7: 11).
The modern Hebrew calendar is sometimes challenged because the "new moon" may be postponed one or two days based on a complex set of rules.
www.cornerstone1.org /cemcaldr.htm   (5682 words)

  
 Hebrew Calendar Science and Myths
Since it is required that the Hebrew calendar be constructed in complete days, an initial approach at determining the Hebrew calendar based on the astronomical calendar would be to have the Hebrew years start on the weekday of the molad of Tishrei.
Over the full Hebrew calendar cycle of 689472 years, the Tishrei moladot that are for the 11th, 13th, and 15th years of the calendar's 19 year cycles are repeated exactly 3 times, while all of the other Tishrei moladot are repeated exactly 4 times.
The accuracy of the Hebrew calendar is fixed by the value of its mean lunation period coupled to the 19 year cycle of 235 lunar months.
www.geocities.com /Athens/1584   (7967 words)

  
 3. The Hebrew Calendar   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The current definition of the Hebrew calendar is generally said to have been set down by the Sanhedrin president Hillel II in approximately AD 359.
The Hebrew calendar is used for religious purposes by Jews all over the world, and it is the official calendar of Israel.
The Hebrew calendar is a combined solar/lunar calendar, in that it strives to have its years coincide with the tropical year and its months coincide with the synodic months.
www.pjbsware.demon.co.uk /calendar/faq/node4.html   (844 words)

  
 [No title]
The Hebrew calendar is a lunar-based calendar, meaning a day begins and ends at sundown.
Scientific dating the Elephantine papyri reveals that the Hebrew calendar used in the 5th century BC was under development.
Each year on the anniversary of the death (by the Hebrew calendar), Yahrzeit is observed by the relatives.
www.lycos.com /info/hebrew-calendar.html   (447 words)

  
 Jewish Calendar - Hebrew Calendar
The Samaritan calendar fixes the first day of the month by the conjunction of the moon with the sun, not by the new moon, and their months are numbered, not named.
The Hebrew calendar is lunisolar, meaning that it tries to use both a solar calendar in years and lunar calendar in months.
As just mentioned, the Hebrew calendar goes by a 19-year cycle that includes leap years in the 3rd, 6th, 8th, 11th, 14th, 17th and 19th years of the cycle, meaning in those years, an extra month is added to the Jewish calendar to keep it aligned with the solar calendar.
www.angelfire.com /pa2/passover/jewish-calendar-hebrew.html   (6605 words)

  
 Judaism 101: Jewish Calendar
Holidays are celebrated on the same day of the Jewish calendar every year, but the Jewish year is not the same length as a solar year on the Gregorian calendar used by most of the western world, so the date shifts on the Gregorian calendar.
The Jewish calendar is based on three astronomical phenomena: the rotation of the Earth about its axis (a day); the revolution of the moon about the Earth (a month); and the revolution of the Earth about the sun (a year).
This calendar, still in use, standardized the length of months and the addition of months over the course of a 19 year cycle, so that the lunar calendar realigns with the solar years.
www.jewfaq.org /calendar.htm   (1587 words)

  
 The Hebrew Calendar - Judaica Guide
The Hebrew calendar is quite different from the Gregorian calendar, which is commonly used in the modern world.
However, the Hebrew calendar is not at all unrelated to the Solar year: There is a lot of importance to the four seasons in the Jewish religion, and so once every 3 years an extra month is added to the Hebrew calendar in order for it to synchronize with the solar calendar.
But even then, the Hebrew year is 50 minutes shorter than the Solar year, and this causes a very slow shift "backwards": Since this method of counting was introduced, the time of the Solar year in which Passover is celebrated moved about one week back, in the direction of winter.
www.judaica-guide.com /the_hebrew_calendar   (731 words)

  
 Rectified Hebrew Calendar
Extrapolating the Traditional Hebrew Calendar back to the era of Hillel II (Hillel ben Judah) in Hebrew year 4119, the beginning of Nisan in the first year of each 19-year cycle was near the moment of the northward equinox (in terms of Jerusalem mean solar time).
This function is critical for determining the leap cycle of the calendar and hence its alignment relative to the solar cycle, specifically the northward equinox (spring equinox of the northern hemisphere).
Hebrew Calendar leap years are the 2nd or 3rd year after the previous leap year, at intervals that are as uniformly spread as possible.
individual.utoronto.ca /kalendis/hebrew/rect.htm   (14155 words)

  
 Jewish Calendar
The Jewish calendar is primarily lunar, with each month beginning on the new moon, when the first sliver of moon becomes visible after the dark of the moon.
The problem with strictly lunar calendars is that there are approximately 12.4 lunar months in every solar year, so a 12-month lunar calendar loses about 11 days every year and a 13-month lunar gains about 19 days every year.
On a 12 month calendar, the month of Nissan, which is supposed to occur in the Spring, occurs 11 days earlier each year, eventually occurring in the Winter, the Fall, the Summer, and then the Spring again.
www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org /jsource/Judaism/calendar.html   (841 words)

  
 Hebrew Calendar of the Old Testament
Keeping the lunar calendar coordinated with the seasons of the year required adding a 13th month to the lunar calendar seven out of every nineteen years.
Some have suggested that this represents both a civil and a religious calendar, with the civil calendar adopted from the Babylonians during the exile and the religious calendar ordered around the events of the exodus.
The differences between Christian Easter and Jewish Passover are due to the development of different calendars during the last 2,000 years (see The Easter Season: Resurrection of the Lord).
www.cresourcei.org /calendar.html   (616 words)

  
 History & info - the Jewish calendar
The current definition of the Jewish calendar is generally said to have been set down by the Sanhedrin president Hillel II in approximately C.E. The original details of his calendar are, however, uncertain.
The Jewish calendar is used for religious purposes by Jews all over the world, and it is the official calendar of Israel.
The Jewish calendar is a combined solar/lunar calendar, in that it strives to have its years coincide with the tropical year and its months coincide with the synodic months.
webexhibits.org /calendars/calendar-jewish.html   (957 words)

  
 History & info - the Chinese calendar
The beginnings of the Chinese calendar can be traced back to the 14th century B.C.E. Legend has it that the Emperor Huangdi invented the calendar in 2637 B.C.E. The Chinese calendar is based on exact astronomical observations of the longitude of the sun and the phases of the moon.
The Chinese calendar - like the Hebrew - is a combined solar/lunar calendar in that it strives to have its years coincide with the tropical year and its months coincide with the synodic months.
In the calendar that the Shang used, the seasons of the year and the phases of the Moon were all supposedly accounted for.
webexhibits.org /calendars/calendar-chinese.html   (2102 words)

  
 Hebrew Calendar
This modern calendar is based entirely on calculations; the Judean calendar used at the time of Christ was based on actual observations of the thin crescent of the new moon to determine the beginning of the month.
The modern Hebrew Calendar is a lunisolar ("luni"= moon, "solar"=sun) calendar, meaning that it starts its months at the new moon and uses years which are tied to the seasons of the sun.
There is a more detailed description of lunisolar calendars in general in the Introduction to Calendars section, which describes the mathematics of how this is accomplished.
www.johnpratt.com /items/calendar/hebrew   (234 words)

  
 HebrewCalendar Class (System.Globalization)
The Hebrew calendar recognizes two eras: B.C.E. (before the common era) and A.M. (Latin "Anno Mundi", which means "the year of the world").
The date January 1, 2001 A.D. in the Gregorian calendar is equivalent to the sixth day of Tevet in the year 5761 A.M. in the Hebrew calendar.
The Calendar property returns the default calendar for the culture, and the OptionalCalendars property returns an array containing all the calendars supported by the culture.
msdn2.microsoft.com /en-us/library/system.globalization.hebrewcalendar.aspx   (517 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.