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Topic: Hyphenated American


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  Hyphenated American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The term hyphenated American is an epithet from the late 19th century to refer to Americans who consider themselves of a distinct cultural origin other than the United States, and who claim to hold allegiance to both.
By contrast other groups have embraced the hyphen arguing that the American identity is compatible with alternative identities and that the mixture of identities within the United States strengthens the nation rather than weakens it.
The term "hyphenated American" was popularized in the 1910s by President Theodore Roosevelt, responding to the increasing fractionalization within the nation along ethnic lines.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Hyphenated_American   (836 words)

  
 § 38. hyphenated Americans. 6. Names and Labels. The American Heritage Book of English Usage. 1996
Naturalized immigrants to the United States and their descendants are sometimes referred to as hyphenated Americans, a term that dates to the end of the 19th century and that reflects an earlier tendency in American English to hyphenate such forms as Irish-American, German-American, and Mexican-American both as nouns and as adjectives.
Contemporary usage frowns on hyphenating these constructions, especially when used as nouns; thus, The new mayor is an Asian American; she is the first Asian-American (or Asian American) mayor in the city’s history.
In the case of Native American, neither the noun nor the adjective is usually hyphenated.
www.bartleby.com /64/C006/038.html   (212 words)

  
 Hyphenated American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Hyphenated Americans are Americans who are referred to with a first word indicating an origin or ancestry in a foreign country and a second term (separated from the first with a hyphen) being "American" (e.g., Japanese-American, Afghan-American, African-American).
The construction is meant to suggest that these individuals straddle two worlds—one experience is specific to their unique ethnic identity, while the other is the broader multicultural amalgam that is Americana.
They argue that the hyphen denotes dual nationalism (and implies inability to be accepted as truly American) while the non-hyphenated form uses their ancestral origin as an adjective for "American."
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Hyphenated_American   (231 words)

  
 Hispanic Business Forums - Theodore Roosevelt on hyphenated Americans.
Americanism is a matter of the spirit and of the soul.
The man who calls himself an American citizen and who yet shows by his actions that he is primarily the citizen of a foreign land, plays a thoroughly mischievous part in the life of our body politic.
That by itself promotes the idea of hyphenated Americans and this existed waaaay before the Hispanic community was even a blip on the radar.
www.hispanicbusiness.com /forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1976   (633 words)

  
 Theodore Roosevelt Advocates Americanism
For an American citizen to vote as a German-American, an Irish-American, or an English-American, is to be a traitor to American institutions; and those hyphenated Americans who terrorize American politicians by threats of the foreign vote are engaged in treason to the American Republic.
It must be maintained on an American standard of living so as to prevent labor disturbances in important plants and at critical times.
We cannot afford to leave American mines, munitions plants, and general resources in the hands of alien workmen, alien to America and even likely to be made hostile to America by machinations such as have recently been provided in the case of the two foreign embassies in Washington.
rpatrick.com /USA/americanism   (1138 words)

  
 Hyphenated American   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Hyphenated Americans are Americans who are referred to with a word indicating an origin or ancestry in foreign country and a second term (separated the first with a hyphen) being "American" (e.g.
By contrast other groups have embraced the arguing that the American identity is compatible alternative identities and that the mixture of within the United States strengthens the nation than weakens it.
Hyphenated Catholicism: A Study of the Role of the Polish-American Model of Church, 1890-1908
www.freeglossary.com /Hyphenated-American   (402 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Hyphenated American   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
A hyphen (-, or ‐) is a punctuation mark.
An African-American (also Afro-American, Black American, or fl), is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa.
The term hyphenated American is an epithet from the late 19th century to refer to Americans who consider themselves of a distinct cultural origin other the United States, and who claims to hold allegiance to both.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Hyphenated-American   (902 words)

  
 Hyphenated American   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
'''Hyphenated Americans''' are Americans who are referred to with a first word indicating an origin or ancestry in a foreign country and a second term (separated from the first with a hyphen) being "American" (e.g., African American, Japanese American).
European American, as opposed to White, Caucasian, or Non-hispanic White, was coined in response to the increasing racial diversity of the US, as well as to this diversity moving more into the mainstream of the society in the latter half of the 20th century.
The term is meant to discourage a dichotomous view of the racial landscape, in which "Whites" are conceived as separate from the rest of the racial groups, which have hyphenated terms denoting ancestry.
hyphenated-american.area51.ipupdater.com   (298 words)

  
 America's Debate -> Assimilation
Surely rural Americans in the western states (exclude the bigger cities on the west coast) are not anywhere near assimilated to the culture as might be seen in the larger eastern cities.
America is founded on its citizens and their beliefs; as fairly small cultures and groups of people come to America and conform to the general constraints of our country, America as a whole begins to assimilate to broad foundation, its citizens.
European Americans don't call themselves European Americans because they are the majority and don't have the same need to find that "common ground" because they are represented everywhere.
www.americasdebate.com /forums/index.php?showtopic=3113   (2671 words)

  
 Modernity Continues (Walker instructed by Native American Wisdom)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Native Americans envision an alternative to continuing with modernity.
Native American visions of an alternative future are visions of both Native American and hyphenated-American peoples in a genuinely post modern world where righteous tribal values and rightly tribal religions are embraced in creative new ways.
Here solidarity means solidarity with rightly tribal and indigenous peoples, including especially Native American peoples, for the purpose of contributing to the creation of a more favorable alternative future, a future yielding a more prosperous existence for all life, including human and other than human life.
faculty.smu.edu /twalker/mdrnty4.htm   (677 words)

  
 On The Third Hand : Strange…
Americans were by default mostly of English descent, and the common thought of the day excluded other immigrants, and slaves, from the calulations of who was American.
I suspect that the rise of the mindset behind hyphenation coincided with the rise of ethnic voting blocs in the late 19th century, such as Boss Tweed’s machine in New York.
The push-pull between nativists and immigrant groups created unity among immigrant communities, heightened their senses of both and led to the hyphenated labels we have today, or at least the right mindset.
site-essential.com /archive/2004/02/16/3593.php   (629 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Mexican American   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Mexican Americans account for 64% of the Hispanic or Latino population of the United States.
Chicanismo is a cultural movement by Mexican Americans to recapture their Mexican, Native American culture, which began in the 1930s in the Southwest United States.
The proximity of the two countries, a continuous influx of new arrivals, concentration in predominantly Mexican barrios and colonias and Spanish-language media enable Mexican Americans to maintain ties with relatives in Mexico and the Spanish language to a degree not possible for other immigrant groups with their respective countries of origin and native tongues.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Mexican-American   (1847 words)

  
 Lone Star Times » No, no, no — hyphenation is still a bad idea
The plan to adopt the American practice of identifying ethnic heritage will be controversial with some British ethnic minorities likely to claim that it is racist.
The problem, of course, is that hyphenating was never really viewed as a way of highlighting an ethnicity’s American roots in this country.
Even stranger than using hyphenated ethnicity terms is the fact that the British government has to officially change these terms.
lonestartimes.com /index.php?p=1315   (789 words)

  
 The Hyphenated American — www.greenwood.com
Both individual and marital conflicts are analyzed to highlight the impact of one's cultural heritage on adjustments to mainstream American society.
This book is designed to provide therapists with important insights in treating "hyphenated Americans," who are the grandchildren (third generation) of the original immigrants.
Kluckhohn's theory of variations in orientation is employed to examine the culture change that children and grandchildren of immigrants undergo in interfacing with American society.
www.greenwood.com /books/bookdetail.asp?sku=GM0930   (413 words)

  
 America's Debate -> Hyphenated Americans
I mentioned subject of "hyphenated Americans" in another thread and it was suggested that this might be an interesting topic to discuss.
For Americans of European descent, even though many of our ancestors were persecuted or brought here as indentured servants, there was no immediate, violent, purposeful erasing of culture.
The less Americans have in common with each other, the less they can even communicate with each other, the more they accent their differences which are now becoming numerous, the more they are at each others throats, the more likely they are to keep their nose out of my business and the world's business.
www.americasdebate.com /forums/index.php?showtopic=927   (4225 words)

  
 About the Editor   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
To be an American was foremost in the mind of the immigrant.
As an American of Mexican decent, I was born in America, and I was taught and believe George Washington was a hero for me as an American.
Is it they thought becoming an American was the most important thing in their life, important enough to leave their country in favor of the land of freedom.
www.suanews.com /abouteditor.html   (1795 words)

  
 hyphenated. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition.
Naturalized immigrants to the United States and their descendants have sometimes been termed hyphenated Americans in reference to the tendency to hyphenate such ethnic compounds as Irish-American and Polish-American.
This term has come under strong criticism as suggesting that those so designated are not as fully American as “unhyphenated” citizens, and it is best avoided in all but historical contexts.
www.bartleby.com /61/21/H0362150.html   (137 words)

  
 Daneen G. Peterson, Ph.D.: Why I am NOT a Hyphenated-American   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Americans have no need for such 'excess baggage' of expanding on their national origins and wouldn't consider it even if it was supposed to express their 'ancestral designation' as Mr.
Most Americans consider it superfluous and unnecessary to adopt a description that expands on something we are proud to be identified as, and admired for being.
Hyphenation is simply another manifestation of diversity that will rent asunder our unique American culture that has become a model for assimilation and acculturation by disparate peoples, admired and applauded around the world.
www.michnews.com /artman/publish/article_9501.shtml   (1447 words)

  
 Hyphenated American   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Hyphenated Americans are Americans who are referredto with a first word indicating an origin or ancestry in a foreign country and a second term (separated from the first with a hyphen) being "American" (e.g., Japanese-American, Afghan-American, African-American).
The construction is meant to suggest that theseindividuals straddle two worlds—one experience is specific to their unique ethnic identity, while the other is the broadermulticultural amalgam that is Americana.
By contrast other groups have embraced the hyphen arguing that the American identity is compatible with alternative identitiesand that the mixture of identities within the United States strengthens the nation rather than weakens it.
www.therfcc.org /hyphenated-american-6837.html   (213 words)

  
 Hyphen at opensource encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Without the hyphens, there is potential confusion about whether "light" applies to "blue" or "paint", whether "twentieth" applies to "century" or "invention", etc. Hyphens are generally not used in noun-noun or adverb-adjective compound modifiers, for example:
Hyphens are also used to denote syllabification, as in syl-lab-i-fi-ca-tion.
However, the use of hyphens has in general been steadily declining, both in popular writing and in scholarly journals.
www.wiki.tatet.com /en/Hyphen.html   (525 words)

  
 Carolina Morning News on the Web | Opinion - No such thing as a hyphenated American 07/04/00
He wrote, "The notion of a hyphenated American is un-American.
Some fellow Americans come to mind in support of eliminating hyphenating ourselves: Kristie Yamaguchi's name and lovely face need no explanation as to her heritage; the fact that she won an Olympic medal figure skating for the United States says it all -- she's All-American.
A wonderful argument for ending the division of Americans was in an old Barney Miller TV show.
www.lowcountrynow.com /stories/070400/OPEDvoices.shtml   (432 words)

  
 Definition of hyphen
10:...ntieth' applies to 'century' or 'invention', etc. Hyphens are generally ''not'' used in noun-noun or adver...
Hyphenated techniques are widely used in [[chemistry]] a...
12:...m, (abbreviated '''k.k.''' or '''k-k''') with the hyphen connecting the terms and implying an indifferent...
www.wordiq.com /search/hyphen.html   (409 words)

  
 OpinionJournal - Wonder Land Responses
I know a lot of Americans of Chinese descent who have chosen to stick to the old ways, and that is their choice.
African-Americans were the first hyphenated Americans, and they have no ethnicity, since they lost their ethnicity when the crossed the Atlantic in chains.
Hyphenation has only helped those who want the rest of us to become distinctly separated by our ethnicity to their benefit.
www.opinionjournal.com /columnists/dhenninger/responses.html?article_id=110002308   (4233 words)

  
 McGreevey Nationality Title Invalid   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
When New-Jersey Governor James E. McGreevey announced that he was a homosexual, he did so in a manner and under circumstances which unwittingly fueled the debate over hyphenated Americanism and immeasurably aided the cause of singular nationality.
Most Americans, who regard their nationality as awesome, lofty and exclusive, do not include sex-perverts, criminals or lunatics within their ranks, neither do they countenance incompatible minorities or illegal aliens.
Finally, McGreevey is not an American, because he has forfeited that designation by sullying home, family and marriage and so degrading American citizenship, that most-esteemed of emoluments ever created among earthly estates.
www.nationalist.org /alt/2004/mcgreevey.html   (818 words)

  
 Theodore Roosevelt Advocates Americanism, 1915   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Irish and German Americans were vocal in their opposition to America joining the Allies.
So he attacked the concept of hyphenated Americans as those who felt America should make policy decisions based on how they would help or hurt their homeland.
Now we think of the idea of hyphenated Americans in terms of people demanding separation and special treatment for their culture.
www.freerepublic.com /focus/f-news/1465317/posts   (1531 words)

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