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Topic: Hydrogen sulfide


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In the News (Wed 22 May 19)

  
  Hydrogen sulfide - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Hydrogen sulfide is corrosive and penetrates the lattice of some steels and makes them brittle, leading to sulphide stress cracking - a concern especially for handling acid gas and sour crude in the oil industry.
Metal sulfides should not to be confused with sulfites, which are derived from the sulfite ion SO Hydrogen sulfide burns to give the gas sulfur dioxide, which is more familiar to people as the odor of a burnt match.
Hydrogen sulfide is a central participant in the sulfur cycle, the biogeochemical cycle of sulfur on Earth.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Hydrogen_sulfide   (2004 words)

  
 ATSDR - ToxFAQs™: Hydrogen Sulfide
Hydrogen sulfide is released primarily as a gas and spreads in the air.
Hydrogen sulfide has not been shown to cause cancer in humans, and its possible ability to cause cancer in animals has not been studied thoroughly.
Hydrogen sulfide can be measured in exhaled air, but samples must be taken within 2 hours after exposure to be useful.
www.atsdr.cdc.gov /tfacts114.html   (1146 words)

  
 Hydrogen Sulfide Chemical Information Sheet
Hydrogen sulfide is a colorless gas with a rotten-egg odor.
Hydrogen sulfide exposure is assumed in these studies based on job title, work history or living near facilities emitting hydrogen sulfide.
The main effects of short-term and long-term hydrogen sulfide exposure in laboratory animals are nasal and lung irritation and damage and effects on the brain.
www.health.state.ny.us /nysdoh/environ/btsa/sulfide.htm   (789 words)

  
 ATSDR - MMG: Hydrogen Sulfide
Hydrogen sulfide is produced naturally by decaying organic matter and is released from sewage sludge, liquid manure, sulfur hot springs, and natural gas.
Hydrogen sulfide is used to produce elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid, and heavy water for nuclear reactors.
Hydrogen sulfide poisoning is not known to pose additional risk during the use of bronchial or cardiac sensitizing agents.
www.atsdr.cdc.gov /MHMI/mmg114.html   (4547 words)

  
 Hydrogen sulfide (EHC 19, 1981)
Hydrogen sulfide is a flammable colourless gas with the characteristic odour of rotten eggs.
One gram of hydrogen sulfide dissolves in 187 ml of water at 10°C, in 242 ml of water at 20°C, in 314 ml of water at 30°C, and in 405 ml of water at 40°C (calculated from Weast, 1977-78).
The analyser is calibrated using hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl sulfide permeation tubes, and a dual-flow gas dilution device capable of producing reference standard atmospheres as low as the limits of detection of the method.
www.inchem.org /documents/ehc/ehc/ehc019.htm   (14328 words)

  
 Hydrogen Sulfide (Cicads 53, 2003)
Hydrogen sulfide may be produced by a variety of commercial methods, including reacting dilute sulfuric acid with iron sulfite, heating hydrogen and sulfur into their vapour phase, and heating sulfur with paraffin.
Hydrogen sulfide levels of 0.92 µg/g in blood, 1.06 µg/g in brain, 0.34 µg/g in kidney, and 0.38 µg/g in liver were detected at autopsy in a man who was overcome by hydrogen sulfide after working for 5 min in a tank (Winek et al., 1968).
Hydrogen sulfide is excreted primarily as sulfate (free sulfate or thiosulfate) in the urine.
www.inchem.org /documents/cicads/cicads/cicad53.htm   (16435 words)

  
 Hydrogen Sulfide in Drinking Water, AEX-319-97
Water supplies with as little as 1.0 ppm (part per million) hydrogen sulfide are corrosive, may tarnish copper and silverware, and occasionally release a fl material that stains laundry and porcelain.
Hydrogen sulfide is formed by sulfur bacteria that may occur naturally in water.
The hydrogen sulfide is adsorbed onto the surface of the carbon particles.
ohioline.osu.edu /aex-fact/0319.html   (909 words)

  
 hydrogen sulfide. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Hydrogen sulfide is flammable; in an excess of air it burns to form sulfur dioxide and water, but if not enough oxygen is present, it forms elemental sulfur and water.
Hydrogen sulfide is found naturally in volcanic gases and in some mineral waters.
Hydrogen sulfide reacts with most metal ions to form sulfides; the sulfides of some metals are insoluble in water and have characteristic colors that help to identify the metal during chemical analysis.
www.bartleby.com /65/hy/hydrogn-su.html   (260 words)

  
 Hydrogen Sulfide Gas
Hydrogen sulfide gas is also known as “sewer gas”; because it is often produced by the breakdown of waste material.
Hydrogen sulfide is a colorless, flammable gas under normal conditions.
In homes where hydrogen sulfide gas is present, you can reduce the level of the gas by locating and eliminating the source.
www.idph.state.il.us /envhealth/factsheets/hydrogensulfide.htm   (505 words)

  
 Hydrogen Sulfide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Hydrogen sulfide is released primarily as a gas and will spread in the air.
A small amount of hydrogen sulfide is produced by bacteria in your mouth and gastrointestinal tract and by enzymes in your brain and muscle.
Because it is heavier than air, hydrogen sulfide tends to sink, and because children are shorter than adults, they may be more likely to be exposed to larger amounts than adults in the same situations.
www.altcorp.com /AffinityLaboratory/h2stoxicity.htm   (4984 words)

  
 Hydrogen Sulfide Kills
Hydrogen sulfide is generated in the flow when sewage is allowed to stand for long period and become stagnant or septic.
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas is normally heavier than air, but when agitated, it can erupt from the confines of the pipe in levels of toxicity which paralyze the lungs.
As the flows converged, deadly hydrogen sulfide gas was forced from the manhole into the atmosphere, enveloping Horatio in a "mushroom cloud" of lethal gas.
www.swopnet.com /engr/Gayman/Gayman_H2S.html   (1520 words)

  
 hydrogen sulfide (H2S): What you need to know
Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) is a colorless gas that smells like rotten eggs (from the sulphur).
Usually, the poisoning caused by hydrogen sulfide is though inhalation and has a toxicity similar to cyanide.
At high levels, hydrogen sulfide gas may paralyze the lungs, meaning that the victim may then be unable to escape from the toxic gas without assistance.
www.h2ssafety.com /hydrogen_sulfide.htm   (474 words)

  
 Toxicology of Hydrogen Sulfide
Hydrogen sulfide is oxidized by photochemically-generated free radicals, especially hydroxy radicals.
The exposure to reduced-sulfur gases, predominantly hydrogen sulfide, was considered the most plausible explanation of the neurotoxic effects in this study.
This is a report on a 20-month old infant exposed for a year to 0.6 ppm hydrogen sulfide downwind from a burning tip gas ignition point for a colliery.
www.drthrasher.org /toxicology_of_hydrogen_sulfide.html   (1451 words)

  
 Hydrogen sulfide
Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely hazardous gas which can be immediately life threatening at high concentrations (300 mg/cu m or 200 ppm).
Hydrogen sulfide is rapidly oxidized and may ignite in contact with a range of metal oxides, including barium peroxide,...
Hydrogen sulfide may readily cause pipes and valves to corrode or become brittle, lines and fittings likely to contain hydrogen sulfide should be inspected frequently and receive special attention, monitoring, and maintenance to prevent leaks.
www.gasdetection.com /TECH/h2s.html   (11417 words)

  
 Hydrogen sulfide (CASRN 7783-06-4), IRIS, Environmental Protection Agency
Certain circumstantial data suggests that children may be more susceptible than adults to the acute effects of hydrogen sulfide under high level exposures.
Relevancy to humans of the olfactory lesions seen in rodents to human is suggested by Hirsch and Zavala (1999) who report decreased persistent olfactory function in workers exposed chronically to hydrogen sulfide.
Source Document -- Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Sulfide (U.S. This assessment was peer reviewed by scientists external to the U.S. Their comments have been evaluated carefully and incorporated in finalization of this IRIS summary.
www.epa.gov /IRIS/subst/0061.htm   (3929 words)

  
 Technorati Tag: hydrogen
If the developers behind H2PIA have their way, a hydrogen future may not be as far off as some predict.
George Monbiot April 28th, 2006 advocates large-scale hydrogen use in Britain for heating purposes in a recent article in the Guardian.
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www.technorati.com /tag/hydrogen   (506 words)

  
 Arizona Instrument - Jerome 631 Hydrogen Sulfide Analyzer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The sensor's selectivity to hydrogen sulfide eliminates interferences from sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and water vapors.
Any hydrogen sulfide in the sample is adsorbed by the sensor which registers a proportional change in electrical resistance.
The hydrogen sulfide concentration is displayed on the LCD, where it remains until the next sample is taken.
www.azic.com /products_631.aspx   (495 words)

  
 Documentation for Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health Concentrations (IDLHs)
Other human data: It has been reported that 170 to 300 ppm is the maximum concentration that can be endured for 1 hour without serious consequences [Henderson and Haggard 1943] and that olfactory fatigue occurs at 100 ppm [Poda 1966].
Basis for revised IDLH: The revised IDLH for hydrogen sulfide is 100 ppm based on acute inhalation toxicity data in humans [Henderson and Haggard 1943; Poda 1966; Yant 1930] and animals [Back et al.
Hydrogen sulfide in industry: occurrence, effects and treatment.
www.cdc.gov /niosh/idlh/7783064.html   (389 words)

  
 hydrogen sulfide
Hydrogen sulfide also reacts directly with silver metal, forming a dull, gray-fl tarnish of silver sulfide (Ag The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia,
hydrosulfuric acid - hydrosulfuric acid: see hydrogen sulfide.
sulfide - sulfide, chemical compound containing sulfur and one other element or sulfur and a radical.
www.factmonster.com /ce6/sci/A0824725.html   (297 words)

  
 Hydrogen Sulfide
For an explanation of terms: Glossary of Gas Detecting Terms
Hydrogen Sulfide is a colorless, very flammable gas.
In low concentrations it smells like "rotten eggs" however the sense of smell is lost after 2-15 minutes of exposure making it impossible to smell dangerous concentrations.
www.amgas.com /h2s.htm   (188 words)

  
 Safety (MSDS) data for hydrogen sulfide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Click here for data on hydrogen sulfide in student-friendly format, from the HSci project
Synonyms: hydrogen sulphide, hepatic acid, sewer gas, sulfur hydride, dihydrogen monosulfide, dihydrogen monosulphide, sulphur hydride, stink damp, sulfureted hydrogen
We have not verified this information, and cannot guarantee that it is up-to-date.
physchem.ox.ac.uk /MSDS/HY/hydrogen_sulfide.html   (242 words)

  
 eMedicine - Toxicity, Hydrogen Sulfide : Article by Sujal Mandavia, MD, FRCP(C), FACEP   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
S has a much greater affinity for methemoglobin than for cellular cytochromes, leading to lower metabolic toxicity.
Medicine is a constantly changing science and not all therapies are clearly established.
In particular, all drug doses, indications, and contraindications should be confirmed in the package insert.
www.emedicine.com /EMERG/topic258.htm   (1355 words)

  
 Hydrogen Sulfide
Question.com > Encyclopedia > Science and Technology > Chemistry > Compounds and Elements > Hydrogen Sulfide
7182 brand seals offer outstanding resistance to high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, H2S, or sour gas, including hot applications.
Hydrogen sulfide also reacts directly with silver metal, forming a dull, gray-fl tarnish of silver sulfide (Ag Related Sites and Content
www.question.com /link/hydrogn-su.html   (348 words)

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