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Topic: Hiero I of Syracuse


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In the News (Sun 18 Aug 19)

  
  Hiero - LoveToKnow 1911
Hiero was the brother of Gelo, and tyrant of Syracuse from 478 to 467/6 B.C. During his reign he greatly increased the power of Syracuse.
Hiero tyrant of Syracuse from 270 to 216 B.C., was the illegitimate son of a Syracusan noble, Hierocles, who claimed descent from Gelo.
A picture of the prosperity of Syracuse during his rule is given in the sixteenth idyll of Theocritus, his favourite poet.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Hiero   (455 words)

  
 Hiero II of Syracuse
Hiero II, tyrant of Syracuse from 270 to 215 BC, was the illegitimate son of a Syracusan noble, Hierocles[?], who claimed descent from Gelo.
Hiero at once joined the Punic leader Hanno, who had recently landed in Sicily; but being defeated by the consul Appius Claudius Caudex[?], he withdrew to Syracuse.
Pressed by the Roman forces, in 263 he was compelled to conclude a treaty with Rome, by which he was to rule over the south-east of Sicily and the eastern coast as far as Tauromenium[?] (Polybius i.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/hi/Hiero_II_of_Syracuse.html   (295 words)

  
 Syracuse Empire
Hiero's defeat of the Mamertines upset the delicate balance of power among the Greeks, Romans, and Carthaginians, all of whom sought the control of Sicily.
Hiero reconsidered his position and decided that it would be wiser to be an ally of Rome than of Carthage.
Hiero died in 215 BC at about the age of ninety and was succeeded by Gelo's fifteen-year-old son Hieronymos.
www.fenrir.dk /forum/index.php?topic=89.0   (756 words)

  
 Royal Family of Syracuse (Hiero II)
Hiero had observed that the dispatch of a Syracusan army on an expedition under the command of the supreme magistrates invariably resulted in quarrels among the leaders and the outbreaks of revolutionary activity of some kind.
This Hiero made an alliance with Pyrrhus the son of Aeacides, sealing it by the marriage of Gelo his son and Nereis the daughter of Pyrrhus.
Hiero is in the first place a more interesting subject [than his grandson Hieronymos] because he established himself as the ruler of Syracuse and her allies entirely through his own abilities, for he owed neither wealth, nor reputation nor anything else to Fortune.
www.mcs.drexel.edu /~crorres/Archimedes/Family/Hiero.html   (1968 words)

  
 Hiero I of Syracuse
Hiero I was the brother of Gelo, and tyrant of Syracuse from 478 to 467 BC.
During his reign he greatly increased the power of Syracuse.
He removed the inhabitants of Naxos and Catana[?] to Leontini, peopled Catana (which he renamed Aetna) with Dorians, concluded an alliance with Acragas (Agrigentum).
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/hi/Hiero_I_of_Syracuse.html   (133 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Syracuse
Syracuse became the seat of the Roman government in Sicily, and remained such until the Byzantine epoch.
Cyprian (the middle of the third century), Christianity certainly flourished at Syracuse, and the catacombs clearly show that this was the case in the second century.
In 1816 the Diocese of Caltagirone was detached from Syracuse.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/14395b.htm   (2092 words)

  
 Hiero I of Syracuse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Hieron I was the brother of Gelon and tyrant of Syracuse from 478 to 467 BC.
He removed the inhabitants of Naxos and Catana to Leontini, peopled Catana (which he renamed Aetna) with Dorians, concluded an alliance with Acragas (Agrigentum) and espoused the cause of the Locrians against Anaxilas, tyrant of Rhegium.
Though despotic in his rule Hiero was a liberal patron of literature and culture, and is known from the works of Pindar to have won a chariot race at the Theban Iolaia, and he was also praised (along with his horse, Pherenicos) by Bacchylides in that poet's 5th ode.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Hiero_I_of_Syracuse   (290 words)

  
 Hiero II of Syracuse - Japan
Hieron II, king of Syracuse from 270 to 215 BC, was the illegitimate son of a Syracusan noble, Hierocles, who claimed descent from Gelon.
According to a story told by Vitruvius (De architectura IX.9–12), Hiero was given a golden crown by a goldsmith and asked Archimdedes to find out if it really was pure gold.
A picture of the prosperity of Syracuse during his rule is given in the sixteenth idyll of Theocritus, his favourite poet.
hiero-ii-of-syracuse.zdnet.co.za /zdnet/Hiero_II_of_Syracuse   (734 words)

  
 Archimedes of Syracuse: Introduction
The King of Syracuse, Hiero II, managed to keep war at bay by honoring this treaty with Rome, but the situation became precarious in the later years of the century as the Carthaginian general Hannibal was gaining the upper hand in Spain and Italy against poorly managed Roman armies.
Hiero died in 215 and was succeeded by his young grandson Hieronymus, who switched allegiance to Carthage just as the Second Punic War began.
The accounts of the subsequent siege of Syracuse by the Roman general Marcellus in 213 in the military histories of Plutarch and Livy tell a fascinating story of the success enjoyed by Archimedes in the defense of the city, which managed to hold off the attacking Romans for many months.
cerebro.xu.edu /math/math147/02f/archimedes/archintro.html   (1546 words)

  
 Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2006.08.40   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Hiero's fortification of Syracuse and lavish spending on his flagship Syrakosia, L. notes, were not addressed to tangible needs: they must therefore have met the king's symbolic needs, his desire to be numbered with the great rulers of his time.
Hiero's theater featured inscriptions along the diazoma for each kerkis, starting with Olympian Zeus in the central one and setting the members of the ruling family to one side (Gelo, Nereis, Philistis, and Hiero) in relation to Syracuse's deities on the other (their identities effaced or illegible).
Similarly, having called Hiero "a businessman and a technocrat" (120), Finley added that "fundamentally, he has to be ranked with the contemporaneous Hellenistic monarchs in the Greek East, though a minor one, not with the Greek rulers of an earlier age" (121).
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /bmcr/2006/2006-08-40.html   (3241 words)

  
 Altar of Hiero II, Syracuse
Syracuse - Altar of Hiero II Region: Italy > Sicilia > Sicily > Syracuse
The Altar of Hiero II in Syracuse is a massive construction.
It was endowed by Hiero II, who was king from 269 to 215 B.C., in memory of the fall in 466 B.C. of the tyrant Thrasybulos, which was celebrated every year in Syracuse with the Feast of Zeus Eleutherios (the Zeus of Freedom).
www.planetware.com /syracuse/altar-of-hiero-ii-i-si-syah.htm   (196 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Hiero
He lived most of his life in his native Syracuse, where he was on intimate terms with the royal family.
A contemporary of Pindar, he was patronized by Hiero I. His poetry is noted for its narrative powers, clarity, and lucidity.
In 476 BC he went to Sicily to live at the court of Hiero I, and he died at Gela.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Hiero&StartAt=1   (583 words)

  
 Royal Family of Syracuse (Introduction)
He was one of fifteen guardians named in Hiero's will to counsel Hiero's fifteen-year-old grandson and successor, Hieronymos.
Hiero married Philistis so that Leptines would protect his interests in Syracuse when he was called away from the city on military matters.
He was assassinated along with Adranodoros by the pro-Roman faction in Syracuse, who wished to prevent Adranodoros, the leader of the pro-Carthaginian faction, from seizing control of Syracuse.
www.mcs.drexel.edu /~crorres/Archimedes/Family/FamilyIntro.html   (457 words)

  
 Hiero I: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library
I refer to Xenophanes, who is often regarded...practically certain that he was at the court of Hiero of Syracuse, who reigned from 478 to...dates only from this time.
The word hieroglyphic comes from the Greek language: "hiero" meaning "sacred," and "gluphikos" meaning "carving." When found...in the Valley of the Kings are those of the pharaohs Thutmose I, Amenhotep III, Ramses X, and the boy king, Tutankhamen.
After the wars he went (with his nephew Bacchylides) to the court of Hiero I of Syracuse, where he was a rival of Pindar.
www.questia.com /library/encyclopedia/hiero_i.jsp   (1188 words)

  
 Archimedes Palimpsest
Archimedes was born in the city of Syracuse on the island of Sicily in 287 BC.
Some maintain that he belonged to the nobility of Syracuse, and that his family was in some way related to that of Hiero II, King of Syracuse.
When the crown arrived, King Hiero was suspicious that the goldsmith only used some of the gold, kept the rest for himself and added silver to make the crown the correct weight.
www.archimedespalimpsest.org /archimedes_bio1.html   (1069 words)

  
 Whither high-energy lasers? Air & Space Power Journal - Find Articles   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Marcus Claudius Marcellus, the Roman commander, began attacking Syracuse during the second Punic War with a fleet of over 50 quinqueremes, vessels that were propelled by five banks of oars and filled with soldiers armed with all kinds of devices to overcome the city walls.
Hiero, king of Syracuse, asked Archimedes to design a defense for the city.
One experiment fitted an aiming device to bronze shields, traditional equipment for the soldiers of Syracuse, and was able to successfully focus the reflected sun's energy and set wood on fire at several hundred meters.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m0NXL/is_1_18/ai_n6120606   (871 words)

  
 Archimedes' Times   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
He attacked the coastal walls of Syracuse with sixty quinqueremes (battleships with five-man oar banks) while his co-commander attacked the inland walls with ground troops.
Archimedes played an important role in the defense of Syracuse against the siege laid by the Romans in 213 BC by constructing war machines so effective that they long delayed the capture of the city.
He was killed when Syracuse was eventually captured by the Marcellus in the autumn of 212 or spring of 211 BC.
physics.weber.edu /carroll/Archimedes/times.htm   (295 words)

  
 Syracuse Map
Altar of Hiero II - The Altar of Hiero II in Syracuse is a massive construction.
Cathedral - In the seventh century the Cathedral in Syracuse was built onto and incorporated the remains of the ancient and famed...
Porta Marina - At the north end of the Foro in Syracuse are the Porta Marina, with Hispano-Mauresque ornaments (15th century),...
www.planetware.com /map/syracuse-map-i-syrac.htm   (430 words)

  
 Theocritus Info - Bored Net - Boredom   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
I, Theocritus, who wrote these songs, am of Syracuse, a man of the people, the son of Praxagoras and famed Philina.
the poet praises Hiero II of Syracuse, in xvii Ptolemy Philadelphus, and in xxii.
The encomium upon Hiero II would seem prior to that upon Ptolemy, since in it Theocritus is a hungry poet seeking for a patron, while in the other he is well satisfied with the world.
www.borednet.com /e/n/encyclopedia/t/th/theocritus.html   (1606 words)

  
 Siege of Syracuse
But early in the war Rome forced a treaty of alliance from Syracuse's king, Hiero II, that called for Syracuse to pay tribute and provide grain to the Romans.
He attacked the coastal walls of Syracuse with sixty quinqueremes (battleships with five-man oar banks) while his co-commander, Appius Claudius Pulcher, attacked the inland walls with ground troops.
Marcellus took advantage of the Syracusans' neglect of their defenses during a festival to the goddess Artemis to breach the inland walls and take the city.
www.mcs.drexel.edu /~crorres/Archimedes/Siege/Summary.html   (541 words)

  
 Hiero II of Syracuse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Hieron II, tyrant of Syracuse from 270 to 215 BC, was the illegitimate son of a Syracusan noble, Hierocles, who claimed descent from Gelon.
He was a former general of Pyrrhus of Epirus and an important figure of the First Punic War.
Hieron at once joined the Punic leader Hanno, who had recently landed in Sicily; but being defeated by the consul Appius Claudius Caudex, he withdrew to Syracuse.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Hiero_II_of_Syracuse   (390 words)

  
 Archimedes
Greek mathematician and inventor, born at Syracuse, in Sicily.
He is said to have fixed on a large and fully laden ship and to have used a mechanical device by which Hiero was enabled to move it by himself; but accounts differ as to the particular mechanical powers employed.
Archimedes died at the capture of Syracuse by Marcellus, 212 BC.
www.nndb.com /people/746/000087485   (1046 words)

  
 Royal Family of Syracuse (Hieronymos)
In Sicily the situation had been fundamentally changed by the death of Hiero and the transference of power to his grandson Hieronymus, who was hardly yet of an age to bear with any sort of decency even the ordinary responsibilities of an adult, let alone the burden of absolute monarchy.
His intention was, however, violently opposed by his daughters [Damarata and Heraclia], who looked forward to a time when the boy would be nominally king but the actual power would be wholly in their own hands and in the hands of their husbands, Adranodorus and Zoippus, who were being left the guardians.
It had not been easy for a man in his ninetieth year, surrounded, as Hiero was, day and night by feminine blandishments, to free his mind from its concern with the personal and turn it to public affairs.
www.math.nyu.edu /~crorres/Archimedes/Family/Hieronymos.html   (1315 words)

  
 Siege of Syracuse
But early in the war Rome forced a treaty of alliance from Syracuse's king, Hiero II, that called for Syracuse to pay tribute and provide grain to the Romans.
His assassination led to civil war in Syracuse between the pro-Carthaginian and pro-Roman factions, during which most of Hiero's family was killed.
He attacked the coastal walls of Syracuse with sixty quinqueremes (battleships with five-man oar banks) while his co-commander, Appius Claudius Pulcher, attacked the inland walls with ground troops.
www.math.nyu.edu /~crorres/Archimedes/Siege/Summary.html   (541 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Battle of Cumae
The Battle of Cumae was a naval battle in 474 BC between the combined navies of Syracuse and Cumae and the Etruscans.
Hiero I of Syracuse allied with Aristodemus, the tyrant of Cumae, to defend against Etruscan expansion into southern Italy.
The Etruscans would later join the failed Athenian expedition against Syracuse in 415 BC, which contributed even further to their decline.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Battle_of_Cumae   (195 words)

  
 One famouse inventor   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
In one story, he was asked by Hiero II to decide if a crown was pure gold or was alloyed with silver.
Archimedes was extremely confused until one day observing the over flow of water in his bath tub, he suddenly realized that since gold has more amount than silver a given weight of gold represents a smaller thickness than one equal weight of silver.
Archimedes once boasted to Hiero king of Syracuse ‘’ Give me a place to stand on and I will move the entire earth.’’ When he said this he meant that pulleys and levers can move very heavy things with a lot of facility.
www.amersol.edu.pe /class14/_14cmulde/4th/Onefamouseinventor.asp   (293 words)

  
 The Republic
Hiero accordingly offered the Romans the possession of Messana, a substantial part of his other Sicilan territories and a subsidy of one hundred talents annually for fifteen years if they would guarantee his 'kingship' of Syracuse.
Hiero's territory was enlarged, and his independence as an ally of Rome guaranteed.
Hiero of Syracuse died in 216 BC, a very old man. Herio's grandson Hieronymus acceded to the throne and sided with Carthaginians.
www.roman-empire.net /republic/republic.html   (20225 words)

  
 Dionysius I van Syracuse - Wikipedia
In de tijd vóór zijn machtsgreep leed Syracuse een reeks tegenslagen in de strijd tegen erfvijand, Carthago.
Dit plan werd aanvankelijk verijdeld door de Carthaagse veldheer Himilco, die pas tegen betaling van een grote schatting bereid was een beleg van Syracuse op te geven (397).
Maar door het onderhoud van zijn luisterrijke hof en van zijn grote huurleger bracht hij Syracuse meermalen op de rand van het bankroet, en moesten enorme belastingen opgebracht worden, hetgeen uiteindelijk in brede kring ontevredenheid wekte.
nl.wikipedia.org /wiki/Dionysius_I_van_Syracuse   (451 words)

  
 264 BCE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The Carthaginians have an army of 10,000 mercenaries at Lilybaeum under the command of Hanno; their allies the Syracusans, have 15,000 men under arms, led by Hiero, the Tyrant of Syracuse.
Arriving at the gates of Messana, Hiero stops, rolls for Continuation, and succeeds with a roll '6.' He initiates a siege of Messana, which is an automatic Finish.
He knows that Hiero is going to defect to the Romans, so his rear is secure.
pathirtle.i8.com /264.htm   (1519 words)

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