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Topic: History of Yugoslavia


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  History of Yugoslavia
Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in all south Slavic languages, in Macedonian and Serbian Cyrillic Југославија) is a term used for three separate but successive political entities that existed during most of the 20th century on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe.
The third was called Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) and was formed in 1992 on the territory of the remaining republics of Serbia (including the autonomous provinces of Vojvodina and of Kosovo, officially known as Kosovo and Metohija) and Montenegro.
The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) was formed on April 28, 1992, and it consisted of the former Socialist Republics of Serbia and Montenegro.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/h/hi/history_of_yugoslavia.html   (3827 words)

  
  History of Yugoslavia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Yugoslavia became a militarist state, and in a similar vein, king Aleksandar was assassinated by Macedonian nationalists while visiting Marseille in 1934.
Yugoslavia's regent Paul actually signed the Tripartite Treaty in Vienna on March 25, 1941, but this was against the will of most Yugoslavs, and he was met by a coup d'état when he returned on March 27.
On November 25, 1942, the Anti-Fascist Council of National Liberation of Yugoslavia was convened in Bihać.
www.icyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/h/hi/history_of_yugoslavia.html   (1114 words)

  
 Yugoslavia: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com
...History of Yugoslavia History of Yugoslavia This is the history of the Yugoslav state.
Yugoslavia formed in 1918 as the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, renamed the "Kingdom of Yugoslavia" in 1929.
On February 4, 2003 the federal parliament of Yugoslavia dissolved the country and agreed to create a loose commonwealth of the remaining two states within a union.
www.encyclopedian.com /yu/Yugoslavia.html   (428 words)

  
 [No title]
The present Jewish population of Yugoslavia is estimated at approximately 5,500, the majority of whom reside in Belgrade, Zagreb and Sarajevo.
Although the regime in Yugoslavia is authoritarian, its internal structure is the most liberal of all Eastern European countries, and the Jewish community enjoys freedom both with regard to the organization of communal life and the conduct of religious and cultural activities, and most notably with regard to the community's ties with international Jewish organizations.
Yugoslavia had only one rabbi—Belgrade-based Cadik Danon—but by the late 1980s one young man was in Israel studying to become a rabbi, and several others were training as cantors or lay leaders for religious services.
www.porges.net /JewishHistoryOfYugoslavia.html   (8550 words)

  
 History of Yugoslavia - Glasgledius   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Yugoslavia's regent Paul actually signed the Tripartite Treaty in Vienna on March 25th, 1941, but this was against the will of most Yugoslavs, and he was met by a coup d'état when he returned on March 27th.
On November 25, 1942, the Anti-Fascist Council of National Liberation of Yugoslavia[?] was convened in Bihac[?].
The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia officially ceased to exist on April 28, 1992 when the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was formed.
www.glasglow.com /E2/se/Serbia_and_Montenegro___History.html   (873 words)

  
 History of Yugoslavia - Information from Reference.com
The Kingdom of Yugoslavia (December 1, 1918–April 17, 1941), also known as the First Yugoslavia, was a monarchy formed as the "Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes" after World War I and re-named on January 6, 1929 by Alexander I of Yugoslavia.
The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) (April 27, 1992–February 4, 2003), was a federation on the territory of the two remaining republics of Serbia (including the autonomous provinces of Vojvodina and Kosovo and Metohija) and Montenegro.
The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) was formed on April 28, 1992, and it consisted of the former Socialist Republics of Serbia and Montenegro.
www.reference.com /search?q=History+of+Yugoslavia   (6156 words)

  
 History of Yugoslavia
The metaphor was based on diversity in almost every aspect of Yugoslav national life--historical experiences, standard of living, the relationship of the people to the land, and religious, cultural, and political traditions--among the six republics and the two provinces that constituted the federal state.
One response to depolitization was the formation in November 1990 of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia-Movement for Yugoslavia by a group of retired YPA officers to replace the old LCY as an advocate of preserving the existing federal structure.
Croatia, with its long history of nationalist independence movements and a relatively prosperous economy, remained entangled in the militant demands of its Serbian minority and ultranationalist Croats, its economy disrupted by the Serbian occupation, destruction of urban centers, and a massive refugee movement.
www.motherearthtravel.com /yugoslavia/history.htm   (7530 words)

  
 1946-47. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
Yugoslavia concluded a series of political and economic agreements with Poland, Czechoslovakia, Albania, Bulgaria, and Hungary.
Despite Yugoslavia's close outward association with the Soviet Union, Tito repeatedly asserted Yugoslavia's own interests.
The COMINFORM EXPELLED YUGOSLAVIA from membership for doctrinal errors and hostility to the Soviet Union.
www.bartleby.com /67/3166.html   (164 words)

  
 History of Yugoslavia
Yugoslavia was an obstacle for these plans and King Aleksandar I was the pillar of the Yugoslav policy.
During an official visit to France in 1934, the king was assassinated in Marseilles by a member of VMRO - an extreme nationalist organization in Bulgaria that had plans to annex territories along the eastern and southern Yugoslav border - with the cooperation of the Ustashi - a Croatian separatist organization.
Serbia and Yugoslavia were among the countries that had the greatest losses in the war: 1 700 000 people (10.8% of the population).
www.kosovo.net /serhist2.html   (4497 words)

  
 History of Yugoslavia
This is the history of all three Yugoslav states.
This led to great losses for Yugoslavia, approximately one million people (the demographic loss was 1,700,000 people or 10% of the population).
Westerner attempts to reunite partisans and emigration loyal to the king led to the Tito-Subasic Agreement in June 1944, however Tito was seen as a national hero by the citizens and so he gained the power in post-war independent communist state, starting as a prime minister.
www.askfactmaster.com /History_of_Yugoslavia   (2001 words)

  
 Serbia Info / History of Serbia:The Kingdom of Yugoslavia (1918 - 1941)
With the end of World War I and the downfall of Austria-Hungary and the Ottoman Empire the conditions were met for proclaiming the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenians in December of 1918.
Yugoslavia was an obstacle for these plans and King Aleksandar I was the pillar of the Yugoslav policy.
During an official visit to France in 1934, the king was assassinated in Marseilles by a member of VMRO - an extreme nationalist organization in Bulgaria that had plans to annex territories along the eastern and southern Yugoslav border - with the cooperation of the Ustashi - a Croatian fascist separatist organization.
www.serbia-info.com /enc/history/kingdom.html   (489 words)

  
 Yugoslavia
Yugoslavia is a term casually used for three separate political entities.
The first was a kingdom formed in 1918 under name Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, whose name changed name to the Kingdom of Yugoslavia in 1929 and existed under that name until it was invaded in 1941 by Axis powers.
As a result a federation named Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was formed between the remaining republics of Serbia and Montenegro, which in 2003 remade its internal structure into a loose commonwealth and changed its name to Serbia and Montenegro.
www.teachersparadise.com /ency/en/wikipedia/y/yu/yugoslavia.html   (139 words)

  
 Yugoslavia's Political History: The country that has been a kindgom, federation, and socialist republic since 1918 once ...
Yugoslavia's Political History: The country that has been a kindgom, federation, and socialist republic since 1918 once comprised Croatia, Montenegro, Serbia, Slovenia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Macedonia.
Yugoslavia had many incarnations throughout the better part of the 20th century.
Rebecca West's Black Lamb and Grey Falcon is a record of her travels through Yugoslavia in during the years 1936, '37, and '38, while Yugoslavia was still the Kingdom of Yugoslavia.
eeuropeanhistory.suite101.com /article.cfm/what_was_yugoslavia_   (290 words)

  
 Bambooweb: History of Yugoslavia
This led to great losses for Yugoslavia, approximately one million people (the demographic loss was 1,700,000 people or 10% of the population).
Westerner attempts to reunite partisans and emigration loyal to the king led to the Tito-Subasic Agreement in June 1944, however Tito was seen as a national hero by the citizens and so he gained the power in post-war independent communist state, starting as a prime minister.
The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia officially ceased to exist on April 28, 1992, when the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) was formed.
www.bambooweb.com /articles/h/i/History_of_Yugoslavia.html   (1986 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Partisans (Yugoslavia)
The Yugoslav partisans were the main anti-fascist resistance movement which fought against the occupation of Yugoslavia by Axis forces during World War II.
The uniting force of the anti-fascist partisans on the territory were the People's Liberation Army and Partisan detachments of Yugoslavia (NOV i POJ; Narodnooslobodilačka vojska i partizanski odredi Jugoslavije) under the command of Yugoslav Communist Party and Josip Broz (who went by the nom de guerre of Tito).
Although Red Army facilitated the liberation, the amount of organization among the NLA and the favorable position of Yugoslavia in Europe resulted in the country being one of the few Axis-occupied European countries to mostly liberate itself and not be encumbered by foreign army presence after the end of the war.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Partisans_%28Yugoslavia%29   (416 words)

  
 Brief History of Yugoslavia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Before the aftermath of the First World War, the history of Yugoslavia is that of Serbia, Croatia, Slovenia, Montenegro, Macedonia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Yugoslavia (the land of the southern Slavs) was formed in 1918 as the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes under king Peter I, its capital in Belgrade (the Roman Singidunum).
After the start of World War II, Yugoslavia tried to maintain a neutral stance, but on March 1941 it was forced to sign a treaty of alliance with Germany setting off tumultuous protests that resulted in the deposition of the regency by the military.
www.worldhistoryplus.com /history/y/Yugoslavia_brief.htm   (1041 words)

  
 >The history of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (1929 - 2003)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
The history of the Province of Montenegro to February 2003
The history of the Province of Macedonia to June 1991
The history of the Province of Serbia to February 2003
www.hartford-hwp.com /archives/62/index-o.html   (165 words)

  
 Yugoslavia (Former) : Country Studies - Federal Research Division, Library of Congress
Yugoslavia (Former) : Country Studies - Federal Research Division, Library of Congress
Histories of the Yugoslav People to World War I
The Balkan War, World War I, and the Formation of Yugoslavia (1912-1918)
lcweb2.loc.gov /frd/cs/yutoc.html   (117 words)

  
 Religious aspects of the Yugoslavia - Vojvodina Conflict
A religious/ethnic conflict is escalating in Vojvodina, (Vajdaság in Hungarian) the northern-most province of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
The government of Yugoslavia is controlled by Serbs, of whom the vast majority are members of the Serbian Orthodox Church.
An essay is available which describes the history of Yugoslavia and surrounding area.
www.religioustolerance.org /war_vojv.htm   (1331 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
As the leader of the communist resistance, Tito was a target for the Axis forces in occupied Yugoslavia.
Because of its neutrality, Yugoslavia would often be one of the only Communist countries to have diplomatic relations with right-wing, anti-Communist governments (an example being Paraguay under Alfredo Stroessner).
In Yugoslavia the Communist Party, led by Yugoslav communist Josip Broz Tito—the man with blue eyes on a white horse—started the resistance against the Germans and Italians as well as against the Serb and Croat nationalist extremists who were waging war against each other.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Josip_Broz_Tito   (3999 words)

  
 uksearch.com : Society: History: By Region: Europe: Yugoslavia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Teaching about Conflict and Crisis in the Former Yugoslavia: The Case of Bosnia-Hercegovina - Provides facts and explanations about the peoples and places of the former Yugoslavia, including Bosnia-Hercegovina; the collapse of Yugoslavia and the crisis in Bosnia-Hercegovina or "Bosnia;" and the causes, conditions, and consequences of the Bosnian war.
World War II in Yugoslavia - Timeline of the world war, civil war, and revolution, with information about the armies involved (Tito's partisans, ustashe, chetniks, etc.) battles and operations fought, and weapons used.
Yugoslavia - A Country Study - US Library of Congress Area Handbook, dating from 1990, focuses on the history of the former Yugoslavia.
www.uksearch.com /scripts/dir.aspx?cat=Top%2fSociety%2fHistory%2fBy_Region%2fEurope%2fYugoslavia   (231 words)

  
 History of Yugoslavia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
The country was unitary until the mid 1960s, when the suppression of national identities escalated with the Croatian spring of 1970-71, when students in Zagreb organized demonstrations for greater civil liberties and greater Croatian autonomy.
On the 14th Congress of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia, the delegation of Serbia led by Milošević insisted on the reversal of 1974 Constitution policy that empowered the republics and rather wanted to introduce a policy of "one person, one vote", which would empower the majority population, the Serbs.
This caused the Slovenian and Croatian delegations (led by Milan Kučan and Ivica Račan, resp.) to leave the Congress in protest and marked a culmination in the rift of the ruling party.
www.ohiostatecenter.com /guide/article.History_of_Yugoslavia.htm   (1779 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Yugoslavia as History: Twice there was a Country: Books: John R. Lampe   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-17)
Yugoslavia as History is the first book to examine the bloody demise of the former Yugoslavia in the full light of its history.
Lampe's "Yugoslavia as History" is probably the first book that deals with the entire history of Yugoslavia from its inception in 1918 to its collapse in 1991.
Lampe's primary expertise is economic history, and this is evident in his strong analysis of Yugoslavia's frequent economic problems, which would be a crucial factor in the country's eventual downfall.
www.amazon.com /Yugoslavia-History-Twice-there-Country/dp/0521774012   (1516 words)

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