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Topic: Hispanic (U.S. Census)


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In the News (Thu 21 Mar 19)

  
 Hispanic Heritage Month
The term Hispanic, as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, refers to Spanish-speaking people in the United States of any race.
Population of the United States by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2000 Census
On the 2000 Census form, people of Spanish/Hispanic/Latino origin could identify themselves as Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, or "other Spanish/Hispanic/Latino." More than 35 million people identified themselves as Hispanic or Latino on the 2000 Census.
www.infoplease.com /spot/hhm1.html

  
 Hispanic Heritage Month
The term Hispanic, as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, refers to Spanish-speaking people in the United States of any race.
On the 2000 Census form, people of Spanish/Hispanic/Latino origin could identify themselves as Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, or "other Spanish/Hispanic/Latino." More than 35 million people identified themselves as Hispanic or Latino on the 2000 Census.
Hispanic Heritage Month begins on September 15, the anniversary of independence for five Latin American countries—Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua.
www.factmonster.com /spot/hhm1.html   (160 words)

  
 Hispanic Heritage Month
The term Hispanic, as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, refers to Spanish-speaking people in the United States of any race.
On the 2000 Census form, people of Spanish/Hispanic/Latino origin could identify themselves as Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, or "other Spanish/Hispanic/Latino." More than 35 million people identified themselves as Hispanic or Latino on the 2000 Census.
Hispanic Heritage Month begins on September 15, the anniversary of independence for five Latin American countries—Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua.
www.infoplease.com /spot/hhm1.html   (173 words)

  
 Multiracial
The census takers had intended " Hispanic " to be a different dimension to other categories, so it would include "White Hispanic", "Black Hispanic" and so on, so these people disappeared from the mixed-race figures in the 2002 estimates.
But multiracial people won a victory of sorts with the 2000 United States Census, which allowed participants to select more than one of the six available categories, which were, in brief: White, Black, Asian, Native North American, Pacific Island, Other.
Apparently contradicting this, more recent census data shows the population of England (in lieu of the UK) to be 1.3% mixed-race (2001), compared with, for example, 1.4% in the USA (2002 estimates, see below).
www.asinah.net /articles/content/m/mu/multiracial.html   (173 words)

  
 Census race
Hispanic Population of the United States (Census Bureau)
Race and Hispanic Origin Population Density of the United States: 1990--The four map themes are: American Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut Persons; Asian and Pacific Islander Persons; Black Persons; and Hispanic Origin Persons.
Profile of the Foreign-Born Population in the United States (2000 Census data)
www.libraries.psu.edu /socialsciences/census/censusrace.htm   (152 words)

  
 Roger Clegg on NRO
Earlier census data had found that, over the last 20 years, the number of marriages between blacks and whites has more than quadrupled (white-Hispanic and white-Asian marriages are even more common).
USA Today this week, also reporting on census data (collected in a March 2000 survey), pointed out that “wide differences exist for subgroups within the Hispanic population” in level of education.
Indeed, the multi-race option was added to the census form in large part because of pressure from the increasing number of those who are either in multi-race marriages or are the product of them.
www.nationalreview.com /contributors/clegg030701.shtml   (826 words)

  
 Claritas
PL94 data are Census 2000 counts provided to states for use in legislative redistricting.
Summary File 3 (SF3) includes social, economic and housing characteristics compiled from a sample of approximately 19 million housing units that received the Census 2000 long-form questionnaire.
Claritas continues to provide enhanced 2000 Census data at no cost–including additional Claritas calculated variables, a variety of retrieval options and pre-formatted reports.
www.clusterbigip1.claritas.com /PL94/Default.jsp   (826 words)

  
 March 2
The leaders we interviewed feared the possibility that overall Hispanic leaders are not prepared to deal with the enormous task the Census numbers represent.
U.S. Bureau of the Census, Current Population Reports, The Hispanic Population in the United States, March 2002 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office)
He states, “In the Hispanic Church we are struggling with two conflicting paradigms, the paradigm of the American mindset versus the deeply ingrained Latin American mindset.” In general, the American approach promotes planning by establishing a process, selecting a successor, and having a smooth transition into retirement.
www.fuller.edu /news/alumnews/mentoring_hispanic_leaders.htm   (826 words)

  
 Education World ® - Lesson Planning: Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month!
For purposes of the U.S. Census, Hispanic Americans today are identified according to the parts of the world that they or their ancestors came from, including Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Spain, or the nations of Central or South America.
Today, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, more than 37 million people in the United States are of Hispanic origin.
Teaching of the contributions of Hispanic Americans, and learning about the cultures from which they come, will be the focal point of many classroom activities and discussions in the weeks ahead as students across the United States recognize Hispanic Heritage Month -- September 15 to October 15.
www.education-world.com /a_lesson/lesson023.shtml   (826 words)

  
 CenStats Databases
Included are 512 detailed occupations by race, hispanic origin and sex tabulated from the 1990 census.
Census of Population and Housing Public Law 94-171 Data Age by Race and Hispanic Origin
Census Tract Street Locator is now included in the American FactFinder (based on Census 2000 boundaries)
censtats.census.gov   (174 words)

  
 Race (U.S. Census) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the 2000 census the Census Bureau considers race to be separate from Hispanic origin.
Census 2000 Brief: Race and Hispanic Origin (PDF document)
The United States Census Bureau uses the federal government's definitions of race when performing a census.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Race_(US_Census)   (749 words)

  
 Population of the United States by Race and Hispanic/Latino Origin, Census 2000 and July 1, 2004
Population of the United States by Race and Hispanic/Latino Origin, Census 2000 and July 1, 2004
More on Population of the United States by Race and Hispanic Latino Origin Census 2000 and July 1 2004 from Infoplease:
Population- U.S. Census Timeline Profile of General Demographic Characteristics, Census 2000 Population by...
www.infoplease.com /ipa/A0762156.html   (216 words)

  
 What is New for Census 2000? -- Reference, Davis Library
Occupation "The Census Bureau currently uses the 1980 Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) to classify responses to its household surveys.
Racial and Ethnic Classifications Used in Census 2000 and Beyond.
Profiles of General Demographic Characteristics, 2000 Census of Population and Housing, United States, 2000.
www.lib.unc.edu /reference/govinfo/census/new2000.html   (485 words)

  
 INTERRACIAL VOICE - Guest Editorial (Naomi Zack)
In March 2000, when government began distributing the census forms, the New York Times reported that the five racial categories and their possible combinations would yield sixty-three recognized racial categories, a number that would be doubled by the options in the "Spanish/Hispanic/Latino" category.
The lack of either explicitly structured taxonomies or criteria for membership in specific categories suggests that those who composed the census form assumed that Americans have unequivocal and ready answers to questions about their identities in the Spanish/Hispanic/Latino category, and in terms of race.
As David Goldberg argues, although the U.S. Census is now broadly regarded as a valuable resource for corporate planning and a basis for various government allocations and representation, it has not provided a stable system of racial categorization from decade to decade.
interracialvoice.com /zack.html   (6268 words)

  
 Census 2000 Quick Links
The Census Bureau has determined that the A.C.E. estimates dramatically overstate the level of undercoverage in Census 2000, and that the adjusted Census 2000 data are, therefore, not better than the unadjusted data.
For Census 2000 data, the DP-1 table is available as part of the Summary File 1 (SF1) data set, and the other three tables are available as part of the Summary File 3 (SF3) data set.
This information is based on answers to the questions in the Census 2000 Short-Form questionnaire.
ssdc.ucsd.edu /ssdc/cen2k.html   (2994 words)

  
 ASNE - Hispanic representatives looking for more after meeting with Bush
Census figures show that the Hispanic population in the United States grew by 60.7% between 1990 and 2000, tripling in some states.
According to Rep. Gutiérrez, President Bush said he was against a blanket amnesty for the six to 11 million undocumented immigrants that the census reports are in this country.
Caucus members also said they are concerned that the president’s proposed tax plan would endanger programs geared toward small-business owners of color.
www.asne.org /2001reporter/wednesday/caucus4.html   (477 words)

  
 CenStats Databases
Included are 512 detailed occupations by race, hispanic origin and sex tabulated from the 1990 census.
1990 Census of Population and Housing Public Law 94-171 Data Age by Race and Hispanic Origin
Census Tract Street Locator is now included in the American FactFinder (based on Census 2000 boundaries)
censtats.census.gov   (175 words)

  
 CenStats Databases
Included are 512 detailed occupations by race, hispanic origin and sex tabulated from the 1990 census.
Census of Population and Housing Public Law 94-171 Data Age by Race and Hispanic Origin
Census Tract Street Locator is now included in the American FactFinder (based on Census 2000 boundaries)
censtats.census.gov   (174 words)

  
 Homepage - CADSR - University of Delaware
SF1 State, counties, and census county divisions SPSS(sav)
SF3 State, counties, and census county divisions SPSS(sav)
The C2SS is not a substitute for Census 2000 sample
www.cadsr.udel.edu /census2k   (541 words)

  
 CenStats Databases
Included are 512 detailed occupations by race, hispanic origin and sex tabulated from the 1990 census.
Census of Population and Housing Public Law 94-171 Data Age by Race and Hispanic Origin
Census Tract Street Locator is now included in the American FactFinder (based on Census 2000 boundaries)
censtats.census.gov   (174 words)

  
 California Minority Populations Become Majority For First Time [Free Republic]
Asians and Hispanics are the fastest growing of the state's ethnic groups, with both populations increasing by nearly 35 percent between 1990 and 1999, according to the census projections.
The majority now becomes the minority, at least in the eyes of the census bureau, and the economic and political fallout of this will be very interesting.
Perhaps it could be said that whites no longer make up a plurality of the population, but certainly they're still the majority race in terms of a percentage of population.
www.freerepublic.com /forum/a39ac8a1e6326.htm   (3960 words)

  
 Hispanic : search word
The term Hispanic is used as a form of classification for the immigrants and descendants of a wide range of ethnicities, races and nationalities, foreign and native born, who use either English or Spanish as their primary language.
According to the US Census Bureau, Hispanics form an ethnic group and defines ethnicity as "the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the United States".
Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorise US citizens, permanent residents and temporary immigrants, whose background hail either from the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or relating to a Spanish-speaking culture.
www.searchword.org /hi/hispanic.html   (2113 words)

  
 Hispanic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Its usage as an ethnic indicator in the United States is believed to have come into mainstream prominence following its inclusion in a question in the 1980 U.S. Census, which asked people to voluntarily identify if they were of "Spanish/Hispanic origin or descent".
Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize persons whose ancestry hails either from Spain, the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America, or the original settlers of the traditionally Spanish-held Southwestern United States.
Hispanic growth rate over the July 1, 2003 to July 1, 2004 period was of 3.6 % - higher than any other ethnic group in the United States, and in fact more than three times the rate of the nation's total population (at 1.0 %).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Hispanic   (3196 words)

  
 Hispanic. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
Furthermore, Hispanic—the term used by the U.S. Census Bureau and other government agencies—is said to bear the stamp of an Anglo establishment far removed from the concerns of the Spanish-speaking community.
Of the two, only Hispanic can be used in referring to Spain and its history and culture; a native of Spain residing in the United States is a Hispanic, not a Latino, and one cannot substitute Latino in the phrase the Hispanic influence on native Mexican cultures without garbling the meaning.
Hispanic, from the Latin word for “Spain,” has the broader reference, potentially encompassing all Spanish-speaking peoples in both hemispheres and emphasizing the common denominator of language among communities that sometimes have little else in common.
www.bartleby.com /61/60/H0216000.html   (439 words)

  
 HispanicTrending
About 60 percent of Hispanics living in the United States are U.S. born, according to the U.S. Census of 2000.
In Lee public schools, Hispanic children comprised 62 percent of the enrollment growth between the start of the past school year and the start of this one.
The Hispanic population in the U.S. is on average younger than the overall population.
juantornoe.blogs.com   (8268 words)

  
 Education World ® Lesson Planning: Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month!
For purposes of the U.S. Census, Hispanic Americans today are identified according to the parts of the world that they or their ancestors came from, including Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Spain, or the nations of Central or South America.
Teaching of the contributions of Hispanic Americans, and learning about the cultures from which they come, will be the focal point of many classroom activities and discussions in the weeks ahead as students across the United States recognize Hispanic Heritage Month -- September 15 to October 15.
Many Hispanic Americans trace their roots to the cultures of the indigenous peoples of the Americas-- including the Arawaks (Puerto Rico), the Aztecs (Mexico), the Incas (South America), the Maya (Central America), and the Tainos (in Cuba, Puerto Rico and other places).
www.educationworld.com /a_lesson/lesson/lesson023.shtml   (1699 words)

  
 Hispanic Heritage Month
Hispanic Population of the United States As recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau - many, many statistics.
Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Organization whose programs are designed to increase the participation of your Hispanics in the public and private sector.
Hispanic Heritage All Year Long An article on Hispanic cultural centers such as El Museo del Barrio.
www.mcps.k12.md.us /curriculum/socialstd/Hispanic.html   (431 words)

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