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Topic: Herbert Huncke


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In the News (Mon 24 Jul 17)

  
 Herbert Huncke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Herbert Huncke (January 9, 1915 – August 8, 1996) was a rare blend of sub-culture icon, writer, homosexual pioneer (he participated in Alfred Kinsey's studies), drug addict, common criminal, friend and enemy to America's most important social movements of the 20th century.
Huncke was a close friend of Joan Adams Vollmer Burroughs, William's common-law wife, sharing a fondness for amphetamines with her.
Although Huncke was not at the scene of the crime, he was picked-up in Manhattan because he lived with Ginsberg, and Huncke received the heavy prison sentence.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Herbert_Huncke   (1182 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Herbert Huncke   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Herbert Huncke was a rare blend of sub-culture icon, writer, homosexual pioneer- he participated in Alfred Kinsey 's studies, drug addict, common criminal, friend and enemy to America's most important social movements of the 20th century.
Huncke was born in Massachusetts but grew up in Chicago where, as a teenager, he became addicted to drugs and embarked on a life of hustling and crime.
Huncke in turn, turned the Beat Generation fathers on to heroin and life in the drug subculture.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Herbert-Huncke   (557 words)

  
 Herbert Huncke - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Herbert Huncke (January 9, 1915 – August 8, 1996) was a rare blend of sub-culture icon, writer, homosexual pioneer (he participated in Alfred Kinsey's studies), drug addict, common criminal, friend and enemy to America's most important social movements of the 20th century.
Huncke took an immediate dislike to Burroughs and thought he was "heat," slang for undercover police or FBI.
Huncke was a bisexual hustler, drug user, thief and burglar.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Herbert_Huncke   (1100 words)

  
 Metroactive Books | Herbert Huncke
Huncke, who led a life that had much in common with Jean Genet's, developed an original style that combined rather formal and colloquial elements reflecting both his middle-class Chicago background and his later days as a Bohemian.
Huncke hated 9-to-5 restraints and sacrificed much to escape them, including, ironically, his freedom, spending a great deal of time in one of the most restricted environments of all: prison.
Huncke, one of the fathers of the Beat movement, survived almost all his literary compatriots, living to a ripe old age in the process.
www.metroactive.com /papers/metro/12.04.97/books-9749.html   (640 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Herbert Huncke   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Herbert Huncke was a rare blend of sub-culture icon, writer, homosexual pioneer- he participated in Alfred Kinsey's studies, drug addict, common criminal, friend and enemy to America's most important social movements of the 20th century.
Although Huncke later came to regret his loss of family ties, in his autobiography, Guilty of Everything he states his lenghty jail sentences were a partial result of his lack of family support, Huncke left Chicago as a teenager after his parents divorced.
In the music world Huncke visited all the jazz clubs and associated with Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker and Dexter Gordon (whom he was once busted with on 42nd Street for breaking into a parked car.) When he first met Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac and William Burroughs they were interested in writing and also unpublished.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Herbert_Huncke   (1061 words)

  
 LitKicks: Herbert Huncke
Huncke was said to have introduced Kerouac to the term 'beat,' which Kerouac then used to describe his generation to John Clellon Holmes.
Huncke does seem to have a way with words, because he later attempted to become a writer, and a story called 'Elsie John,' reprinted in 'The Beat Reader,' is surprisingly good.
A superb collection of Huncke's best writings, 'The Herbert Huncke Reader,' was published by William Morrow in September 1997, and filmmaker Laki Vazakas's cinema verite documentary 'Huncke and Louis' records for history the paradoxical life of a celebrated literary drug addict in old age.
www.litkicks.com /People/HerbertHuncke.html   (614 words)

  
 [No title]
Though born a year apart, Huncke (1915-96) had been living an underground life as a junkie, thief, and homosexual long before William Burroughs became part of the New York beat scene, and, if you believe him, was a sort of mentor to Burroughs.
While Huncke directed a great deal of attention to obtaining narcotics and sex, which resulted in his incarceration off and on for years, and caused him to lead an extremely unstable life, he also devoted considerable attention to writing.
Huncke hated 9-5 restraints and sacrificed much to escape them, including, ironically, his freedom, spending a great deal of time in one of the most restrictive of environments -- prison.
www.austinchronicle.com /issues/vol17/issue11/books.pekar.html   (638 words)

  
 In Depth Essay about Huncke and Louis, A Video Documentary by Laki Vazakas
Shot in Hi-8 between 1993 and 1997, Huncke and Louis chronicles the turbulent friendship between Beat storyteller Herbert Huncke and photographer Louis Cartwright, who was murdered in New York's East Village in June of 1994.
Huncke reveals his resilience by continuing to write and to share his picaresque tales up until his death, at the age of 81, in August of 1996.
Although I had videotaped some of Huncke's readings in the late 80s and early 90s, my concerted effort to document his life with Louis Cartwright did not commence until the fall of 1993 when they were living on 7th street between C and D in New York's East Village.
www.metaclick.com /huncke/indepth.htm   (1477 words)

  
 Herbert Huncke
Herbert Huncke was born January 9th 1915 in Massachusetts.
Huncke first met William Burroughs in 1944, and subsequently introduced him to heroin.
Impressed by Hunckes lifestyle, Burroughs moved to the Lower East Side of New York to be closer to him.
www.tijean.freeserve.co.uk /herbert.htm   (417 words)

  
 Herbert Huncke: Just the facts...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Huncke difted to New York City (The largest city in New York State and in the United States; located in southeastern New York at the mouth of the Hudson river; a major financial and cultural center) around 1945, and resided in the Lower East Side (additional info and facts about Lower East Side).
At this point Huncke's regular haunts were 42nd street and Times Square (The area of Manhattan around the intersection of Broadway and Seventh Avenue; heart of the New York theater district; site of annual celebration of New Year's), where he associated with prostitute (A woman who engages in sexual intercourse for money) s and sailors.
It was around this time when he met then-unknown writer William S. Burroughs (United States writer noted for his works portraying the life of drug addicts (1914-1997)).
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/h/he/herbert_huncke.htm   (354 words)

  
 COSMIC BASEBALL ASSOCIATION-HERBERT HUNCKE 1997 PLAYER PLATE
In 1944 William Burroughs met Herbert Huncke when he sold the Times Square citizen a gun and some drugs.
Burroughs, who was fascinated by the underworld of crime and drugs, befriended Huncke and introduced him to Kerouac and Ginsberg.
When Huncke died in 1996, he was living alone, enrolled in a methadone treatment program in New York.
www.cosmicbaseball.com /huncke7.html   (296 words)

  
 Book review: The Hubert Huncke Reader   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
An ironic part of the book is when Huncke and a friend went to sea in order to kick their habits, and they couldn't because there was dope everywhere they went, even aboard the ship they were on.
Huncke may have been a junky, a bum and a thief, but you can tell by his writing that he was an educated one.
Although the book says Huncke wasn't able to do much writing in prison, I'm sure he did a lot of reading, because that's about all they allow you to do in prison, and he had 11 years in prison to do it.
www.spress.de /beatland/homes_of/the_beat/core/huncke/reader/review.htm   (1077 words)

  
 Huncke and Louis, A Video Documentary by Laki Vazakas (1998)
Huncke was a key figure in the formation and sustenance of the Beat Generation.
I had videotaped some of Huncke's readings in the late 1980s and early 1990s, but my concerted effort to document his life with Louis Cartwright commenced in the fall of 1993 when the two were living on 7th Street between Avenues C and D in New York.
While Herbert convalesced with friends in the Chelsea Hotel, Louis lost his ballast and began a descent in addiction and paranoia, fueled by his fear that his older friend would die and leave him alone.
metaclick.com /huncke   (465 words)

  
 The Herbert Huncke Reader
Huncke's work is a vital part of Beat literature, but until now has remained relatively unknown.
As WS Burroughs wrote, in The Herbert Huncke Reader, "Huncke had adventures and misadventures that were not available to middle-class, comparatively wealthy college people like...me....Huncke had extraordinary experiences that were quite genuine." The sad true is that Huncke was the type that Burroughs wrote about, but didn't like much.
I think there are obvious defects in the style of Huncke, he lacks focus and the ability to carry a narrative coherently to a signifigant conclusion.
www.literacyconnections.com /0_068815266X.html   (583 words)

  
 Herbert Huncke
Herbert Huncke was born on January 9, 1915 in Greenfield, Massachusetts.
It was Huncke that was said to have introduced Kerouac to the term "beat," which Kerouac would later use to describe his generation to John Clellon Holmes.
Huncke did make some attempts at writing, mainly short, honest character sketches about people he had met.
www.angelfire.com /mo/abalot/huncke.html   (329 words)

  
 The Beat Generation: Herbert Huncke: The Beats
Written in a flat first-person style that sounds as if it was first tape-recorded and then transcribed and edited, Huncke relates a series of grim (and often banal) tales of survival.
Although Huncke’s work is not the stuff of high literature (and it’s unfair to Selby to draw such a comparison), the content (if not the style) of his memoir fascinates in similar ways and produces similar feelings of woe.
Huncke introduced Burroughs to shady characters and experiences (“I gave Burroughs his first shot”), and he was later described in Burroughs’s first book, Junkie.
www.tygersofwrath.com /huncke.htm   (516 words)

  
 Beat Bios: Herbert Huncke
In 1946, when Herbert Huncke introduced the word "beat" to his friends, he couldn't have imagined that it would become a portentous, historical term.
Huncke worked as her shill for her midway act and delivered pot for her.
Huncke last saw her in the South State Street Jail.
archives.waiting-forthe-sun.net /Pages/ArtisticInfluences/Beats/BeatBios/huncke_bio.html   (405 words)

  
 butt love - herbert huncke   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The inspiration for the lifestyle adopted by the Beat writers, Huncke introduced William Burroughs to heroin, gave Kerouac the term 'beat', guided Allen Ginsberg and John Clellon Holmes through 40s New York......
Huncke himself began writing in the 1940s - locking himself in the men's room in the subway as the only place where he could work in peace - producing poetry, stories and memoirs.
Bio/Advert out the way, I like Huncke because he embodies everything great about the Beats, full of searing honesty and a love of life, he tells his stories with a perfection of tone and a beauty of language that grows from experience after experience that shape his writing as they shaped him - the Ur-Beat.
www.balfourbridle.demon.co.uk /buttlove/culture/huncke.html   (242 words)

  
 Beat generation
The term beat generation was introduced by Jack Kerouac in approximately 1948 to describe his social circle to the novelist John Clellon Holmes (who published the first novel of the beat generation, titled Go, in 1952, along with a manifesto of sorts in the New York Times Magazine: "This is the beat generation").
Calling this relatively small group of struggling writers, artists, hustlers and drug addicts a "generation" was to make the claim that they were representative and important—the beginnings of a new trend, analogous to the influential Lost Generation.
Perhaps equally important were the less obviously creative members of the scene: Lucien Carr (who introduced Kerouac, Ginsberg and Burroughs); Herbert Huncke, a drug addict and petty thief met by Burroughs in 1946; Hal Chase, an anthropologist from Denver who in 1947 introduced into the group Neal Cassady.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/b/be/beat_generation.html   (1037 words)

  
 Book Reviews - The Herbert Huncke Reader
Huncke never fought for the fame, the fortune, and the boys.
In Huncke's early years, growing up in Massachusetts and NYC, he used to entertain the boys at local cafeterias with his succinct yet street jargon-fulled stories; clearly he had a talent for story telling.
Although not as transcendent as his contempoaries (Burroughs, Ginsberg, Corso), Huncke's writing should not overlooked as "writings of a drug addict," or "a subordinate Beatnik." Huncke did have talent (most notably with recitations) and has definitely worked to the fullest by publishing what he could, despite his painful heroin addiction and ostracization.
www.book-reviews.ws /book-reviews/068815266X   (625 words)

  
 The Alsop Review
Huncke met Burroughs in 1944 in New York City, when Burroughs was trying to sell a sawed-off shotgun and some morphine Syrettes.
Huncke's friends remark about his considerable powers of empathy—powers which undoubtedly held him in good stead on the street.
Though Huncke borders on the obsessive in describing the physical characteristics of the person on whom he is focusing, there is much about that person we never learn—partly because Huncke never inquires about it; and, in any case, we will be on to a new person in a moment.
www.alsopreview.com /columns/foley/jfhuncke.html   (1178 words)

  
 U B U W E B :: Herbert Huncke
If Herbert Huncke hand not been around to enlighten and inspire the so-called "beat generation" of writers and poets who arrived on the American urban scene in the 1940s, somebody would have had to invent him -- and they did.
But Huncke was inspired too: he wrote several books of autobiographical prose relating to his "adventures and strange experiences" on the road and off.
Huncke considers himself a storyteller rather than a writer.
www.ubu.com /sound/huncke.html   (145 words)

  
 Huncke, Herbert --  Encyclopædia Britannica
More results on "Huncke, Herbert" when you join.
The metrical diversity, precise diction, and skillful imagery of his work made Herbert a prominent member of the metaphysical school of English poetry.
When United States voters elected Herbert Hoover 31st president in 1928, the country was enjoying an industrial and financial boom.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9113202?tocId=9113202   (634 words)

  
 Guilty of Everything (Herbert Huncke)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
It was once known as his "confessions." Raymond Foye of Hanuman Books published this first installment of Guilty in 1987 with the assistance of co-publisher Francesco Clemente in a small run, a now scarce edition.
In 1988 Huncke met young Paragon House editor Don Kennison in New York City who took on the manuscript and into it breathed new life, preparing and shaping it with Mr.
This event secured Herbert Huncke's place in the Beat bibliography and brought him steady fame in the last years of his life.
www.interference.com /webstore/us/product/093781508X.htm   (158 words)

  
 beatland AUTHOR : Herbert Huncke   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Herbert Huncke is the quintessential hipster, a Beat hero
Huncke was born in Massachusetts but grew up in Chicago
Huncke is credited with providing the word "beat" to these
www.spress.de /beatland/homes_of/the_beat/core/huncke/info.htm   (151 words)

  
 Herbert Huncke at the Blue Neon Alley   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Herbert Huncke's Introduction to Pipe Dreams:by Marty Matz
The Herbert Huncke Reader edited by Benjamin G. Schafer with a Foreword by William S. Burroughs : A Review by Jack Foley
The Autobiography of Herbert Huncke." Foreword by William S. Burroughs.
www.neonalley.com /huncke.html   (165 words)

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