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Topic: Homeostasis


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In the News (Fri 19 Apr 19)

  
  Homeostasis - MSN Encarta
Homeostasis is the property of either an open system or a closed system, especially a living organism, that regulates its internal environment so as to maintain a stable...
The concept of homeostasis was first outlined by Claude Bernard, a 19th-century French physiologist who said, “The constancy of the internal environment is a condition of free life”.
The term “homeostasis” was coined by Walter Cannon in 1926 to refer to the body's capacity to regulate the composition and volume of the blood, and hence all the fluid bathing the cells of the body—the “extracellular fluid”.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761577951/Homeostasis.html   (1174 words)

  
 BioEd Online Slides: homeostasis, internal regulation, pancreas, insulin
Homeostasis is a term that refers to constancy in a system.
To physiologists, homeostasis means "maintaining a constant internal environment." The internal environment usually is thought of as the extra-cellular fluid (ECF) that constantly bathes the cells, providing nutrients and carrying away wastes.
He wrote prolifically on the subject and was a pioneer in the study of the autonomic nervous system's role in maintaining homeostasis.
www.bioedonline.org /slides/slide01.cfm?q=homeostasis   (1358 words)

  
 Physiological Homeostasis - Biology Online
This occurrence is known as physiological homeostasis, translating in layman's terms to the physical equilibrium.
In light of this, the feedback mechanism in such warm blooded animals is essential in regards to allowing the body to work in optimal conditions - so any change in from the norm in temperature is corrected by the feedback mechanism.
Homeostasis has survival value because it means an animal can adapt to a changing environment.
www.biology-online.org /4/1_physiological_homeostasis.htm   (399 words)

  
  Biology4Kids.com: Animal Systems: System Regulation
Homeostasis is a term that is used to both describe the survival of organisms in an ecosystem and to describe the successful survival of cells inside of an organism.
Organisms and populations can maintain homeostasis in an environment when they have a steady level of births and deaths.
Homeostasis is achieved by making sure the temperature, pH (acidity), and oxygen levels (and many other factors) are set just right for your cells to survive.
www.biology4kids.com /files/systems_regulation.html   (476 words)

  
  Homeostasis
Homeostasis or homoeostasis is the property of an open system, especially living organisms, to regulate its internal environment so as to maintain a stable condition, by means of multiple dynamic equilibrium adjustments controlled by interrelated regulation mechanisms.
Homeostasis should be thought of as a general characterization of many normal processes in concert, not their proximal cause per se.
Sociologists and psychologists may refer to "stress homeostasis", the tendency of a population or an individual to stay at a certain level of stress, often generating artificial stresses if the "natural" level of stress is not enough.
www.ibpassociation.org /encyclopedia/Biology/Homeostasis.php   (1142 words)

  
  Homeostasis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Homeostasis is the property of an open system, especially living organisms, to regulate its internal environment to maintain a stable, constant condition, by means of multiple dynamic equilibrium adjustments, controlled by interrelated regulation mechanisms.
Ecological homeostasis is found in a climax community of maximum permitted biodiversity, given the prevailing ecological conditions.
In disturbed ecosystems or sub-climax biological communities such as the island of Krakatoa, after its major eruption in 1883, the established stable homeostasis of the previous forest climax ecosystem was destroyed and all life eliminated from the island.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Homeostasis   (2010 words)

  
 Homeostasis
Homeostasis is the property of an open system to regulate its internal environment so as to maintain a stable condition, by means of multiple dynamic equilibrium adjustments controlled by interrelated regulation mechanisms.
The term usually is used in the sense of biological homeostasis.
All sorts of factors affect the suitability of the human body fluids to sustain life; these include properties like temperature, salinity, acidity (carbon dioxide), and the concentrations of nutrients and wastes (urea, glucose, various ion, oxygen).
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/h/ho/homeostasis.html   (835 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Homeostasis
Homeostasis is the property of an open system, especially living organisms, to regulate its internal environment to maintain a stable, constant condition, by means of multiple dynamic equilibrium adjustments, controlled by interrelated regulation mechanisms.
In disturbed ecosystems or sub-climax biological communities such as the island of Krakatoa, after its major eruption in 1883, the established stable homeostasis of the previous forest climax ecosystem was destroyed and all life eliminated from the island.
But trees too fall to the forest floor and a healthy forest glade is dependent upon a constant rate of forest regrowth, produced by the fall of logs, and the recycling of forest nutrients through the respiration of termites and other insect, fungal and bacterial decomposers.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Homeostasis   (1318 words)

  
 homeostasis   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Homeostasis is the name given to the dynamic processes that enable optimum conditions to be maintained for constituent cells, in spite of continual changes taking place both internally and externally.
Homeostasis is the maintenance of a relatively stable and optimal internal environment in the face of changing patterns of activity and a changing external environment.
Homeostasis is the maintenance by living organisms of a relatively stable internal environment even though changes are occurring in activity levels and in the external environment.
www.nurseminerva.co.uk /homeosta.htm   (4364 words)

  
 ICPA - Subluxations, Homeostasis, & Hormonal Imbalance
The word "homeostasis" describes the body's ability to maintain relatively stable internal conditions even though the outside world is constantly changing.
Homeostasis indicates a dynamic state of equilibrium or a balance in which internal conditions change and vary but always within relatively narrow limits.
When the body is in a state of homeostasis, the precise amount of hormones are released into the bloodstream and things proceed smoothly.
www.icpa4kids.org /research/articles/childhood/SUBLUXATIONS.htm   (2286 words)

  
 Homeostasis
For the purposes of homeostasis, and depending on the type of stimulus received, an organism makes use of two general mechanisms: positive feedback and negative feedback.
Positive feedback aims to augment the original stimulus (such as the increase of milk produced in response to a baby’s suckling) while negative feedback aims to lessen the original stimulus (such as thermoregulation, when the body decreases its temperature as a result of heavy physical exertion).
Homeostasis mainly regards biological organisms, but it can also used to describe the self-regulating properties of the planet Earth.
www.iscid.org /encyclopedia/Homeostasis   (197 words)

  
 homeostasis
In humans, homeostasis in the blood (which provides fluid for all tissues) is ensured by several organs.
Homeostasis is the keeping of this internal environment stable.
Conditions that are regulated in homeostasis include blood glucose level, temperature, water content of the body, and the amount of carbon dioxide and urea being carried by the blood.
www.tiscali.co.uk /reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0008030.html   (443 words)

  
 Homeostasis
Homeostasis in layman's terms means balance or equilibrium.
It is the property of an open system to regulate its internal environment so as to maintain a stable condition, by means of multiple dynamic equilibrium adjustments controlled by interrelated regulation mechanisms.
The term usually is used in the sense of biological homeostasis in humans and animals.
www.wordlookup.net /ho/homeostasis.html   (792 words)

  
 Homeostasis   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Homeostasis is the maintenance of equilibrium, or constant conditions, in a biological system by means of automatic mechanisms that counteract influences tending toward disequilibrium.
The term homeostasis was coined by the 20th-century American physiologist Walter B. Cannon, who refined and extended the concept of self-regulating mechanisms in living systems.
An example of homeostasis in cells is the phenomenon called contact inhibition, in which division in a population of cells stops when they become so numerous that they touch each other.
mcckc.edu /pennvalley/biology/lewis/homeo.htm   (528 words)

  
 Homeostasis Summary
Homeostasis is the sum total of all the biological responses that provide internal equilibrium and assure the maintenance of conditions for survival.
Homeostasis is the property of an open system, especially living organisms, to regulate its internal environment to maintain a stable, constant condition, by means of multiple dynamic equilibrium adjustments, controlled by interrelated regulation mechanisms.
Ecological homeostasis is found in a climax community of maximum permitted biodiversity, given the prevailing ecological conditions.
www.bookrags.com /Homeostasis   (6504 words)

  
 BiologyMad A-Level Biology
Homeostasis literally means “same state” and it refers to the process of keeping the internal body environment in a steady state.
In humans temperature homeostasis is controlled by the thermoregulatory centre in the hypothalamus.
Diabetes is a disease caused by a failure of glucose homeostasis.
www.biologymad.com /Homeostasis/Homeostasis.htm   (1661 words)

  
 Target Risk - Chapter 2
The term "homeostasis" does not refer to a fixed and invariable end result, or to an immutably fixed state of affairs, but to a particular kind of dynamic process that matches actual output to a target.
While homeostasis is a common feature in living organisms, this process has also been made to operate in many engineered devices such as washing machines and clothes driers, automatic pilots, humidifiers and dehumidifiers, cruise control in automobiles, refrigerators, air conditioning units and central heating.
This apparent contradiction may be one of the reasons that the process of homeostasis is sometimes misunderstood, but it is part and parcel of its nature.
pavlov.psyc.queensu.ca /target/chapter02.html   (2197 words)

  
 Mader
The systems of the body participate in maintaining homeostasis, that is, the relative constancy of the internal environment despite external environmental changes.
The hypothalamus is a portion of the brain particularly concerned with homeostasis; it influences the action of the medulla oblongata, a lower part of the brain, the autonomic nervous system, and the pituitary gland.
This illustrates that homeostasis is often regulated by the contrary actions of hormones.
www.mhhe.com /biosci/genbio/maderbiology/supp/homeo.html   (3861 words)

  
 Homeostasis
In 1932, impressed by "the wisdom of the body" capable of guaranteeing with such efficiency the control of the physiological equilibrium, Cannon coined the word homeostasis from two Greek words meaning to remain the same.
Since then the concept of homeostasy has had a central position in the field of cybernetics.
Homeostasis is one of the most remarkable and most typical properties of highly complex open systems.
pespmc1.vub.ac.be /HOMEOSTA.html   (643 words)

  
 BBC - GCSE Bitesize - Biology | Humans | Homeostasis
Home / Biology / Humans as organisms / Homeostasis
Homeostasis is the means by which these internal body conditions are kept constant.
Among the most important things our bodies need to regulate are: temperature, water and salt levels, and the amount of glucose in the blood.
www.bbc.co.uk /schools/gcsebitesize/biology/humansasorganisms/6homeostasisrev1.shtml   (320 words)

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