Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Horace Silver


Related Topics

In the News (Tue 23 Jul 19)

  
  Horace Silver - Biography - AOL Music
The hard bop style that Silver pioneered in the '50s is now dominant, played not only by holdovers from an earlier generation, but also by fuzzy-cheeked musicians who had yet to be born when the music fell out of critical favor in the '60s and '70s.
The band's first album, Horace Silver and the Jazz Messengers, was a milestone in the development of the genre that came to be known as hard bop.
Silver's piano style -- terse, imaginative, and utterly funky -- became a model for subsequent mainstream pianists to emulate.
music.aol.com /artist/horace-silver/7549/biography   (602 words)

  
 Horace Silver   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Silver studied piano and tenor saxophone at school, settling on the former instrument for his professional career.
By 1956 Silver was leading his own quintet, exploring the reaches of bop and becoming a founding father of the hard bop movement.
Silver's line-up - trumpet, tenor saxophone, piano, bass and drums - was subject to many changes over the years, but the calibre of musicians he hired was always very high.
musicstore.mymmode.com /artist.do?artistID=5958638   (458 words)

  
 PBS - JAZZ A Film By Ken Burns: Selected Artist Biography - Horace Silver
As a child Horace Silver was exposed to Cape Verdean folk music performed by his father, who was of Portuguese descent.
Silver remained with Getz for a year, during which time three of his compositions, Penny, Potter's Luck (written for Tommy Potter), and Split Kick, were recorded.
By 1951, Silver had developed sufficient confidence to move to New York, where he performed as a freelancer with such established professionals as Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Oscar Pettiford, and Art Blakey.
www.pbs.org /jazz/biography/artist_id_silver_horace.htm   (541 words)

  
 Horace Silver: Silver's Blue - PopMatters Music Review
Horace Silver is one of those jazz musicians who, by being more than usually successful became -- precisely as a result of his success -- more than usually overlooked.
Silver earned this distinction by playing the piano and writing tunes in a blues-drenched idiom that subsumed bebop into such a snappy package that his tunes would (in the 1980s and '90s) be pillaged for a million hip-hop samples.
Horace plays with a combination of childish innocence -- his melodies seeming simple and in the pocket -- and contrapuntal complexity, the left hand rumbling one and two-note statements as if they were written for a drummer.
www.popmatters.com /music/reviews/s/silverhorace-silversblue2005.shtml   (881 words)

  
 Horace Silver - Music Downloads - Online
The hard bop style that Silver pioneered in the '50s is now dominant, played not only by holdovers from an earlier generation, but also by fuzzy-cheeked musicians who had yet to be born when the music fell out of critical favor in the '60s and '70s.
Silver worked with Getz for a year, then began to freelance around the city with such big-time players as Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, and Oscar Pettiford.
Silver's piano style -- terse, imaginative, and utterly funky -- became a model for subsequent mainstream pianists to emulate.
musicstore.connect.com /artist/101/765/0/1017650.html   (557 words)

  
 HORACE SILVER: Retrospective (Blue Note)
Their first album, Horace Silver and the Jazz Messengers, was one of the true cornerstones in the development of hard bop.
Silver's next big hit came with "Senor Blues," appearing here in both instrumental and vocal versions.
Horace Silver took vintage RandB, bebop, gospel, blues and Caribbean elements and blended it into jazz.
www.thenightowl.com /reviews/hsilver.htm   (844 words)

  
 Jazz Pianist Horace Silver - Sound Clip - MSN Encarta
American jazz pianist, composer, and bandleader Horace Silver was one of the most important composers and pianists of the so-called hard bop style of the 1950s.
His compositions mixed elements of rhythm and blues and gospel into the driving, intense bebop sound that had been developed by musicians such as American saxophonist Charlie Parker and American trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie in the 1940s.
Silver’s piece “Song for my Father” (1965) has become a standard in the jazz repertoire.
encarta.msn.com /media_461524734/Jazz_Pianist_Horace_Silver.html   (130 words)

  
 Horace Silver Biography : Oldies.com
Silver studied piano and tenor saxophone at school, settling on the former instrument for his professional career.
By 1956 Silver was leading his own quintet, exploring the reaches of bop and becoming a founding father of the hard bop movement.
Silver's line-up - trumpet, tenor saxophone, piano, bass and drums - was subject to many changes over the years, but the calibre of musicians he hired was always very high.
www.oldies.com /artist-biography/Horace-Silver.html   (411 words)

  
 Horace Silver: The Hard Bop Homepage
By 1951 Silver had developed sufficient confidence to move to New York, where he performed as a freelance with such established professionals as Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Oscar Pettiford, and Art Blakey.
Silver's music was a major force in modern jazz on at least four counts.
Finally, Silver refined the art of composing and arranging for his chosen instrumentation to a level of craftsmanship as yet unsurpassed in jazz.
members.tripod.com /~hardbop/hsilver.html   (472 words)

  
 Horace Silver Review by Peter La Barbera   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
For a while in between Horace's music became more lyrical and social in content, which is not to say that the message was lost, but that familiar Silver identification was missing.
Horace had to come out on stage to apologize because the group was not ready or prepared to do any more charts for the night.
For all the old diehard Silver fans and the young jazz fans beginning to discover this music, this is a splendid sampling of hard bop as it sounds in the Nineties.
www.members.aol.com /plabjazz/horacesilver.html   (565 words)

  
 Horace Silver @ The Jazz Files
Horace Silver is a constant presence in the Jazz scene during the 50s and 60s.
Silver formed his own quintet which included Kenny Dorham on trumpet and Hank Mobley on tenor saxophone.
Silver is a typical exponent of the hard-bop movement and most of his quintet's recordings are on the Blue Note label.
www.thejazzfiles.com /JazzSilver.html   (276 words)

  
 Horace Silver - Impulse! Records
Silver, who is a master at getting a quintet sound that's spacious and full, liberally showcases these up-and-coming players, giving each ample room to step out and shine.
Silver's music reflects his roots, as well his openness to all types of music, embracing Broadway tunes, musicals, and classical music as much as jazz, rock, blues, and folk.
Silver feels strongly about his responsibility to pass on what he knows, acknowledging the value of the lessons he learned while developing his distinctive style and gaining confidence as a performer.
www.vervemusicgroup.com /artist.aspx?aid=2800   (1145 words)

  
 NPR's Jazz Profiles: Horace Silver
Horace Silver is widely regarded as the father of hard bop piano.
Horace switched from saxophone to piano and immersed himself in jazz, teaching himself to play and jamming frequently with his teenage friends.
Horace created signature compositional elements that would later be closely studied by both his contemporaries and those who followed in his footsteps.
www.npr.org /programs/jazzprofiles/archive/silver.html   (655 words)

  
 Biography - Horace Silver (Bio 175)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
From the perspective of the late '90s, it is clear that few jazz musicians have had a greater impact on the contemporary mainstream than Horace Silver.
Silver's earliest musical influence was the Cape Verdean folk music he heard from his Portugese-born father.
Silver's piano style — terse, imaginative, and utterly funky — became a model for subsequent mainstream pianists to emulate.
musicbase.h1.ru /PPB/ppb1/Bio_175.htm   (616 words)

  
 National Initiatives: NEA Jazz Masters - Horace Silver
Silver was exposed to music at an early age, hearing Cape Verde Islands folk music from his father.
Silver later used the island rhythms and flavor to great effect on his 1960s albums Song For My Father and Cape Verdean Blues.
Both Silver's band and the Jazz Messengers turned out to be proving grounds for a number of exceptional, aspiring musicians.
arts.endow.gov /national/jazz/masterbios/silver.html   (356 words)

  
 Horace Silver: Trio/Stylings of Silver/Finger Poppin'
Horace Silver is well known as the chief architect of the hard bop style, and his many quintets are legendary, but fewer people are familiar with his early work in the trio format.
He was able to combine the dynamics of a small bebop group with those of a big band, and his arrangements are often as interesting and exciting as charts written for much larger bands.
Silver’s compositional skills were still at their height here as well, with a variety of tunes and styles, from blues to loping swing to bebop barnburner.
www.jazzitude.com /bluenote_silverthree.htm   (596 words)

  
 The Horace Silver Discography: Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
With a pianistic and compositional style that draws from fl gospel, bebop, Latin and R&B sources, Horace Silver was one of the major musicians of the hard-bop and soul-jazz movements of the '50s and '60s.
Born in Norwalk, Conn., on Sept. 2, 1928, Silver grew up listening to the folk music of Cape Verde, as his father was from this Afro-Portuguese nation.
Silver worked with Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers in 1953, and the group's back-to-basics approach was the start of the hard-bop era.
afgen.com /silver.html   (225 words)

  
 Horace Silver   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
"Horace Ward Martin Tavares Silva" (born September 2 1928 in Norwalk, Connecticut) is an American jazz pianist and composer born to a Cape Verdean father (of mixed Portuguese-African descent) and a mother of Irish and African descent.
Silver was discovered in a Hartford, Connecticut club by saxophonist Stan Getz, with whom Silver made his recording debut.
Silver was the last musician to be signed to Blue Note in the 1970s before it went into temporary abeyance.
www.artistopia.com /horace-silver   (615 words)

  
 Horace Silver
Use the Booking Entertainment.com agency to book Horace Silver for your corporate event, private party, public concert, fundraiser, college, fair or festival.
Silver's piano style — terse, imaginative, and utterly funky — became a model for subsequent mainstream pianists to emulate.
Some of the most influential horn players of the '50s, '60s, and '70s first attained a measure of prominence with Silver — musicians like Donald Byrd, Woody Shaw, Joe Henderson, Benny Golson, and the Brecker Brothers all played in Silver's band at a point early in their careers.
onlinetalent.com /artist/jazz/Horace-Silver.php   (615 words)

  
 Horace Silver - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Horace Ward Martin Tavares Silver, born on September 2, 1928 in Norwalk, Connecticut) is a famous jazz pianist and composer born to a Cape Verdean father (of mixed Portuguese-fl descent) and a mother of Irish and African descent.
He is known for his distinctive humorous and funky playing style, and for his pioneering contributions to hard bop.
The drummer-pianist team lasted for four years; during this time, Silver and Blakey recorded at Birdland (A Night at Birdland, Blue Note) with Clifford Brown and Lou Donaldson, at the Bohemia with Kenny Dorham and Hank Mobley, and finally - in the studios.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Horace_Silver   (473 words)

  
 ASMAC - Horace Silver   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Horace Silver was born September 2nd, 1928 in Norwalk, Conn., and is a graduate of Norwalk High School.
Without national distribution, however, Silver had to fold his labels, but by the time his music was enjoying a resurgence, old masters and young lions alike revived his compositions.
Horace will soon release a new CD entitled Rockin' With Rachmaninoff.
www.asmac.org /HTML.PAGES/6.MEMBER_SPOTLIGHT/MEMBERS/silver_horace.html   (554 words)

  
 HORACE SILVER / RE-ENTRY
Always a force to be reckoned with, Silver's mid-60s band was consistently adventurous, original, and funky, anchored in the steady rhythms of bassist Larry Ridley and drummer Roger Humphries, and steeped in the passion of Joe Henderson's tenor sax.
Henderson and Silver both stretch exuberantly on the band's signature hit, "Song For My Father," which actually surpasses the studio version in sheer excitement.
Nevertheless, this recording features the Horace Silver Quintet playing near the peak of its powers, and is easily recommended.
www.musthear.com /reviews/reentry.html   (244 words)

  
 The Music Box: Horace Silver - Silver's Blue (Album Review)
In the span of just a few years, Horace Silver went from playing the role of a sideman for saxophonist Stan Getz to joining forces with Art Blakey to form the Jazz Messengers.
Nevertheless, the story behind Horace Silver’s relationship with both the group and Columbia Records is bit convoluted.
Indeed, throughout Silver’s Blue, the foundation for The Horace Silver Quintet was composed of saxophonist Hank Mobley, trumpeter Donald Byrd, and bass player Doug Watkins while Art Taylor — a veteran of both Coleman Hawkins and Bud Powell’s combos — replaced Blakey.
www.musicbox-online.com /hs-blue.html   (353 words)

  
 Blue Note Records
This is the seminal album that gave birth to the Blue Note Sound, to Art Blakey and The Jazz Messengers and to the Horace Silver Quintet.
As this was a record made early in comparison to the great jazz records of the late 50's and early 60's, I was a little hesitant in purchasing it.
Horace Silver is certainly a master when it comes to funky, bluesy hardbop.
www.bluenote.com /detail.asp?SelectionID=10401   (340 words)

  
 The History of Jazz Music. Horace Silver: biography, discography, review, links
Horace Silver (1928) was the main hard-bop pianist, influenced by both African and gospel music.
Then he launched is own quintet of piano, trumpet, tenor saxophone, bass and drums, to concentrate on what he liked: a bluesy piano style and a sound that borrowed as much from rhythm'n'blues as from jazz.
The foundations of the line-up of Silver's Blue (july 1956) was the Jazz Messengers without Blakey, jamming fluently in Shootin' Out and Silver's Blue.
www.scaruffi.com /jazz/silver.html   (437 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Finger Poppin' With the Horace Silver Quintet: Books: Horace Silver   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
This was the first record cut by Silver's famous Blue Mitchell/Junior Cook quintet.
It features 8 originals from Horace, which probably aren't his most memorable compositions but are excellent vehicles for showcasing the band.
Young Louis Hayes is a loud, flashy drummer somewhat similar to Philly Joe Jones, and Silver is in a swaggering mood with his lightning-fast, funky piano riffs.
www.amazon.ca /Finger-Poppin-Horace-Silver/dp/B00007KMNQ   (321 words)

  
 Horace Silver - Rockin' With Rachmaninoff   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
The concept of the album is based on a dream of Silver’s in which Duke Ellington and Rachmaninoff meet in heaven.
Silver's earliest musical influence was the Cape Verdean folk music he heard from his Portugese-born father.
Silver’s enduring legend and continual creative pursuit of new of new music are the drive behind his career.
www.bopcity.com /horacesilver.htm   (561 words)

  
 Horace Silver
Horace Silver: Retrospective - CD Review from All About Jazz, a magazine for Jazz fans by Jazz fans.
Horace Silver: Retrospective (Blue Note) - Review: by Steve Marshall.
Horace Silver Tribute and Discography - A tribute to the "Hard-Bop Grandpop".
www.hotguitarist.com /bands/S/silver_horace.htm   (139 words)

  
 Horace Silver
Although Silver’s "classic" quintet — which featured Blue Mitchell and Junior Cook and lasted from ’58 to ’64 — represents his most consistent output, there are many additional bright moments.
Silver’s other efforts as a lyricist are only a slight improvement.
Truthfully, Silver’s last leg at Blue Note pales in comparison to his earlier periods, and it’s unfortunate that, despite some beautiful solos by Tom Harrell, the fourth and final disc of this set fails to meet the Silver standard.
www.citypaper.net /articles/091699/mus.dq2.shtml   (436 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.