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Topic: Hellenistic Greece


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In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Hellenistic Greece
The shift from "Hellenic" to "Hellenistic" in the history of the Mediterranean world represents the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance of the city-state to that of larger monarchies.
The usual periodization practiced by modern historians is to see the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC as dividing the Hellenic period from the Hellenistic.
the Antigonid dynasty in Macedonia and the mainland of Greece
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/he/Hellenistic_Greece   (0 words)

  
 Untitled Document
The Origin of the Term "Hellenistic": "Hellenistic" is an adjective that was first used in the nineteenth century to describe the age and civilization which emerged from the conquests of Alexander the Great (d.
Greece itself went into a period of decline, both in population and economic importance, from which it was to recover only in the 19th century.
The decline of the city state and the rise of hellenistic monarchies had transformed the Greek world from particular civilization which looked upon the rest of the world as barbarians to a cosmopolitan civilization and culture which incorporated the rest of the world.
www.shsu.edu /~his_ncp/370mn08a.html   (0 words)

  
  Ancient Greece - MSN Encarta
The mountainous kingdom of Macedonia, north of the central Greek heartland, eventually became the leader of Greece and conqueror of the Persian empire.
The Hellenistic (“Greek-like”) Period gets its name from the greater knowledge of Greek language and culture brought to the Middle East through Alexander’s conquests and from the kingdoms established by his generals after his death.
Greek cities generally retained their traditional political organization, while Roman colonies in mainland Greece founded by Augustus and his predecessor, Julius Caesar, mimicked the political system of Rome.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_1741501460_3/Ancient_Greece.html   (1547 words)

  
  CULTURE OF GREECE : Encyclopedia Entry
Greece is often referred to as the cradle of Western culture and ancient Athens was considered its centre.
Greece (as well as Cyprus), also polled as, ostensibly, one of the most religious countries in Europe, according to Eurostat; however, while the church is guaranteed respect as a moral and cultural institution, a contrast in religious belief with Protestant northern Europe is more obvious than one with Catholic mediterranean Europe.
Greece is a Parliamentary Republic with a president assuming a more ceremonial role than in some other republics, and the Prime Minister chosen from the leader of the majority party in the parliament.
bibleocean.com /OmniDefinition/Culture_of_Greece   (6161 words)

  
  ipedia.com: History of Roman and Byzantine Greece Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Greece and the empire as a whole faced a new threat from the Normans of Sicily in the late 11th century.
Greece was relatively peaceful and prosperous in the 11th and 12th centuries, compared to Anatolia which was being overrun by the Seljuks.
Greece was mostly used as a battleground during the civil war between John V Palaeologus and John VI Cantacuzenus in the 1340s, and at the same time the Serbs and Ottomans began attacking Greece as well.
www.ipedia.com /history_of_roman_and_byzantine_greece.html   (1915 words)

  
 Greece   (Site not responding. Last check: )
During the Byzantine imperial period Greece experienced fluctuating fortunes, but succeeded in Hellenizing and institutionalizing most of its new invaders, and by the late eighth century Greeks from Sicily and Asia Minor were brought in as settlers.
Greece became the tenth member of the European Union on January 1, 1981 and ever since the nation has experienced a remarkable and sustained economic growth.
Greece's present prosperity is largely owed to the post-WWII "Greek economic miracle" (when GDP growth averaged 7% between 1950 and 1973), the implementation of a number of structural and fiscal reforms, combined with considerable European Union funding over the last twenty-five years and increasing private consumption.
www.tocatch.info /en/Greece.htm   (5368 words)

  
 Ancient Greece   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The period from 1600 to about 1100 is described in History of Mycenaean Greece known for the reign of King Agamemnon and the wars against Troy as narrated in the epics of Homer.
Greece was divided into many small self-governing communities, a pattern dictated by Greek geography, where every island, valley and plain is cut off from its neighbours by the sea or mountain ranges.
As Greece recovered economically, its population grew beyond the capacity of its limited arable land, and from about 750 the Greeks began 250 years of expansion, settling colonies in all directions.
www.gogoglo.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/a/an/ancient_greece.html   (3057 words)

  
 Greece History-Hellenistic Greece
The Hellenistic period of Greek history starts with the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and ends with the invasion of the Greek peninsula and islands by Rome in 146 BC.
During the Hellenistic period the importance of "Greece proper" (that is, the territory of modern Greece) within the Greek-speaking world declined sharply.
Philip's allies in Greece deserted him and in 197 he was decisively conquered at the Battle of Cynoscephalae by the Roman proconsul Titus Quinctius Flaminius.
www.justgreece.org /greece/history/hellenistic-greece.asp   (757 words)

  
 Lecture 9: From "Polis" to "Cosmopolis" -- Alexander and Hellenistic Greece, 323-30 B.C.
and the Hellenistic World, 323-30 B.C. There is little doubt that the Peloponnesian War ultimately signified the end of the city-state as a creative force which fulfilled the lives of the citizenry (on the Peloponnesian War, see Lecture 7).
Hellenistic philosophers questioned such an order and in general, turned to the inner harmony of the individual – a form of therapy with which to deal with an increasingly cold and impersonal world.
We should also not forget that although faith in the pantheon of gods and goddesses declined during the Hellenic or Classical age of Greece, its decline was felt most strongly amongst the citizenry and not the common people, who continued to maintain their traditional beliefs of gods and goddesses of the hearth.
www.historyguide.org /ancient/lecture9b.html   (0 words)

  
 Perfect Villas - About Greece: Hellenistic Greece
The Hellenistic period of Greek history begins with the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and ends with the annexation of the Greek peninsula and islands by Rome in 146 BC.
During the Hellenistic period the importance of "Greece proper" (that is, the territory of modern Greece) within the Greek-speaking world declined sharply.
Philip's allies in Greece deserted him and in 197 he was decisively defeated at the Battle of Cynoscephalae by the Roman proconsul Titus Quinctius Flaminius.
www.perfectvillas.net /about-greece-32.html   (0 words)

  
 Amorgos Greece, Amorgos Hotels, Amorgos Car Rentals, Travel Agents, Restaurants, Map Amorgos Island Greece
While planning your holiday in Amorgos Greece, you will be able to select the accommodation of your choice from a very wide variety of Amorgos hotels, apartments, studios and rooms for rent.
Amorgos Greece is a popular holiday destination for those who seek total relaxation and wish to connect with nature and its soothing aura.
In Amorgos Greece, you will find a marvelous yoga center where meditation sessions are offered and cater to the rejuvenation of the mind, body and soul of its guests.
www.united-hellas.com /tourism/amorgos   (0 words)

  
 Greece
Greece borders Bulgaria, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and Albania all in the north.
Greece is said to be the birthplace of democracy.
Ancient Greece was known as the cradle of the Western Civilization.
www.entergreece.com   (0 words)

  
 ArtLex on Hellenistic Art
Statuette of a veiled and masked dancer, 3rd-2nd century BCE, Hellenistic, bronze, height 8 1/16 inches (20.5 cm), Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.
Hellenistic Greece, Samothrace (island in the North Aegean Sea), c.
Hellenistic Greece, Melos (the Cyclades islands), Aphrodite, known as Venus of Milo, c.
www.artlex.com /ArtLex/h/hellenistic.html   (0 words)

  
 Hellenistic Greece - History for Kids!
After the Peloponnesian War was over, all the cities of Greece were worn out and poor.
But to the north of Greece, in a country called Macedon (MA-suh-donn), King Philip had noticed that the Greeks were very weak.
The combination of the knowledge of West Asia and India with that of the Greeks led to great achievements in science, in philosophy, and in art.
www.historyforkids.org /learn/greeks/history/hellenistic.htm   (572 words)

  
 Macedonian Heritage - Annotated Bibliography
The Hellenistic age–which, for some reason he seems to dislike–means for Green three centuries of dynastic oppression by thuggish war lords in charge of Empires, who never even bothered to learn the languages of their subjects.
The author, a modern-day traveller to northern Greece with an anthropologist’s eye–and ear–for the incongruous, was only moderately surprised when one rainy evening in a village above the town of Edessa she heard a speaker of a local Slavic idiom tell her this was ‘Macedonian, the language of Alexander the Great’;.
On the issue of Greece’s dispute with her northern neighbour, the former British Foreign Secretary appointed as mediator in Yugoslavia by the EU, says in this book (p.75) that ‘to the Greeks with the northern part of their country called Macedonia it was offensive to have an independent state called Macedonia on their borders’.
www.macedonian-heritage.gr /bibliography.html   (8162 words)

  
 American Historical Association   (Site not responding. Last check: )
These two aspects of the Hellenistic period, the emergence of Greek culture as a significant factor in the culture of the old world and the decline of Greece's Near Eastern rivals, were intertwined, since it was Macedonian imperial domination in the east that facilitated the cultural hegemony of Greece.
Hellenistic historiography was in every sense a continuation of the Classical tradition of historical writing inasmuch as the historians shared the same polis-centered viewpoint of their fifth-and fourth-century B.C. predecessors, treated similar subjects, used their predecessors' works as models, and even sometimes wrote continuations of them.
As in Greece, the Hellenistic period in the East was marked by significant cultural achievements, although it is true that subjects that did not receive royal largess tended to stagnate.
www.historians.org /pubs/Free/BURSTEIN.HTM   (13247 words)

  
 History of Ancient Greece - Crystalinks
The period from 1600 BC to about 1100 BC is described in History of Mycenaean Greece known for the reign of King Agamemnon and the wars against Troy as narrated in the epics of Homer.
Greece was divided into many small self-governing communities, a pattern dictated by Greek geography, where every island, valley and plain is cut off from its neighbors by the sea or mountain ranges.
As Greece recovered economically, its population grew beyond the capacity of its limited arable land, and from about 750 BC the Greeks began 250 years of expansion, settling colonies in all directions.
www.crystalinks.com /greekhistory.html   (3334 words)

  
 greece
Greece consists of a mountainous and craggy mainland jutting out into the sea at the southern end of the Balkans; though small, it has the 9th longest coastline in the world.
Greece has the 7th or 8th longest coastline in the world with more than 15,000 kilometres (9,300 mi) of coastline; its land boundary is 1,160 kilometres (721 mi).
Greece has a particularly rich culture and it has produced a vast number of contributions to philosophy, astronomy, science, and the arts.
hometown.aol.de /lorelaizak/wo-24109.html   (4936 words)

  
 NationMaster - Statistics on Greece. 2461 facts and figures, stats and information on Greek economy, crime, people, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In World War II, Greece was first invaded by Italy (1940) and subsequently occupied by Germany (1941-44); fighting endured in a protracted civil war between supporters of the king and Communist rebels.
Hellenistic culture built the foundation of Mediterranean culture and eventually blended with Roman influences to create modern Greco-Roman culture which connects the cultural traditions of Italy and Greece.
The final blow for Slav Macedonians in Greece came after liberation from the Axis, when almost 6,000 of them who had formed gendarmeries used as levies by the Axis occupation forces and engaged in limited ethnic cleansing and score settling operations against their Greek speaking fellow citizens were driven from Greece with their families.
www.nationmaster.com /country/gr-greece   (1442 words)

  
 Classical and Hellenistic Greece   (Site not responding. Last check: )
First, Classical Greece is considered the most direct foundation of Western civilization, more so than the civilizations of the ancient Near East that preceded it.
It has been convincingly argued that the margin over bare subsistence in Greece was so small that the surplus which was needed to give leisure to the minority could only be achieved with artificially cheap labour.
Greece, with its strong cultural traditions, was essentially unaffected by the empire.
edweb.tusd.k12.az.us /UHS/WebSite/courses/WC/Historiography/classical_and_hellenistic_greece.htm   (4337 words)

  
 Hellenistic Greece
The shift from "Hellenic" to "Hellenistic" in the history of the Mediterranean world represents the shift from a culture dominated by ethnic Greeks, however scattered geographically, to a culture dominated by Greek-speakers of whatever ethnicity, and from the political dominance of the city-state to that of larger monarchies.
Alexander and the Macedonians conquered the eastern Mediterranean, Mesopotamia, and the Iranian plateau, and invaded India; his successors held on to the territory west of the Tigris for some time and controlled the eastern Mediterranean until the Roman Republic took control in the 2nd and 1st centuries BC.
the Antigonid dynasty in Macedonia and the mainland of Greece
www.gamesinathens.com /olympics/h/he/hellenistic_greece.shtml   (218 words)

  
 Greek Art - Hellenistic Period
The local craftsman was not only an accomplished master of the artistic side of his trade, he also possessed extensive technical knowledge, which can be seen both in the fine silver inlays on the two large disks (stamps below) and also in the way the electrum was worked.
As such he was the chief representative of the art of song and playing the lyre, and of great importance in the religious history of Greece.
He is thought to have been a deserter from the Roman army, and was sold as a slave to a trainer of gladiators in Capua, southern Italy.
arthistory.heindorffhus.dk /frame-Style03-GreekHellenistic.htm   (1581 words)

  
 Ethics of the Hellenistic Era by Sanderson Beck
To gain favor in Greece, Polyperchon proclaimed for the kings that exiles (with a few exceptions) were to return to the cities, which were to have the autonomy they had under Philip and Alexander.
The Romans withdrew from Greece in 194 BC.
Unhappy with the settlement, the Aetolians allied with Nabis in Sparta and invited Seleucid Antiochus III to liberate Greece.
www.san.beck.org /EC23-Hellenistic.html   (20398 words)

  
 Religion in Hellenistic Athens
For many scholars the Hellenistic age saw the emise of traditional state religion and the rise of more personal cults, thus leaving the Greeks vulnerable to the missionary zeal of Christianity.
Jon D. Mikalson provides a chronological approach to religion in Hellenistic Athens, disproving the widely held belief that Hellenistic religion during this period represented a decline from the classical era.
Drawing from epigraphical, historical, literary, and archaeological sources, Mikalson traces the religious cults and beliefs of Athenians from the battle of Chaeroneia in 338 B.C. to the devastation of Athens by Sulla in 86 B.C., demonstrating that traditional religion played a central and vital role in Athenian private, social, and political life.
www.ucpress.edu /books/pages/7086.html   (350 words)

  
 Tinos Hotels Greece, Tinos Island Travel Agents, Car Rental, Information, Map of Tinos Greece
What is most surprising about Tinos Greece, is that it possesses all the characteristics that visitors are looking for in a Greek Island holiday spot, without the hustle and bustle of the major tourist resorts.
Thousands of people from Greece and abroad come to Tinos Island to pray to the Virgin Mary to cure them of ailments or to ask for aid in a difficult situation.
The climate of Tinos Greece is typically Mediterranean.
www.united-hellas.com /tourism/tinos   (0 words)

  
 ArtLex on Greek Art
Making generalizations about the visual culture of any group of people is a crude endeavor, especially with a culture as diverse as the Greeks'.
GreekArch is a resource for the study of art and archaeology of Greece and its provinces.
Greece in the 5th Century BCE and of
www.artlex.com /ArtLex/g/greek.html   (0 words)

  
 Hellenistic Art
The Hellenistic period begins in 323 with the death of Alexander the Great and ends with the battle of Actio in 31 BC.
Often the Hellenistic sculptor is not satisfied to only depict his subjects in true outward appearance, but he further strives to express their inner world, by the depiction of physical characteristics and postures that betray inner feelings, thoughts, and attitudes.
Hygea, the goddess of health, is created with all the subtleties of Classical aesthetic ideals, but her face manages to reveal an expression of concern and understanding towards a peson or a condition that seems to appear before her.
www.greeklandscapes.com /greece/athens_museum_hellenistic.html   (1013 words)

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