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Topic: Hecatonchires


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  Hecatonchires
The Hecatonchires were born of Gaia and Uranus.
The blood drops gave birth to the giants and nymphs.
Article "Hecatonchires" created on 03 March 1997; last modified on 23 November 2003 (Revision 2).
www.pantheon.org /articles/h/hecatonchires.html   (123 words)

  
  Hecatonchires 
Hecatonchires come from the Greek Hecatoncheires which means "hundred handed".
Later, Zeus released both the Hecatonchires and the Cyclopes from the Underworld, where their father Uranus had imprisoned them.
Zeus assigned the Hecatonchires to guard the Titans in Tartarus.
www.monstrous.com /monsters/hecatonchires_.htm   (161 words)

  
 Latin 1 - Mythology - Creatures and Monsters - Hecatonchires   (Site not responding. Last check: )
When Zeus fought his father Cronus and the Titans, the Hecatonchires were very valuable as "soldiers." With their hundred hands and tremendous strength and dexterity, they were able to hurl three hundred stones at one time at the Titans.
The Hecatonchires were one hundred handed monsters, the three sons of Uranus and Gaea.
Zeus released both the Hecatonchires and the Cyclopes from the Underworld, where they had been imprisoned by their father Uranus.
www.dl.ket.org /latin1/mythology/2creatures/hecatonchires.htm   (174 words)

  
 Hecatonchires
The Hecatonchires ("the hundred-handed") were figures of Greek mythology, giants with a hundred arms and fifty heads.
Their father threw them into Tartarus, but they were rescued by Cronus and helped him overthrow Uranus by castrating him.
Homer also referred to Briareus as Aegaeon ("goatish"), and said he was a marine deity and son of Poseidon.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/he/Hecatonchires.html   (173 words)

  
 Hecatonchires : Information and resources about Hecatonchires : School Work Guru   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The hecatonchires or hecatoncheires ("the hundred-handed") were figures of Greek mythology, giants with a hundred arms and fifty heads.
Afterwards the Hecatonchires became the guards of the gates of Tartarus.
In the Iliad there is a story, found nowhere else in mythology, that at one point the gods were trying to overthrow Zeus but were stopped when Thetis brought a Hecatonchire to his aid.
www.schoolworkguru.org /encyclopedia/h/he/hecatonchires.html   (260 words)

  
 Hecatonchires.net - Information Overload
Hecatonchires posting boards will be a site for dissemination of ideas, thoughts, and information.
I encourage all topics, though I would appreciate it if you keep it within the realms of good taste.
There will be no personal attacks on Hecatonchires.
www.hecatonchires.net   (0 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Uranus (god)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Uranus hid the youngest children of Gaia, the one-hundred armed giants (Hecatonchires) and the one-eyed giants, the Cyclopes, in Tartarus so that they would not see the light, rejoicing in this evil doing.
This caused pain to Gaia (Tartarus was her bowels) so she created grey flint and shaped a great sickle and gathered together Cronus and his brothers to ask them to obey her.
From the blood of Uranus, Gaia later brought forth the Gigantes, who were destroyed by the gods with the help of Heracles.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/ur/Uranus_(god)   (253 words)

  
 Hecatonchires - Information from Reference.com
The Hecatonchires, or Hekatonkheires, were three gargantuan figures of an archaic stage of Greek mythology.
Hesiod reconciles the archaic Hecatonchires with the Olympian pantheon by making of Briareos the son-in-law of Poseidon, he "giving him Kymopoliea his daughter to wed." (Theogony 817).
Briareos Hecatonchires is one of the protagonists of Masamune Shirow's Appleseed.
www.reference.com /search?q=Hecatonchires   (662 words)

  
 Cronus
After dispatching Uranus, Cronus re-imprisoned the Hecatonchires, the Gigantes, and the Cyclopes and set the monster Campe to guard them.
Then Zeus released the brothers of Cronus, the Gigantes, the Hecatonchires, and the Cyclopes, who gave him thunder and the thunderbolt and lightning, which had previously been hidden by Gaia.
Cronus and the Titans were confined in Tartarus, a dank misty gloomy place at the deepest point in the Earth.
www.ufaqs.com /wiki/en/cr/Cronus.htm   (1033 words)

  
 Cronus - MSN Encarta
The first sons of his parents were the three Hecatonchires, the 100-handed, 50-headed monsters whom Uranus had imprisoned in a secret place.
Gaea sought to rescue them and appealed for help from her other offspring, including the Cyclops.
Zeus was aided by the Hecatonchires and the Cyclops, whom he freed from the prison where they were kept by Cronus.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761567582/Cronus.html   (245 words)

  
 ANCIENT EPIDAVROS GREECE
Uranus + Gaea - The personification of the sky; the god of the heavens and husband of Gaea, the goddess of the earth.
Their children are the Hecatonchires, the Cyclopes and the Titans.
Hecatonchires - Three sons of Uranus and Gaia.
groups.msn.com /ANCIENTEPIDAVROSGREECE/mythology1.msnw   (846 words)

  
 Hecatonchires
The Hecatonchires remained there, guarded by the dragon Campe, until Zeus rescued them, advised by Gaia that they would serve as good allies against Cronus.
During the War of the Titans, the Hecatonchires threw rocks as big as mountains, one hundred at a time, at the Titans, overwhelming them.
The Hecatonchires (under the alternate spelling Hecatoncheires) are listed in the Epic Level Handbook (a Dungeons and Dragons rulebook) as being the most powerful "monsters" available, with a Challenge Rating of 57.
www.danceage.com /biography/sdmc_Briareos   (746 words)

  
 Hecatonchires: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com
...Hecatonchires Hecatonchires The Hecatonchires (the hundred-handed) were figures....
...of Uranus and Gaia were the three Hecatonchires, who each had fifty heads and a hundred hands, and the three...the help of the Hecatonchires and the Cyclopes, since he freed them from their imprisonment in...
...Uranus, Cronus re-imprisoned the Hecatonchires, the Gigantes and the Cyclopes and set the monster Campe to...the Gigantes, the Hecatonchires and the Cyclopes, who gave him thunder and the thunderbolt and...
www.encyclopedian.com /he/Hecantocheire.html   (373 words)

  
 HECATONCHIRES Articles The Hecatonchires, or Hekatonkheire
The Hecatonchires, or Hekatonkheires, were three gargantuan figures of an archaic stage of Greek mythology.
In some versions of this myth, Uranus saw how ugly the Hecatonchires were at their birth and pushed them back into Gaia's womb, upsetting Gaia greatly, causing her great pain, and setting into motion the overthrow of Uranus by Cronus.
During the War of the Titans, the Hecatonchires threw rocks as big as mountains, one hundred at a time, at the Titans, overwhelming them.
www.amazines.com /Hecatonchires_related.html   (605 words)

  
 Cronus
After dispatching Uranus, Cronus re-imprisoned the Hecatonchires, the Gigantes, and the Cyclopes and set the monster Campe to guard them.
In a war called the Titanomachy, Zeus and his brothers and sisters with the Gigantes, Hecatonchires, and Cyclopes overthrew Cronus and the other Titans.
Cronus and the titans were confined in Tartarus, a dank misty gloomy place at the deepest point in the Earth.
www.teachersparadise.com /ency/en/wikipedia/c/cr/cronus.html   (765 words)

  
 Ancient Greek Mythology   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Uranus & Gaea was the personification of the sky; the god of the heavens and husband of Gaea, the goddess of the earth.
Their children are the Hecatonchires, the Cyclopes and the Titans.
Hecatonchires were gigantic and had fifty heads and one hundred arms each of great strength.
www.personal.psu.edu /crm5047/assignment_7/css_mythology.html   (2161 words)

  
 Cronus - Monstropedia - the largest encyclopedia about monsters   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Uranus drew the enmity of Cronus' mother, Gaia, when he hid the gigantic youngest children of Gaia, the hundred-armed Hecatonchires and one-eyed Cyclopes, in Tartarus, so that they would not see the light.
After dispatching Uranus, Cronus re-imprisoned the Hecatonchires, the Gigantes, and the Cyclopes and set the dragon Campe to guard them.
Ironically, Zeus also imprisoned the Hecatonchires and the Cyclopes there as well, just as his father and grandfather had; as a result, Gaia sired the monster Typhon to claim revenge, though Zeus was victorious.
www.monstropedia.org /index.php?title=Cronos   (1481 words)

  
 about Briareos
Briareos was one of the three Hecatonchires (the other two were Cottus and Gyges), which were born of Gaia and Uranus.
Briareos Hecatonchires, or Bri for short, is a character from Masamune Shirow's manga, "Appleseed".
Bri was transferred into an advanced cyborg body with the new "Hecatonchires" operating system, so called because the octopus-like wired brain operating system has an almost limitless number of I/O ports.
www.briareos.org /steve/briareos.html   (407 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Briareus
They are often considered sea-deities, and may be derived from pentekonters, longboats with fifty oarsmen.
Briareus was one of the Hecatonchires, the hundred-handed ones with fifty heads.
His mother, Gaia, was the most ancient Greek goddess and was known as mother earth.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Briareus   (360 words)

  
 Hecatonchires   (Site not responding. Last check: )
hecatonchires nebo hecatoncheires (“sto-podaný”) byly postavy Řeckého bájesloví, obři s sto paží a padesát hlav.
V Iliad tam je příběh, objevil nikde jiný v bájesloví, to na jednom místě gods byl zkoušející svrhnout Zeuse ale byl se zastavil když Thetis přinesl Hecatonchire k jeho pomoci.
V latině, Hecatonchires byl také známý jak Centimani.
wikipedia.infostar.cz /h/he/hecatonchires.html   (167 words)

  
 Uranus - Phantis
In the Olympian creation myth, Uranus came every single night to cover the earth and mate with Gaia, but he hated the children she bore him and imprisoned Gaia's youngest children in Tartarus.
Another variation of the story is that Uranus' mass smothered Gaia, and in desperation she created the scythe or sickle to have Cronus castrate his father.
The fate of being castrated and deposed by his son was prophesied and came to pass for Cronus who attempted unsuccessfully to avoid the fate by devouring his young.
wiki.phantis.com /index.php/Ouranos   (389 words)

  
 BRIAREOS Articles The Hecatonchires, or Hekatonkheire
The Hecatonchires remained there, guarded by the dragon Campe, until Zeus rescued them, hoping they would serve as good allies against Cronus.
During the War of the Titans, the Hecatonchires threw rocks as big as mountains, one hundred at a time, at the Titans.
Afterwards, the Hecatonchires became the guards of the gates of Tartarus.
www.amazines.com /Briareos_related.html   (594 words)

  
 Hecatonchires - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
ĜThe Hecatonchires ("the Hundred-Handed") or Hecatoncheires/Hekatoncheires were three gargantuan figures of Greek mythology.
They were known as Briareus the Vigorous, Cottus the Furious, and Gyges (or Gyes) the Big-Limbed.
During the War of the Titans, they threw rocks as big as mountains one-hundred at a time at the Titans.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/b/r/i/Briareus.html   (228 words)

  
 Cronus Information
Uranus drew the enmity of Cronus' mother, Gaia, when he hid the gigantic youngest children of Gaia, the hundred-armed Hecatonchires and one-eyed Cyclopes, in Tartarus, so that they would not see the light.
In a vast war called the Titanomachy, Zeus and his brothers and sisters, with the help of the Gigantes, Hecatonchires, and Cyclopes, overthrew Cronus and the other Titans.
Ironically, Zeus also imprisoned the Hecatonchires and the Cyclopes there as well, just as his father and grandfather had; as a result, Gaia sired the monster Typhon to claim revenge, though Zeus was victorious.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Cronus   (1456 words)

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