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Topic: Ibn Batuta


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  Ibn Batuta - Wikipedia
Abu Abdullah Mohammed ibn Batuta ook Ibn Battuta (1304 – 1368 /1369) was een Amazigh reiziger, afkomstig uit Tanger in het huidige Marokko.
In 1352-1354 maakte Ibn Batuta zijn laatste reis.
Ibn Batuta liet zijn reizen optekenen in een boek dat Rihla (Reizen) heet.
nl.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ibn_Battoeta   (873 words)

  
 Ibn Battuta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Abu Abdullah Muhammad ibn Battuta (February 24, 1304 to 1368 to 1377, year of death uncertain) was born in Tangier, Morocco during the time of Merinid Sultanate rule in the Islamic calendar year 703, into a Berber family.
Alfonso XI of Castile was threatening the conquest of Gibraltar, and Ibn Battuta joined up with a group of Muslims leaving Tangier with the intention of defending the port.
While Ibn Battuta never mentions this specifically, hearing of this during his own trip must have planted a seed in his mind, for he decided to set out and visit the Muslim kingdom on the far side of the Sahara Desert.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ibn_Batuta   (2474 words)

  
 the a la menthe: A Distant Mirror   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Ibn Batuta's tale of his travels first to Mecca and then to the exotic East, with a brief coda on his voyage to Mali, provides a glimpse into a world far removed from most of our experience.
Ibn Batuta encounters a number of Sufis and other Islamic holy men along his route, and even withdraws from the world and embraces an ascetic life at one point until he is once again seduced by the pleasures of the court.
Ibn Batuta was by birth a shaikh and by training a qadi, or Islamic judge, and various sultans appoint him to judgeships in the course of his travels.
www.williamsonday.com /archives/maghreb/000426.html   (620 words)

  
 Ibn Batuta. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
He made a journey by way of Samarkand to India, where he resided for almost eight years at the court of the sultan of Delhi, who sent him to China as one of his ambassadors.
Ibn Batuta visited the Maldives, the Malabar coast, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), and Sumatra.
Batuta is still considered a most reliable source for the geography of his period and an authority on the cultural and social history of Islam.
www.bartleby.com /65/ib/IbnBatut.html   (210 words)

  
 Ibn Battuta : Ibn Batuta
Crossing the Black Sea, Ibn Battuta landed in Kaffa[?], in the Crimea, and entered the lands of the Golden Horde.
The Sultan was erratic even by the standards of the time, and Ibn Battuta veered between living the high life of a trusted subordinate, and being under suspicion for a variety of reasons.
At the instigation of the Sultan, Ibn Battuta dictated an account of his journeys to a scholar named Ibn Juzayy[?], whom he had met while in Iberia.
www.fastload.org /ib/Ibn_Batuta.html   (2134 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Ibn Battuta Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
At the instigation of the Sultan of Morocco, Ibn Battuta dictated an acco...
At the instigation of the Sultan of Morocco, Ibn Battuta dictated an account of his journeys to a scholar named Ibn Juzayy, whom he had met while in Iberia.
Tuguluq was erratic even by the standards of the time, and Ibn Battuta veered between living the high life of a trusted subordinate, and being under suspicion for a variety of reasons.
www.ipedia.com /ibn_battuta.html   (2188 words)

  
 ibn batuta
Dennoch begegnete Ibn Batuta in der Stadt Makdasbu einem gewissen Luxus, um nicht zu sagen einem wohltuenden Komfort, an den er sich immer gern erinnert.
Ibn Batuta wurde dabei von seinen Leuten getrennt, gefangen genommen, beraubt, gefesselt und weggeschleppt.
Ibn Batuta spricht auch von großen bärtigen Affen, "welche einen großen Teil der Bevölkerung der Insel ausmachen", die eine monarchische Regierung besitzt, mit einem kynocephalischen, mit Baumblättern gekrönten Könige an der Spitze.
www.jadu.de /mittelalter/arabien/batuta/batuta.html   (2563 words)

  
 Ibn Batuta
The mission party was to embark in Chinese junks (the word used) and smaller vessels, but that carrying the other envoys and the presents, which started before Ibn Batuta was ready, was wrecked totally; the vessel that he had engaged went off with his property, and he was left on the beach of Calicut.
Ibn Batuta's travels have only been known in Europe during the 19th century; at first merely by Arabic abridgments in the Gotha and Cambridge libraries.
Ibn Batuta's statements and anecdotes regarding the showy virtues and solid vices of Sultan Muhammad Tughlak are in entire agreement with Indian historians, and add many fresh details.
www.ermeland.de /batuta.htm   (1450 words)

  
 Medieval Sourcebook: Ibn Battuta: Travels in Asia and Africa 1325-1354
The fourth of them, as she passed, saw the tent on top of the hill [i.e., Ibn Battuta's tent] with the standard in front of it, which is the mark of a new arrival, and sent pages and maidens to greet me and convey her salutations, herself halting to wait for them.
Ibn Battuta returns to the steppe kingdom of Uzbeg Khan, from where he journeys on deeper into Central Asia and then to India, Java, and China; he then returns westward and homeward, arriving at the city of Fez in Morocco in November of 1349.
Ibn Battuta returns to his native Tangiers After I had been privileged to observe this noble majesty and to share in the all-embracing bounty of his beneficence, I set out to visit the tomb of my mother.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/source/1354-ibnbattuta.html   (22791 words)

  
 Medieval Sourcebook: Ibn Batuta (1307-1377 CE): Travels
Ibn Battuta was the Arab equivalent of Marco Polo.
The Brotherhood which Ibn Batutta found in Konia, and which was distinguished from the other guilds in Anatolia by its special insignia of the trousers and its claim to spiritual descent from Ali was probablay a relic of the order founded by the romantic Caliph.
Ibn Batuta's description agrees best with New Sarai, ruins of which extend over a distance of more than forty miles, and cover an area of over twenty square miles.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/source/batuta.html   (4854 words)

  
 Ibn Batuta
By implication from his Rihla (travelogue) which he recited to the Andalusian scholar Ibn Juzayy at the end of his career, we know that he received a Maaliki education in the sciences and quranic law— the sharia'a.
Unlike the Polos who were traders and had travelled across the lands in search of trade routes, Batuta was a member of the learned gentry, his trip remains one of a personal and spiritual nature.
His stated goal was to travel across the fast growing Islamic world, to visit holy sufis and monuments to the Prophet, and to administer the rule o f the sharia'a in the Islamic frontier.
homepage.mac.com /sandeep/batuta/batuta.html   (685 words)

  
 Ibn Batuta
In Batuta's era the rhetoric of Islam was used to control the trade routes and spread the religion.
Ibn Juzayy, an acquaintance of Batuta from his visit to Granada would be his scribe and editor.
The Adventures of Ibn Batuta, a muslim traveler of the 14th century.
homepage.mac.com /sandeep/batuta/batuta2.html   (640 words)

  
 The 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Connecting Culture, Creating Trust
Ibn Batuta was a follower of Sufism, the mystical component of Islam.
In Mecca, Ibn Batuta reported that the market street was “overflowing with figs, grapes, pomegranates, quinces, peaches, lemons, walnuts, palm-fruit, watermelons, cucumbers, and all the vegetables.” He praised China for “the excellence of its plums and watermelons, the enormous size of its chickens.”
Ibn Batuta was one of the most remarkable travelers in the history of the Silk Road.
www.silkroadproject.org /smithsonian/samarkand/travelers.html   (493 words)

  
 Ibn Batuta   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Ibn Batuta's contribution in geography is unquestionably as great as that of any geographer yet the accounts of his travels are not easily accessible except to the specialist.
Ibn Batuta began by traversing the coast of the Mediterranean from Tangier to Alexandria, finding time to marry two wives on the road.
Ibn Batuta was the only medieval traveler who is known to have visited the lands of every Muslim ruler of his time.
www.islamonline.com /cgi-bin/news_service/profile_story.asp?service_id=711   (948 words)

  
 Islamic Network
Ibn Batuta started his journey on the 2nd of Rajab 725H and completed it on the 3rd of Dhul Hijjah 756H and he did not write anything down, rather after this journey he dictated to al-Kalbee the events of his journey from memory.
Ibn Batuta himself was opposed to ibn Taymiyyah, for he states in ‘Rihla’ (1/309), ‘and from the great Hanbalee Legal Jurists of Damascus was ibn Taymiyyah, except that he was lacking in his intellect.’ Hence it would have been easy for him to take on board the accusations without verifying them.
Ibn Taymiyyah was not the khateeb of the aforementioned masjid, rather it was Qaadee al-Qazwaynee.
www.islaam.net /main/display.php?id=320&category=35&PHPSESSID=b816112faffaf5de99470eaf3be33631   (1509 words)

  
 mockarticle   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Ibn Batuta (1304-1377) was one of the most remarkable travelers of all time.
Ibn Batuta left Morocco in 1325 and crossed Egypt to the Red Sea.
Ibn gave credit to King Mansa Musa who had worked hard to bring law and order to the land of Mali.
projects.edtech.sandi.net /ofarrell/journeyintoafrica/mockarticle.htm   (617 words)

  
 Kamat's Potpourri: Wandering Wonder Ibn Batuta
Ibn Batuta was born in Tangier in Morocco in 1305 A.D. He traveled in about forty-four countries of two continents risking life and limb many times.
The town of Honavar or Hinawr as Ibn Batuta calls it, was a big port and capital city in his time.
Ibn Batuta has further left interesting account of a dinner he had with sultan Iamaluddin.
www.kamat.com /kalranga/itihas/ibn-batuta.htm   (773 words)

  
 History of EXPLORATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Ibn Batuta's next ambition is to visit two of the most vigorous Muslim powers of his day, the Golden Horde in southern Russia and the Tughluq dynasty in Delhi.
In 1352 Ibn Batuta sets off south through the Sahara to visit the African kingdoms in the region of the Niger.
Ibn Batuta's detailed descriptions of these African territories are the main written source of information about them (one of the tasks, surely, of a successful explorer).
www.historyworld.net /wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?historyid=ab90   (1535 words)

  
 Ibn Batuta Biography
His name is also sometimes spelled ibn Batuta.
Almost all that is known about Ibn Battuta's life comes from one source -- Ibn Battuta himself.
In spots the things he claims he saw or did are probably fanciful, but in many others there is no way to know whether he is reporting or story-telling.
www.biographybase.com /biography/Ibn_Batuta.html   (2140 words)

  
 Ibn Battuta - Rihla
Ibn Battuta started on his travels when he was 20 years old in 1325.
Ibn Battuta mainly traveled in the area surrounded by the green line - countries with Muslim governments.
Ibn Battuta would seldom be far from fellow Muslims on his travels, and he would greatly benefit from the charity and hospitality offered to Muslim travelers and pilgrims.
www.sfusd.k12.ca.us /schwww/sch618/Ibn_Battuta/Ibn_Battuta_Rihla.html   (525 words)

  
 Untitled Document
The traveller Ibn Batuta visited the Maldives in early 1343 AD during her reign.
The writings of Ibn Batuta record some of the events and traditions of the Maldives during the reign of Rehendhi Khadeeja.
During Ibn Batuta's first visit to the Maldives, the Sultana was married to Wazeer Muhammed Al Jameel.
www.maldivesstory.com.mv /site%20files/after%20islam/latest/rehendhi-khadheeja.htm   (455 words)

  
 Shaykh al-Islaam ibn Taymiyyah (rahimahullaah)
Due to ibn Taymiyyah’s firm stance against all that was false and corrupt he earned the envy and hatred of all those that he opposed - who were many - and as such had many lies heaped around him.
Ibn Hajr said, "…those of his stances that were rejected from him were not said by him due to mere whims and desires and neither did he obstinately and deliberately persist in them after the evidence was established against him.
‘al-Bidaayah wan Nihaayah’ (14/27) of ibn Katheer and ‘Dhail `alaa Tabaqaat al-Hanabilaa’ (2/392) of ibn Rajab.
www.islamworld.net /tay.html   (9378 words)

  
 Caribbeanedu.com | Student Central   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
His full name was Muhammad ibn Abdullah ibn Batuta (also spelled Battuta).
He made a journey by way of Samarkand to India, where he resided for almost eight years at the court of the sultan of Delhi, who sent him to China as one of his ambassadors.He covered a total of 75,000 miles visiting the equivalent of 44 modern countries in all.
Ibn Batuta visited the Maldives, the Malabar coast,Ceylon (Sri Lanka), and Sumatra.
www.caribbeanedu.com /students/view.asp?artid=14.09.12   (208 words)

  
 De grondwet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Ibn Batuta was a fourteenth century Moroccan, who was a broad-minded religious scholar, judge and world traveller and as such personifies many of the values our schools should impart to the new generation.
This constitution shall be called the constitution of Ibn Batuta Educational Society Kosht, hereafter called IBESK, and it shall come into force on 15 February 2003.
Therefore, Ibn Batuta Community School Kosht will try to walk in front of others, offering a quality of education which does not only give importance to replication of course matter (as is required for the matriculation examinations).
www.ibcsk.com /nl/grondwet.htm   (6959 words)

  
 Ibn_Batuta   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
'''Abu Abdullah Mohammed ibn Batuta''' (ook gespeld '''Ibn Battuta''', ->1304-->1368 of ->1369) was een ->Amazigh reiziger, afkomstig uit ->Tanger in het huidige ->Marokko.
Ibn Batuta volgde de kust van Noord-Afrika tot aan ->Cairo, en reisde daarna de ->Nijl op alvorens over te steken naar de ->Rode Zee en Mekka, waar hij echter wegens een opstand niet kon komen.
Sindsdien is Ibn Batuta een bekend figuur in zowel de Moslimwereld als de ->Westerse wereld.
www.wat-betekent.be /Ibn_Batuta.html   (573 words)

  
 Ibn Battuta map sites
Because of the threat of bandits, his party had to stay over in a town for several days until a large enough caravan could be assembled.
Ibn Battuta used the seasonal winds, or monsoons to travel along the coast of East Africa and in the Indian Ocean.
Ibn Battuta visited Alanya and described it thus: The city of Alaiye is a large town on the seacoast.
www.sfusd.k12.ca.us /schwww/sch618/islam/nbLinks/Ibn_Battuta_map_sites.html   (2408 words)

  
 IBN BATUTA - Online Information article about IBN BATUTA
Chinese junks (the word used) and smaller vessels, but that carrying the other envoys and the presents, which started before Ibn Batuta was ready, was wrecked totally; the See also:
Ibn Batuta's statements and anecdotes regarding the showy virtues and solid vices of Sultan Muhammad Tughlak are in entire agreement with See also:
IBN DURAID [Abu Bakr Mahommed ibn ul-I3asan ibn Dur
encyclopedia.jrank.org /I27_INV/IBN_BATUTA.html   (1975 words)

  
 Ibn Batuta: Scope   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Ibn Batuta, the 14th century Moroccan traveler, described much of the known world of the time in his Rihla (Travels).
Ibn Batuta's writings are still the best source of information on medieval geography and deliver a fascinating perspective on the Haj (the Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca) as well as the Islamic social and political context of the middle ages.
Students of Arabic at UNC-Chapel Hill who have read an excerpt of Ibn Batuta’s Rihla in their textbook may be interested to learn more about his travels by reading translations of his work in English or French or by tackling a larger portion of the original Arabic work.
ils.unc.edu /dpr/path/ibnbatuta/scope.html   (281 words)

  
 Rizal's view on Tawalisi - Sept. 17, 2003   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Then there was Urduja's wish to invade India with her band of Amazons, or the gifts she lavished on Ibn Batuta that included two elephant loads of rice.
Ibn Batuta's travels of three decades started on a pilgrimage to Mecca, from where he proceeded to China, Russia, Spain, and even Timbuctu, a place I thought was as imaginary as Shangri-La, only to be told it is the present-day Mali.
Ibn Batuta spent 71 days, 34 going under sail and 37 days rowing.
www.inq7.net /opi/2003/sep/17/opi_arocampo-1.htm   (734 words)

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