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Topic: Henry Muhlenberg


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In the News (Tue 23 Apr 19)

  
  Muhlenberg   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Muhlenberg was but one of a number of famous clergymen-naturalist of the period (i.e., Gilbert White, John Bachman) who's contributions to the science of natural history were not fully appreciated until long after their death.
Muhlenberg's daily entries are in combinations of colloquial German, Latin and English and are intermixed with faithfully recorded details of the weather, household and church business, the state of the garden, the contents of his mail, and the comings and goings of friends and colleagues.
Hitchcock, A. The grasses of the Muhlenberg herbarium.
www.tortoisereserve.org /Research/Muhlenberg_Body2.html   (2628 words)

  
 Henry Muhlenberg   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
He was born in the German (A person of German nationality) state of Hanover (The English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)), and studied at the universities of Göttingen (additional info and facts about Göttingen) and Halle (Saale) (additional info and facts about Halle (Saale)).
They sought formally trained clergy, and in 1742 Henry answered that call by immigrating to Philadelphia (The largest city in Pennsylvania; located in the southeastern part of the state on the Delaware river; site of Independence Hall where the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were signed; site of the University of Pennsylvania).
Henry married Anna Maria Weiser, the daughter of Conrad Weiser (additional info and facts about Conrad Weiser) in 1745.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/h/he/henry_muhlenberg.htm   (385 words)

  
 Peter Muhlenberg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg (October 1, 1746 - October 1, 1807) was a Clergyman, a Major General of the Continental Army, and a United States Senator and Congressman from Pennsylvania.
Muhlenberg was born to Anna and Henry Muhlenberg in Trappe, Pennsylvania and received a classical education from the Academy of Philadelphia.
Muhlenberg was made a Brigadier General of the Virginia Line, and commanded that Brigade in Nathanael Greene's division at Valley Forge.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Peter_Muhlenberg   (612 words)

  
 ELCM - Henry Melchior Muhlenberg Connection
Muhlenberg accurately assessed the precarious Lutheran situation in the Americas upon his arrival and took very active steps to Plant the Lutheran Church on solid ground.
The Rev. Henry Melchior Muhlenberg holds a very special place in the hearts and minds of Eastern Lutherans and Lutherans tracing their origins to one of the congregations established by his Mission efforts or the efforts of those trained by him.
The core of this procedure as refined by Muhlenberg gives the benefit of the doubt to the often silent and satisfied majority of a congregation and thus contributes considerably to the maintaining of harmony in congregations that is so necessary for ongoing mission work.
www.elcm.org /muhlenberg/muhlenberg.html   (1069 words)

  
 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg
MUHLENBERG, Henry Melchior, clergyman, born in Eimbeck, Hanover, Germany, 6 September, 1711; died in Trappe, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 7 October.
Muhlenberg was married, 23 April, 1745, to a daughter of J. Conrad Weiser, of Tulpehoken, the well-known Indian interpreter.
Muhlenberg was the father of eleven children.--His son, John Peter Gabriel, patriot, born in Trappe, Pennsylvania, 1 October, 1746 ; died near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1 October, 1807, was sent when he was sixteen years of age, with his two brothers, to be educated in Germany.
www.famousamericans.net /henrymelchiormuhlenberg   (2967 words)

  
 Biography of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg Richards
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg Richards was born at Easton, Northampton County, Pennsylvania, August 16, 1848, a son of Rev. John William and Andora (Garber) Richards.
In 1782 he married Maria Salome Muhlenberg, born in 1766, died in 1827, the youngest daughter of Henry Melchior and Anna Maria (Weiser) Muhlenberg, the latter a daughter of Colonel Conrad Weiser, of Berks County, a lieutenant-colonel in the French and Indian War, and later head of the Indian Bureau of the Province of Pennsylvania.
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg Richards came to Reading with his parents as a small child, and was educated in the public schools of Reading, graduating from its high school in 1864.
www.rootsweb.com /~paberks/books/pabios/richards.html   (1709 words)

  
 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg is the principal organizer of American Lutheranism.
Henry Melchior Mhuhlenberg died 7 October 1787, and is buried at Trappe, Pennsylvania.
MUHLENBERG, HENRY MELCHIOR (1711-1787), GermanAmerican Lutheran clergyman, was born in Einbeck, Hanover, on the 6th of September 1711.
www.holytrinitynewrochelle.org /yourti17151.html   (604 words)

  
 HENRY MELCHIOR MUHLENBERG - LoveToKnow Article on HENRY MELCHIOR MUHLENBERG   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
In 1742, in reply to a call from the Lutheran churches of Pennsylvania, he went to Philadelphia, and was joined from time to time, especially in 1745, by students from Halle.
Muhlenberg occupied himself more particularly with the congregation at New Providence~ (now Trappe), though he was practically overseer of all the Lutheran churches from New York to Maryland.
Muhlenberg married in 1745 Anna Maria Weiser, daughter of J. Conrad Weiser, a well-known Indian interpreter, and herself said to have had Indian blood in her veins; by her he had eleven children.
22.1911encyclopedia.org /M/MU/MUHLENBERG_HENRY_MELCHIOR.htm   (346 words)

  
 Muhlenberg College Men’s Tennis
The Muhlenberg College men’s tennis team has established itself as one of the top teams in the Centennial Conference, finishing with a.500 or better record in the league each of the last five seasons.
Henry, who served as an assistant with the Mules in 2001, is a 1991 graduate of North Carolina Central, where he was an all-conference player.
Muhlenberg has had two players reach the semifinals of the Centennial Conference Tournament in the last seven years, and in both 2000 and 2001 a doubles team made it to the CC final.
www.muhlenberg.edu /sports/mtenpage.htm   (563 words)

  
 The Life and Work of William Augustus Muhlenberg, by Anne Ayres
THE Muhlenbergs are associated with the earliest days of the republic as a highly respected and honorable family.
In the Heister branch of the Muhlenberg family there is preserved as an heirloom an ancient silver-mounted snuff-box which was given to him, as a token of friendship, by Frederick the Great.
Both families, from the period of their settlement in the country, having married within their own nationality, he was of purely German descent, unless we accept a tradition, cherished by himself, of a strain of the aboriginal American, through the union of a remote ancestor, Conrad Weiser, with an Indian maiden.
justus.anglican.org /resources/pc/usa/muhlenberg/ayres/01.html   (1320 words)

  
 IfHaS: Henry Mechior Muhlenberg: The Patriarch of the Lutheran Church in North America
In 1739 letters from Göttingen reached Halle in which Muhlenberg was requested to come back "home" in order to continue his work at the poor´s school.
Henry Melchior spend three years as diaconus and inspector of the Großhennersdorf orphanage in south-east Saxony.
Muhlenberg said good-bye to Großhennersdorf on December, 16th 1741 and travelled via Bautzen, Dresden, Oschatz, Leipzig and Altenburg to Köstritz.
www.ifhas.de /halhalhal/hallunken/hm_muhlenberg/texthmm_eng.htm   (1201 words)

  
 A Brief History of Muhlenberg College
Muhlenberg College is an independent, undergraduate, coeducational institution affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.
The name Muhlenberg College was adopted in honor of the "patriarch" of the Lutheran Church in America, Henry Melchior Muhlenberg.
General John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg wintered at Valley Forge with George Washington; Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg was the first speaker of the United States House of Representatives; and Henry Ernst Muhlenberg was one of the most eminent early American scientists and the first President of Franklin College, now Franklin and Marshall College.
www.muhlenberg.edu /muhlinfo/history.html   (292 words)

  
 F&M College: College Archives: College Presidents
G.H.E. or Henry Muhlenberg was born on November 17, 1753 in New Providence (Trappe) Pa, the son of noted Lutheran minister Henry Melchoir Muhlenberg.
In 1780 Muhlenberg became pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church in Lancaster and was instrumental in the ecumenical formation of a German College in Lancaster.
Henry Harbaugh Apple was born Nov. 8, 1869 in Mercersburg, PA, the son of Thomas Gilmore Apple (F&M President 1877-1889).
library.fandm.edu /archives/collegepresidents.html   (2776 words)

  
 November 25: Muhlenberg and American Lutherans
Muhlenberg was the virtual founder of the American Lutheran church.
Muhlenberg was greeted with skepticism when he arrived in America, but he had silenced his doubters by the time he died.
Henry died in l787, having realized his dream of planting churches in America.
chi.gospelcom.net /DAILYF/2003/11/daily-11-25-2003.shtml   (444 words)

  
 Historical Prints - Online Shop
Henry Melchoir Muhlenberg was born in Einbeck, Germany in 1711.
Muhlenberg believed that churches should be free from the government jurisdiction that had been practiced in other countries.
Two of Muhlenberg's sons served high positions in the young America-one as a general in the War of Independence and one in the new American government.
www.historicprints.com /shop/index.php?action=item&id=230&prevaction=pricelist   (224 words)

  
 [No title]
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg had immigrated to Pennsylvania from his birthplace in the German principality of Hanover in 1742.
In the 1770s Muhlenberg left Philadelphia to minister to the growing Lutheran population in the Perkiomen Valley, and to distance himself from the heated disagreements within Philadelphia’s Lutheran community.
Muhlenberg recorded his own observations on the shared trauma of the divided civilian community and the two armies.
www.explorepahistory.com /hmarker.php?markerId=565   (867 words)

  
 Pennsylvania People. Peter Muhlenberg. Level 2   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
Henry Muhlenberg had worked in an Orphan House in the town of Halle in Germany.
Henry Muhlenberg was far away from his son.
Henry Muhlenberg sent his son to a private English school where he learned bookkeeping.
www.cbsd.org /pennsylvaniapeople/level2_biographies/Level_2_biographies/peter_muhlenberg_level_2.htm   (4536 words)

  
 JOHN PETER GABRIEL MUHLENBERG - LoveToKnow Article on JOHN PETER GABRIEL MUHLENBERG   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-07)
(1746-1807), American preacher and soldier, son of H. Muhlenberg (q.v.), was born at Trappe, Pennsylvania, on the 1st of October 1746.
On the 29th of April 1796, as chairman of the committee of the whole, he cast the deciding vote for the laws necessary to carry out Jays treaty.
Gotthilfs son, HENRY AUGUSTUS MUHLENBERG (1782-1844), was pastor of a Lutheran Church in Reading, Pennsylvania, in 1802-1828, was a Democratic representative in Congress in 1829 1838, and was United States minister to Austria in 1838-1840.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /M/MU/MUHLENBERG_JOHN_PETER_GABRIEL.htm   (404 words)

  
 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg (from Muhlenberg family) --  Britannica Student Encyclopedia
More results on "Henry Melchior Muhlenberg (from Muhlenberg family)" when you join.
The German-born clergyman and scholar Henry Melchior Muhlenberg (1711–87) is recognized as the founder of Lutheranism in the United States.
Among them were Lyman, a Presbyterian minister, and his children Catharine Beecher, an educator; Harriet Beecher Stowe, a writer; Henry Ward Beecher, a Congregational preacher; and Edward Beecher, a clergyman and educator.
www.britannica.com /ebi/article-204998?ct=   (708 words)

  
 Today in History - October 7
A tireless traveler, Muhlenberg helped to found many Lutheran congregations and was the guiding force behind the first American Lutheran synod, the Ministerium of Pennsylvania, founded in 1748.
Muhlenberg is remembered as a church leader, a journalist, a liturgist, and--above all--a pastor to the congregation in his charge.
Henry Alford, compiler of the first comprehensive English commentary on Greek New Testament, was born in London.
chi.lcms.org /history/tih1007.htm   (840 words)

  
 Muhlenberg College — Allentown, Pennsylvania
Founded in 1848, Muhlenberg College sits on 81 picturesque acres in the west end of Allentown, 55 miles north of Philadelphia and 90 miles west of New York City.
The college adopted the name Muhlenberg College in 1867, 19 years after it was founded — in honor of Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, patriarch of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.
The Muhlenberg family remains one of the most prominent families in Pennsylvania and American history.
www.elca.org /colleges/institutions/muhlenberg.html   (263 words)

  
 August 26: Muhlenberg establishes Lutheran synod
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, founder of the first Lutheran synod in the New World.
Muhlenberg was in an undeniable position of leadership.
The constitution for the mother congregation in Philadelphia, St. Michael's, was written by Muhlenberg and adopted in 1762.
chi.gospelcom.net /DAILYF/2001/08/daily-08-26-2001.shtml   (540 words)

  
 The Times Herald - News - 06/28/2005 - Speaker helps save House
Muhlenberg served as a member of the Continental Congress and was the first signer of the Bill of Rights to the U.S. Constitution in 1789.
In the U.S. Congress, Muhlenberg cast the tie-breaking vote in 1796 as chairman of a House committee to ratify the Jay Treaty.
Muhlenberg was stabbed in Philadelphia by his brother-in-law over his vote, but survived and lived until 1801, Muhlenberg died in Lancaster while serving as Receiver General of the Pennsylvania Land Office.
www.zwire.com /site/news.cfm?newsid=14767870&BRD=1672&PAG=461&dept_id=33380&rfi=6   (1010 words)

  
 Slaving in the Garden
Henry Muhlenberg was born in 1753, the year the Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus published Species plantarum [plan-TAR-ee-um] and began our modern system of naming plants.
His father, Heinrich Melchior Muhlenberg, championed Lutheranism in North America, and being a vocal American patriot, he and his family were forced to hide in the Pennsylvania forests to avoid capture during the Revolutionary War.
Muhlenberg believed in sharing his knowledge and specimens with others, and thus the famed German taxonomist, Carl Ludwig Willdenow (1765-1812), working on a new, multi-volumed Species plantarum, published most of Muhlenberg's new species at that time.
www.lewis-clark.org /disabled.asp?H=True&NextPage=/content/content-article.asp?ArticleID=503   (1044 words)

  
 [No title]
Harr corresponded with Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, the patriarch of Lutheranism in America and the father of Peter Muhlenberg.
Although considered merely a missionary pastor by the church fathers in Germany who had dispatched him to America, Henry Muhlenberg functioned as a bishop, nurturing fledgling congregations, counseling and encouraging ministers and seeking to maintain rigorous pastoral standards.
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg noted in his journal that fund collectors from Strasburg and vicinity had visited him on July 3, 1765.
www.user.shentel.net /stpaul/html/Committees.html   (2164 words)

  
 The Pennsylvania and New York Ministeriums
In 1748 Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, with the help of others, founded what would become known as the Pennsylvania Ministerium.
Muhlenberg made extensive mission journeys in the colonies (and later states) of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Delaware, Maryland, South Carolina, and Georgia by horseback or wooden sail boat or canoe.
Muhlenberg also corresponded with Lutherans in all of these areas and with Lutherans living in areas beyond the reach of his missionary travels.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/lutheranism/102042   (386 words)

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