Illegal immigration to the United States - Factbites
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Topic: Illegal immigration to the United States


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 BREITBART.COM - Report: Illegal Immigration Has Increased
The pace of illegal immigration to the United States has increased despite tighter security measures and it generally parallels the pace of economic growth and the availability of jobs, a report said Tuesday.
Immigration levels closely mirror economic conditions in the United States _ as the economy improves, immigration increases _ suggesting that the lure of jobs is a strong factor in attracting people to this country, the report says.
_Since 2001, the number of legal permanent residents entering the United States has declined from 578,000 to 455,000, while the number of illegal immigrants has increased from 549,000 to 562,000.
www.breitbart.com /news/2005/09/27/D8CSLBDG0.html   (474 words)

  
 The Immigration Blog
Prosecution, or the lack thereof, for immigration violations is the responsibility of the various Offices of the United States Attorneys throughout the country.
Thanks in large part to the efforts of Tancredo and his House Immigration Reform Caucus, H.R. 4437, the "Border Protection, Antiterrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act of 2005" [PDF] was approved by the House of Representatives on December 16, 2005.
Illegally entering the United States is a federal "crime" now, but not the mere fact of an alien’s unlawful presence.
michellemalkin.com /immigration   (3380 words)

  
 Immigration
"Would you favor or oppose allowing immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally to apply for work permits which would allow them to stay and work in the United States?"
"Allowing illegal immigrants who have jobs in the United States to apply for legal, temporary-worker status"
Other people say that illegal immigrants are taking jobs away from U.S. citizens.
www.pollingreport.com /immigration.htm   (1040 words)

  
 List of United States immigration legislation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 granted amnesty to illegal immigrants who had been in the United States before 1982 but made it a crime to hire an illegal immigrant.
The Immigration and Nationality Act (or McCarran-Walter Act) of 1952 somewhat liberalized immigration from Asia, but increased the power of the government to deport illegal immigrants suspected of Communist sympathies.
Categories: Legal history of the United States
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/List_of_United_States_Immigration_Acts   (466 words)

  
 Illegal Immigration Spot Report
However, not only is this illegal immigration illegal to begin with, it is also precipitating a host of problems for the United States of America.
At least 10 million illegal immigrants are in the U.S. now, and that'll double in five years." (Dallas Morning News, Rancher in border case backs Minuteman, 04/03/2005) FOXNews.com reports that "public health care in Los Angeles is on life support, where sixty percent of the county's uninsured patients are not U.S. citizens.
We ask that you keep the issue of illegal immigration at the forefront of your thoughts and to act upon this issue to the best of your abilities.
www.militaryspot.com /illegal-immigration.htm   (1303 words)

  
 IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT - Updated 11/1/96
This document was prepared to assist in implementing the transition to a new system based on major changes to the INA enacted in the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 and the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996.
IIRIRA is the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996.
301 nationals and citizens of the united states at birth
www.immigration-usa.com /ina_96.html   (1303 words)

  
 The Illegal Alien Problem: Enforcing the Immigration Laws; United States IMMIGRATION MENU
The Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 was signed into law by President Reagan and included amnesty for aliens who could establish residence in the United States since January 1, 1982, employer sanctions aimed at removing the lure of employment, and a special exemption for aliens employed in agricultural work.
The Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 included a provision for special agricultural workers, and Congress is presently considering legislation that would allow temporary workers in the United States.
For the illegal alien, the informal societal reactions may, in fact, perpetuate the condition we experience in the United States.
www.immigration-usa.com /george_weissinger.html   (6577 words)

  
 Numbers USA
The Center for Immigration Studies has reported that Census Bureau stats show that 700,000 to 800,000 new illegal aliens were settling in the U.S. during the late 1990s and that around 1 million settled in the most recent year of record.
But a large percentage of Congress -- a majority on certain measures -- also believe that virtually all illegal aliens who get past the guards at the border or who enter legally and overstay their visas should be allowed to remain in the United States forever.
Citizens are arrested while illegal aliens go about their business freely and act contrary to the law, with impunity.'
www.numbersusa.com /interests/illegalimm.html   (1286 words)

  
 Illegal Immigration
This conclusion is derived from a draft report given to the House immigration subcommittee by the INS that estimated the illegal population was 3.5 million in 1990.
It is important to note that the 500,000 annual increase is the net growth in the illegal-alien population (new illegal immigration minus deaths, legalizations, and out-migration).
This was not due to amnesty legislation, but rather reflects how the legal immigration process embraces illegal immigration and encourages it through legal exemptions.
www.cis.org /topics/illegalimmigration.html   (1871 words)

  
 Illegal Mexican Immigration Invasion - Nation of Aztlan Act of War
U.S. Intelligence and Military are concerned that 'illegal alien' pipelines have become open conduits for smuggling Al Qaeda Terrorists across the border and into the United States, to say nothing of the documented narcotics trafficking connections.
ABP has a mandate to make information about illegal immigration available to the public.
The 34.24 million immigrants (legal and illegal) now living in the country is the highest number ever recorded in American history and a 4.3-million increase since 2000.
www.alpinesurvival.com /immigration.html   (4488 words)

  
 Immigration to the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The United States of America has had a long history of immigration, from the first Spanish and English settlers to arrive on the shores of the what would become the United States to the waves of immigrants from Europe in the 19th century to immigration in the present day.
The 1850 United States census was the first federal U.S. census to query about the "nativity" of citizens—where they were born, either in the United States or outside of it—and is thus the first point at which solid statistics become available.
The population of the colonies that later became the United States grew from zero Europeans in the mid- 1500s to 3.2 million Europeans and 700,000 African slaves in 1790.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Immigration_to_the_United_States   (4488 words)

  
 Freedom of Information and Privacy Acts
Files are maintained on all immigrants into the United States, transient visitors, undesirable aliens, violators of immigration and naturalization laws, petitioners for naturalization, and enemy aliens.
Records pertaining to the investigation of illegal entry, smuggling, and fraudulent documents, as well as administration of the agency are also maintained.
Washington, D.C. Please note: FOIA requests should be directed to the Immigration Office that maintains the records sought, if known, or to the Immigration Field Office nearest your place of residence.
www.uscis.gov /graphics/aboutus/foia   (4488 words)

  
 Immigration to the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The United States of America has had a long history of immigration, from the first Spanish and English settlers to arrive on the shores of the what would become the United States to the waves of immigrants from Europe in the 19th century to immigration in the present day.
The population of the colonies that later became the United States grew from zero Europeans in the mid-1500s to 3.2 million Europeans and 700,000 African slaves in 1790.
The 1850 United States census was the first federal U.S. census to query about the "nativity" of citizens—where they were born, either in the United States or outside of it—and is thus the first point at which solid statistics become available.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Immigration_to_the_United_States   (4488 words)

  
 99.03.01: Immigration in the United States
The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 offered amnesty to illegal aliens who had lived in the United States continuously since before January 1, 1982, or who had worked at least 90 days at farm labor in the United States between May 1, 1985, and May 1, 1986.
Immigration laws favor relatives of U.S. citizens; refugees; and people with skills needed in the United States.
In 1896 the United States Supreme Court ruled that it was all right for states to set up school that were "separate but equal."
www.yale.edu /ynhti/curriculum/units/1999/3/99.03.01.x.html   (8544 words)

  
 IMMIGRATION & THE UNITED STATES
During the last few years increasing attention has been focused on the question of immigration, both legal and illegal (undocumented).
For example, the current immigration law, reports of various committees examining immigration, and even party positions on the issues involved are some of the types of sources that should be examined.
In addition, both the federal government and state government sections of the USCGopher to see if there are items that will be relevant to your particular research.
www.usc.edu /isd/archives/ethnicstudies/immig_main.html   (163 words)

  
 Center for Immigration Studies
New immigration, both legal and illegal, is primarily driven by the size of the existing immigrant population because it is the relatives and friends of people already here who provide information about opportunities in the United States to prospective immigrants living overseas.
So this suggests that Middle Eastern immigration in the United States is perhaps becoming more like that in Western Europe with a sizable share being lower income and lower middle class rather than the elite phenomenon that had been primarily until relatively recently.
One is an essay entitled, "Muslim Immigrants in the United States," coauthored by Daniel Pipes and Khalid Durán
www.cis.org /articles/2002/mideastpanel.html   (163 words)

  
 The Federalist Society
Section 245(i) allows certain illegal entrants or immigration violators to adjust their status to that of lawful permanent resident without leaving the United States, provided that they meet all of the requirements for such adjustment, including the requirement that they undergo a criminal background check.
Weak United States immigration laws, however, were not the problem that allowed terrorists to enter the United States and attack on September 11, 2001.
Current U.S. immigration laws also contain provisions allowing the Attorney General to require foreigners in the United States to register and be fingerprinted [24].
www.fed-soc.org /Publications/Terrorism/immigration.htm   (8669 words)

  
 IMMIGRATION AND THE UNITED STATES, Term Papers 2000, Term papers, 051122
Laws passed regarding legal and illegal immigration are discussed, and the impact the immigrant population has on the labor force in the United States is examined.
Examining trends of Jewish immigration to the United States from 1650's to modern times.
This essay examines the history of immigration and presents a time sequence of cultures immigrating to the United States.
www.termpapers2000.com /lib/essay/Immigration-and-the-United-States.html?a=search1   (2895 words)

  
 United States Mexico barrier - Wikpedia
The United States Mexico barrier is actually several separation barriers designed to prevent illegal immigration into the United States from the territory of adjacent Mexico.
Between October 1, 2003, and April 30, 2004, 660,390 people were detained by the United States Border Patrol as they tried to cross the border illegally.
Some United States/Mexico border scholars have claimed that these operations are just a public relations ploy used to convince U.S. citizens that the border is "secure", while the economy benefits from the continuing flow of cheap labor across the border.
www.bostoncoop.net /~tpryor/wiki/index.php?title=United_States_Mexico_barrier   (2895 words)

  
 math lessons - Immigration to the United States
The United States of America has had a long history of immigration, from the first Spanish and English settlers to arrive on the shores of the what would become the United States to the waves of immigrants from Europe in the 19th century to immigration in the present day.
The 1850 United States census was the first federal U.S. census to query about the "nativity" of citizens—where they were born, either in the United States or outside of it—and is thus the first point at which solid statistics become available.
The population of the colonies that later became the United States grew from zero Europeans in the mid-1500s to 3.2 million Europeans and 700,000 African slaves in 1790.
www.mathdaily.com /lessons/Immigration_to_the_United_States   (2895 words)

  
 99.03.01: Immigration in the United States
The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 offered amnesty to illegal aliens who had lived in the United States continuously since before January 1, 1982, or who had worked at least 90 days at farm labor in the United States between May 1, 1985, and May 1, 1986.
At times, the United States, like many receiving countries, has restricted immigration to maintain a more homogeneous society in which all the people share similar ethnic, geographic, and cultural background.
These are stories about people who immigrated to the United States.
www.yale.edu /ynhti/curriculum/units/1999/3/99.03.01.x.html   (8544 words)

  
 Federation for American Immigration Reform - Home Page
The Mexican government has issued a guide book for illegal aliens coming to the U.S. Download the PDF of this book.
What do the elections mean for immigration reform?
This analysis looks specifically at the costs of education, medical care and incarceration, which are the major cost categories for the state.
www.fairus.org   (8544 words)

  
 FIRE Coalition
[Editor’s Note: This research in included to educate readers that what is presently the Southwest United States was acquired under two separate purchases from the Government of Mexico; and to lay to rest completely inaccurate and misleading assertions frequently made by radical pro-illegal immigration activists that this territory was somehow “stolen” from Mexico.]
In 1854, the United States purchased a strip of territory (approximately 30,000 square miles) from Mexico in what is now southwestern New Mexico and southern Arizona.
Opponents have called the billboards "a slap in the face to Californians and a pretty blatant one," and further stated "This is almost a poster-board for illegal immigration… This is America.
www.firecoalition.com /southwest.shtml   (8544 words)

  
 U.S. Amnesties for Illegal Aliens
According to INS estimates released in October, 2000, the amnesties granted in 1986 as a result of the Immigration Reform and Control Act significantly contributed to an increase in illegal immigration as the relatives of newly legalized illegal immigrants came illegally to the United States to join their family members.
The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA) was enacted by Congress in response to the large and rapidly growing illegal alien population in the United States.
Amnesties are all too common legislative efforts to forgive the breaking of immigration laws and to make it possible for illegal aliens to live permanently in the United States.
www.numbersusa.com /interests/amnesty_print.html   (1599 words)

  
 Control Immigration Action to set and enforce standards on immigration, temporary admission, naturalization and the removal of aliens
The government has changed its immigration policy several times to maintain the delineation between legal and illegal immigration and to allow people from different parts of the world to move to the United States.
To discourage people from entering the country illegally, Congress authorized over $400 million per year for two years to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) [http://www.ins.usdoj.gov/] and strengthened penalties for knowingly hiring an illegal immigrant or smuggling illegal immigrants into the United States.
In 1986, Congress passed the Immigration Reform and Control Act, a comprehensive overhaul of immigration policy designed to nationalize all of the country?s permanent inhabitants and prevent illegal entrance in the future.
www.brook.edu /gs/cps/research/projects/50ge/endeavors/immigration.htm   (852 words)

  
 Control Immigration Action to set and enforce standards on immigration, temporary admission, naturalization and the removal of aliens
The government has changed its immigration policy several times to maintain the delineation between legal and illegal immigration and to allow people from different parts of the world to move to the United States.
To discourage people from entering the country illegally, Congress authorized over $400 million per year for two years to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) [http://www.ins.usdoj.gov/] and strengthened penalties for knowingly hiring an illegal immigrant or smuggling illegal immigrants into the United States.
In 1986, Congress passed the Immigration Reform and Control Act, a comprehensive overhaul of immigration policy designed to nationalize all of the country?s permanent inhabitants and prevent illegal entrance in the future.
www.brook.edu /gs/cps/research/projects/50ge/endeavors/immigration.htm   (852 words)

  
 Immigration
"How serious a problem do you believe the illegal immigration situation is in the United States today?
"Should legal immigration into the United States be kept at its present level, increased, or decreased?"
If an illegal immigrant has a baby while living in the United States, do you think the child should automatically become a U.S. citizen or not?"
www.pollingreport.com /immigration.htm   (1040 words)

  
 Congressional Immigration Reform Caucus
Currently, the United States grants automatic citizenship to children born in the United States, regardless of whether a particular child’s parents are United States citizens, legal permanent residents, temporary visitors, nonimmigrants, or illegal aliens.
Likewise, Congress must declare that the child of an illegal alien inherits the status of his parent; thus, the child, like his parent should be deemed to be an illegal alien.
Often, immigration agents release them with a notice to appear in court before an immigration judge.
tancredo.house.gov /irc/welcome.htm   (1911 words)

  
 Immigration reduction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Birthright citizenship to children born in the United States to illegal aliens, which some believe is guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, is opposed by immigration reductionists.
This can include a reduction in the numbers of legal immigrants, advocating for stronger action to be taken to prevent illegal immigrants from entering the country, and reductions in non-immigrant temporary work visas (such as H-1B and L-1 in the United States).
Immigration reduction refers to movements active within the United States that advocate a reduction in the amount of immigration allowed into the United States or other countries.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Immigration_reduction   (2536 words)

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