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Topic: History of Nauru


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In the News (Thu 23 Nov 17)

  
  Nauru - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Nauru is a special member of the Commonwealth and joined the United Nations as a member state in 1999.
Nauru is a small phosphate rock island in the South Pacific Ocean, south of the Marshall Islands.
Nauru's climate is extremely humid year-round because of its proximity to the Equator.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Nauru   (1224 words)

  
 History of Nauru - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The 1886 Anglo-German Convention led to the annexation of Nauru by Germany in 1888.
In 2001, Nauru was brought to world attention by the saga of the MV Tampa, a Norwegian cargo ship at the centre of a diplomatic dispute between Australia, Norway and Indonesia.
Nauru was also approached by the U.S. with a deal to modernize Nauru's infrastructure in exchange for suppression of the island's lax banking laws that allow activities that are illegal in other countries to flourish.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/History_of_Nauru   (783 words)

  
 Excite España - Viajes - Australia Y Pacifico Sur - Nauru - HistoryGovernment
Nauru is one of the world’s smallest and most remote sovereign states and was one of the many Pacific islands first settled centuries ago by the dauntless seafaring Polynesian and Melanesian explorers.
Nauru’s first head of state was the Head Chief, Hammer DeRoburt, who held power for most of the time between independence and 1989 (in 1976, Parliament unseated DeRoburt after some members objected to his autocratic style, but he was re-elected two years later, winning further elections in 1980, 1983 and 1986).
Nauru is one of seven nations which, in April 2002, were ‘named and shamed’ by the OECD because of their failure to tackle the problem.
www.excite.es /viajes/guias/australia_y_pacifico_sur/nauru/HistoryGovernment   (1030 words)

  
 History of Nauru -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Nauru had little contact with the outside world until (Click link for more info and facts about whaling) whaling ships and other traders began to visit in the (The decade from 1830 to 1839) 1830s.
Nauru finally joined the (An organization of independent states formed in 1945 to promote international peace and security) UN in 1999.
In 2001, Nauru was brought to world attention by the saga of the (Click link for more info and facts about MV Tampa) MV Tampa, a Norwegian cargo ship at the centre of a diplomatic dispute between Australia, Norway and Indonesia.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/h/hi/history_of_nauru.htm   (1073 words)

  
 Nauru Country Guide - History and Government - World Travel Guide Provided By Columbus Travel Publishing
History: Nauru is one of the world’s smallest and most remote sovereign states and was one of the many Pacific islands first settled centuries ago by the dauntless seafaring Polynesian and Melanesian explorers.
Nauru was captured by Australian forces in 1914 and continued under Australian rule (other than a period of Japanese occupation from 1942 to 1945) until independence was granted in 1968.
Nauru sought compensation from the British, Australian and New Zealand governments, and after lengthy and heated negotiations a Compact of Settlement was signed in August 1993; Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom all proffered contributions.
www.columbusguides.com /data/nru/nru580.asp   (511 words)

  
 NAURU Information on Government, People, History, Economy, Environment, Development   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Nauru shares an overwhelming geographic isolation with her scattered island neighbours.
In 1968, the United Nations Trusteeship was terminated and Nauru became an independent Republic with a Westminister style government established by the Constitution.
In that same year, Nauru became a Special Member of the Commonwealth and was then accepted as a Full Member of the Commonwealth in 1999.
www.un.int /nauru/overview.html   (473 words)

  
 ljonn.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Nauru is so small that a phosphate stockpile occupies a prominent position in the center of their national map.
In fact, Nauru is so very tiny that one of their national holidays (Angam Day) actually celebrates the times in history when the population reached 1500 people.
John F. Kennedy's PT 109 was rammed and sunk near Nauru in August 1943 and the surviving crew swam from the wreckage to safety there.
www.ljonn.com /nauru.html   (507 words)

  
 NAURU FACTS AND INFORMATION
The Republic of Nauru (pronounced //), formerly known as Pleasant Island, is an island republic in the South Pacific_Ocean.
Nauru currently houses a detention centre, which holds and processes asylum_seekers as part of Australia's Pacific_Solution.
The first European to arrive was Captain John_Fearn in 1798, but Nauru continued as an independent island society, reigned by a king (the most widely known being King Auweyida), until it was annexed by Germany in 1888 to German_New_Guinea.
www.palfacts.com /Nauru   (1101 words)

  
 Search Results for "Nauru"
Background:Nauru's phosphate deposits began to be mined early in the 20th century by a German-British consortium; the island was occupied by Australian forces in...
Inhabited by a population of mainly Polynesian ancestry, Nauru was explored by the British in 1798 and became a German protectorate...
...and Barbuda (1967), Dominica (1967), Saint Kitts and Nevis (1967), Saint Lucia (1967), Nauru (1968), Mauritius (1968), Swaziland (1968), Saint Vincent and the Grenadines...
www.bartleby.com /cgi-bin/texis/webinator/sitesearch?FILTER=&query=Nauru   (268 words)

  
 Nauru
Nauru's capital is Yaren administrative center Nauru is the smallest republic in the world and has no capital.
Nauru existed as an independent island society until it was annexed by Germany in 1888 as part of the Marshall Islands Protectorate.
During a 1994 visit to Nauru, a piece of Betty flap was found near the wing behind the airfield.
www.pacificwrecks.com /provinces/nauru.html   (465 words)

  
 Weather & History | Nauru Travel Information | Lonely Planet Destination Guide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Nauru won full independence in 1968, when it was accorded special member status of the Commonwealth.
Under Nauru's Constitution, the Trust should have paid a percentage of phosphate royalties into a fund to finance rehabilitation of the trashed landscape.
Nauru will face enormous financial difficulties when the phosphate is mined out.
www.lonelyplanet.com /worldguide/destinations/pacific/nauru/essential?a=culture   (789 words)

  
 Charting the Pacific - Places
Nauru has adopted a republican system based on a national parliament of 18 members elected by popular vote for a three year term.
Nauru has accepted in 2001 the request from Australia to host asylum seekers to be processed there (the so-called "Pacific solution").
Nauru is one of the three 'rock phosphate' islands of the Pacific, the others being Banaba (Kiribati) and Makatea (French Polynesia).
www.abc.net.au /ra/pacific/places/country/nauru.htm   (670 words)

  
 History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Not much is known of traditional Nauruan life, and even less about the island's history until Captain John Fearn came across it in 1798 as he was sailing from New Zealand to China.
In 1899 a British prospecting company discovered Nauru was nearly solid phoshpate underfoot - a precious commodity as European soils were becoming exhausted and Australian ones were proving none too fertile.
The Nauru Phosphate Royalties Trust invests money from the sale of phosphate and has extensive investments in Australia, Hawaii and other countries as insurance for the day when the phosphate mining grinds to a halt.
www.pacificislandtravel.com /nauru/about_destin/history.asp   (657 words)

  
 History of Nauru
Nauru had little contact with Europeans until whaling ships and other traders began to visit in the 1830s.
A plan by the partner governments to resettle the Nauruans (because of disappearing phosphate and damage to the island caused by extensive mining) on Curtis Island, off the north coast of Queensland, Australia, was abandoned in 1964 when the islanders decided to stay put.
In 1989 Nauru filed suit against Australia in the International Court of Justice in The Hague for damages caused by mining while the island was under Australian jurisdiction.
www.historyofnations.net /oceania/nauru.html   (478 words)

  
 Foreign & Commonwealth Office Country Profiles
Nauru's terrain consists of a sandy beach rising to a fertile ring around raised coral reefs with a phosphate plateau in the centre.
Nauru attracted international attention in 2001 by agreeing to a request from Australia to accommodate around 800 asylum seekers bound for Australia, including a number who were recovered from their sinking boat by the Norwegian ship, the Tampa.
Nauru was granted full membership of the Commonwealth in May 1999 (it was previously a Special Member) and was admitted as the 187th member of the United Nations on 14 September 1999.
www.fco.gov.uk /servlet/Front?pagename=OpenMarket/Xcelerate/ShowPage&c=Page&cid=1007029394365&a=KCountryProfile&aid=1019041552632   (1235 words)

  
 Nauru: history   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Nauru, which lies in the central Pacific, was originally populated by migrating Polynesian, Micronesian and Melanesian people.
Whaling ships often called at Nauru during the 19th century, until it was annexed by the German Second Reich in 1888.
In 1899, Nauru was found to have phosphate-rich rock which made it one of the wealthiest territories in the world.
gbgm-umc.org /country_profiles/country_history.cfm?Id=100   (765 words)

  
 Nauru (09/05)
Nauru is a small oval-shaped island in the western Pacific Ocean, located just 42 kilometers (26 mi.) south of the Equator.
Nauru does not currently have an embassy in the United States but does have a UN Mission at 800 2d Ave, Suite 400D, New York, New York 10017 (tel: 212-937-0074, fax: 212-937-0079).
Nauru was admitted to the United Nations in 1999.
www.state.gov /r/pa/ei/bgn/16447.htm   (1990 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Nauru   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
In 2001 Nauru became host to approximately 1,000 asylum seekers, mostly Afghan, who were intercepted while attempting to enter Australia illegally.
Nauru reportedly received about $10 million in assistance from Australia in exchange for agreeing to house the refugees while their asylum applications are adjudicated.
Images, some of which are used under the doctrine of Fair use or used with permission, may not be available.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Nauru   (949 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: History of Nauru   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch Whaling is the hunting and killing of whales.
Events and Trends Electromagnetic induction discovered by Michael Faraday Dutch-speaking farmers known as Voortrekkers emigrate northwards from the Cape Colony Croquet invented in Ireland Railroad construction begins in earnest in the United States Egba refugees fleeing the Yoruba civil wars found the city of Abeokuta in south-west Nigeria...
A view of Chuuk Chuuk is an island group that comprises one of the four states of the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), along with Kosrae, Pohnpei, and Yap.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/History-of-Nauru   (1726 words)

  
 Nauru - A Short History
The people of Nauru were fortunately able to carry on their traditional life without undue imposition by the British Phosphate Commissioners (B.P.C.).
Following the evacuation of Nauru on the 23rd February 1942, only a few months elapsed before the Japanese occupied the island and little is known about what transpired on the island at that time.
In September, 1943, a 1,000 vessel running between Nauru and Ocean Island were sunk by bombers and in the same month a 6,000 ton cargo vessel carrying large supplies of petrol and provisions were torpedoed by an American submarine about two miles off shore, and sank with heavy losses of life.
www.janeresture.com /nauru_history   (1967 words)

  
 netcyclo: Nauru: History
Twelve tribes lived on the island of Nauru at the time that it was first 'discovered' by Captain John Fearn, while sailing in the British whaling ship 'Hunter' between New Zealand and China in 1798.
After the war, Nauru was made a United Nations Trust Territory under Australian administration and when the 733 survivors from Truk Island returned in 1945-6, they found a native population of less than 1000 remaining.
The movement succeeded, and Nauru became independent on 31 January 1968, as the smallest independent republic in the world (a record which it still holds).
www.netcyclo.com /places/polit/nations/nauru/nr-his.htm   (662 words)

  
 Nauru (12/03)
Nauru does not have an embassy in the United States but does have a UN Mission at 800 2d Ave, Suite 400D, New York, New York 10017 (tel: 212-937-0074, fax: 212-937-0079).
Air Nauru, the country's link to the outside world, has been periodically grounded in recent years due to problems paying for proper maintenance of its sole aircraft.
Nauru has been cited by the Financial Action Task Force as a noncooperative jurisdiction in the fight against money laundering.
www.state.gov /outofdate/bgn/n/35798.htm   (1535 words)

  
 NAURU, Country Information: Permanent Mission of the Republic of Nauru to the United Nations   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Nauru's victory against Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom in the International Court of Justice in 1993 marks an important point in the history of Nauru.
Nauru's environment had been devastated by more than sixty years of phosphate mining by former colonial powers.
Following independence, a Commission of Inquiry was established by the Nauru Government to examine the rehabilitation of worked-out phosphate lands.
www.un.int /nauru/country.html   (773 words)

  
 Nauru
Nauru (pronounced NAH-oo-roo) is an island in the Pacific just south of the equator, about 2,500 mi (4,023 km) southwest of Honolulu.
Nauru appealed to the International Court of Justice to compensate for the damage from almost a century of phosphate strip-mining by foreign companies.
Nauru - Nauru, officially Republic of Nauru, atoll and independent republic (1995 est.
www.factmonster.com /ipka/A0107816.html   (649 words)

  
 Nauru - Biocrawler definition:Nauru - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The Republic of Nauru (pronounced nah-OO-roo), formerly known as Pleasant Island, is an island republic in the South Pacific Ocean.
Nauru's climate is extremely muggy year-round because of its proximity to the Equator.
You can find it there under the keyword Nauru (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nauru)The list of previous authors is available here: version history (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Nauruandaction=history).
www.biocrawler.com /biowiki/Nauru   (1207 words)

  
 Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade: Pacific Division - Nauru Political, Economic and Relationship Country Paper   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Nauru does not have a formal party structure although the 2003 election saw the emergence of the Nauru First party led by David Adeang, which stood on an anti-corruption platform.
The Nauru Phosphate Royalties Trust (NPRT) was set up to invest the profits from the phosphate industry as a source of income for Nauru, but a number of the trust’s investments have been unsuccessful and the funds eroded.
Nauru is also a member of the newly formed sub-regional group of Micronesian countries that formed to co-operate on transport and trade links.
www.mft.govt.nz /foreign/regions/pacific/country/naurupaper.html   (1773 words)

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