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Topic: House of Lords Act 1999


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  House of Lords Act 1999 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Acts of Parliament of the Kingdom of England to 1659
Acts of Parliament of the Kingdom of Scotland
Acts of Parliament of the Kingdom of Ireland
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/House_of_Lords_Act_1999   (1683 words)

  
 House of Lords - WikiGadugi   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The Lord Chancellor was not only the Speaker of the House of Lords, but also a member of the Cabinet; his or her department, formerly the Lord Chancellor's Department, is now called the Department for Constitutional Affairs.
In addition, the Lord Chancellor is the head of the judiciary of England and Wales, serving as the president of the Supreme Court of England and Wales.
The jurisdiction of the House of Lords extends, in civil and in criminal cases, to appeals from the courts of England and Wales, and of Northern Ireland.
en.wikigadugi.org /wiki/House_of_Lords   (7453 words)

  
 House Of Lords Act 1999
The Act does not affect the rights of holders of a hereditary peerage excluded from the House of Lords to keep all the other titles, rights, offices, privileges and precedents attaching to the peerage which are unconnected with membership of the House of Lords.
The House of Lords Act does not remove the right to disclaim, but it repeals the references in section 1(2) to writs of summons, as a hereditary peer will no longer by virtue of being a hereditary peer be entitled to receive a writ of summons unless he is an excepted peer.
One of the effects of section 3(2) of the 1963 Act is to prohibit the issue of a writ in acceleration to the person entitled to succeed to a disclaimed hereditary peerage on the death of its present holder.
www.opsi.gov.uk /acts/en1999/1999en34.htm   (3010 words)

  
 Thompson, 'Future Imperfect: Reform of the House of Lords', [2000] 4 Web JCLI
With the coming into effect of the House of Lords Act 1999, the House of Lords is a transitional chamber between the old house whose membership was mainly hereditary peers (750 out of a total 1,295 as at 4 January 1999 - White Paper 1999, para 3.3) and the reformed second chamber.
Bingham, Lord (2000) `Reform of the House of Lords: Future of the Appellate Committee' Evidence to the Royal Commission on the Reform of the House of Lords at 0022.pdf in the CD-Rom which accompanies Wakeham 2000.
Lester, Lord (2000) `A Proposal Concerning the Parliamentary Scrutiny of Non-EU treaties' Evidence to the Royal Commission on the Reform of the House of Lords at 0090.pdf in the CD-Rom which accompanies Wakeham 2000.
webjcli.ncl.ac.uk /2000/issue4/thompson4.html   (7305 words)

  
 [No title]
HOUSE OF LORDS ACT 1999 $$T House of Lords Act 1999 1999 Chapter 34 © Crown Copyright 1999 All Crown copyrights are reserved.
House of Lords Act 1999 1999 Chapter 34 ARRANGEMENT OF SECTIONS Section S CHEDULES: - - An Act to restrict membership of the House of Lords by virtue of a hereditary peerage; to make related provision about disqualifications for voting at elections to, and for membership of, the House of Commons; and for connected purposes.
In section 1(2) of the Peerage Act 1963 (disclaimer of certain hereditary peerages) for the words from "has" to the end there shall be substituted the words "is excepted from section 1 of the House of Lords Act 1999 by virtue of section 2 of that Act".
bar.austlii.edu.au /~andrew/test/hola1999166.txt   (856 words)

  
 UK Parliament - lords   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The House of Lords is also the final court of appeal for civil cases in the United Kingdom and for criminal cases in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.
All other members of the House of Lords are unpaid, but they are entitled to reimbursement of their expenses, within maximum limits for each day on which they attend the House.
Members of the House of Lords are not elected and, with the exception of bishops who leave the House on retirement, they retain their seats for life.
www.parliament.uk /works/lords.cfm   (1125 words)

  
 House of Lords - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The House of Lords does not have a fixed number of members: currently there are 751 members, consisting of 26 "Lords Spiritual" and 725 "Lords Temporal".
The Lords Spiritual are the two archbishops and 24 most senior bishops of the Church of England, while the Lords Temporal are 633 current Life Peers, the 90 Hereditary Peers and the two Great Officers of State.
It is understood that the Law Lords are "resistant" and have yet to formally decide on a new location, away from the Houses of Parliament : their present offices are "most agreeable", it seems, while possible new offices nearby in a re-modelled listed neo-Gothic Middlesex Guildhall are being considered.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/House_of_Lords   (7492 words)

  
 House of Lords Elections
Under the provisions of the House of Lords Act 1999, there are to be 92 hereditary peers who will be Lords of Parliament in subsequent sessions.
Lord Belstead (C) Lord Carrington (C) Viscount Cranborne (Lord Cecil of Essendon) (C) [on Leave of Absence from the House since 1st November 2001; he succeeded to the Marquessate of Salisbury in 2003]
Lord Windlesham (C) In addition, the Earl of Crawford and Balcarres holds a life peerage conferred before he inherited the hereditary title.
www.election.demon.co.uk /lords.html   (790 words)

  
 House of Lords Act 1999
An Act to restrict membership of the House of Lords by virtue of a hereditary peerage; to make related provision about disqualifications for voting at elections to, and for membership of, the House of Commons; and for connected purposes.
In this Act "hereditary peerage" includes the principality of Wales and the earldom of Chester.
This Act may be cited as the House of Lords Act 1999.
www.hereditarytitles.com /Page39.html   (774 words)

  
 LLRX -- UK Constitutional Reform
Acts including fixing the duration of Parliament, and defining the relations between the houses of Lords and Commons.
Similarly, because the Lord Chancellor and Lords of Appeal in Ordinary (who constitute the Appellate Committee of the House of Lords — the law lords) also sit in the House of Lords, which is part of the legislature, their decisions cannot be seen to be politically impartial.
Lord Irvine of Lairg, The Lord Chancellor, 1998.
www.llrx.com /features/ukconstitution.htm   (8985 words)

  
 House of Lords Byelection
House of Lords Act: Hereditary Peers Byelection, March 2003
As the Viscount of Oxfuird had been one of the 15 peers elected by the whole House as office-holders, the electorate was the whole House of Lords.
This included the hereditary peers elected under the House of Lords Act 1999, but not including peers on leave of absence or those who had not taken the oath.
www.election.demon.co.uk /lordsbe.html   (279 words)

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