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Topic: Immanuel Wallerstein


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In the News (Wed 24 Apr 19)

  
  Immanuel Wallerstein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Immanuel Wallerstein (born 1930) is a U.S. sociologist.
Wallerstein held several positions as visiting professor at universities worldwide, was awarded multiple honorary titles, intermittently served as Directeur d'études associé at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris, and was president of the International Sociological Association between 1994 and 1998.
Wallerstein began as an expert of post-colonial African affairs, which his publications were almost exclusively devoted to until the early 1970s, when he began to distinguish himself as a historian and theorist of the global capitalist economy on a macroscopic level.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Immanuel_Wallerstein   (1321 words)

  
 wallersteinlatinamerica
Immanuel Wallerstein’s “World-System” theory has been discarded by many contemporary historians who see it as either Eurocentric in its overarching formulations, which are said to deny agency to subaltern peoples, or as deficient in its ability to describe real world economic motivations and transitions, for example: the shift from feudalism to capitalism.
Wallerstein does not assume the price rise was directly caused by the influx of bullion, but, as Jorge Nadal notes, by the increase in employment and utilization of resources that it caused, in other words, the ability to convert the bullion into real growth.
Wallerstein’s goal is to examine a “singular historical system which has been organized as a capitalist world-economy.” [48] While many correctly worry that a focus on too large an area, the whole world, can obscure the significance and meaning of local events, the opposite is also true.
userwww.sfsu.edu /~motopu/wallerstein-14.html   (6949 words)

  
 Waggish: Immanuel Wallerstein: Don't Encourage Him By Proving Him Right
Wallerstein is the man who has claimed for some time that the United States's global influence and hegemony has been in inevitable decline for thirty years and its leaders are simply deluding themselves that it will be king of the hill for much longer.
Wallerstein argues that the U.S. was already a major economic power by 1914--fair enough--but it's hard to see how the U.S.'s claim to global dominance even became an issue before the 20's and 30's.
Wallerstein does not claim this (well, he didn't in 2002; I wonder what he is saying now), but he does say that there is far less prestige for the U.S. to squander than is commonly thought.
www.waggish.org /2003/03/immanuel_wallerstein_dont_encourage_him_by_proving_him_right.html   (826 words)

  
 Immanuel Wallerstein's Major Works   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
In The Capitalist World-Economy Immanuel Wallerstein focuses on the two central conflicts of capitalism, bourgeois versus proletarian and core versus periphery, in an attempt to describe both the cyclical rhythms and the secular transformations of capitalism, conceived as a singular world-system.
Immanuel Wallerstein is one of the most innovative social scientists of his generation.
Wallerstein divides his work between an appraisal of significant recent events and a study of the shifts in thought influenced by those events.
faculty.rsu.edu /~felwell/Theorists/Wallerstein/WallersteinBooks.htm   (1312 words)

  
 49th Parallel Summer Issue 2004
Wallerstein asserts that the political structures that existed in non-capitalist systems did not operate in the same way of the modern state, and that they constituted a qualitatively different kind of institution.
For Wallerstein, the distinctive feature of a capitalist world-economy is that economic decisions are oriented primarily to the arena of the world-economy, while political decisions are oriented primarily to the smaller structures that have legal control, the states within the world-economy.
Wallerstein defined feudalism as “a series of tiny economic nodules whose population and productivity were slowly increasing, and in which the legal mechanisms ensured that the bulk of the surplus went to the landlords who had noble status and control of the judicial machinery.”[29]
www.49thparallel.bham.ac.uk /back/issue14/bentivoglio.htm   (5978 words)

  
 ALA | C&RL, July 1997, Vol. 58, No. 4, Wallerstein book review   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Immanuel Wallerstein, distinguished professor of sociology, president of the International Sociological Association, and director of the Fernand Braudel Center for the Study of Economics, Historical Systems, and Civilizations at the State University of New York, Binghamton, is perhaps the preeminent scholar of the social sciences in relation to world systems and their study.
Wallerstein, along with ten other scholars of world renown (six from the social sciences, two from the natural sciences, and two from the humanities), has brought to the fore several consequential issues for deliberation regarding the existing disciplinary structure of the social sciences.
In the first section of this book, the authors carefully outline the social and historical construction of the social sciences as a form of knowledge that was organized around two separate antinomies_one between the past and the present, and the second between the descriptive (nomothetic) and the interpretive (idiographic) disciplines.
www.ala.org /ala/acrl/acrlpubs/crljournal/backissues1997b/july97/wallersteinbook.htm   (914 words)

  
 English
Wallerstein insists that we moderns are simply re-enacting the structural roles established in the 16th century.
Wallerstein allows that Diop’s claims are a bit “sweeping,” but he has given us “a bold hypothesis, not without supporting data.” Still, to think in terms of ordinary notions of true and false misses Wallerstein’s essential point.
Braudel portrays Wallerstein as someone who would impose “a rigid schema” on European history; who underestimates the importance of European influence on Asia and Africa prior to their “incorporation” in the 18th century; and whose duree is not longue enough.
www.geocities.com /zed_chaotics/english/iwp.htm   (5361 words)

  
 Historical Capitalism with Capitalist Civilization
In this revised edition of his highly readable book, Immanuel Wallerstein provides a condensation of the central ideas of his monumental study of capitalism as an integrated, historical entity: the modern world system.
Wallerstein pays particular attention to the emergence and development of a unified world market, and the concomitant international division of labour.
Immanuel Wallerstein is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Binghamton University and Director of the Fernand Braudel Center for the Study of Economies, Historical Systems, and Civilizations.
www.versobooks.com /books/tuvwxyz/w-titles/wallerstein_historical.shtml   (215 words)

  
 Modern History Sourcebook: Wallerstein on World Systems
According to Wallerstein, his theory makes possible a comprehensive understanding of the external and internal manifestations of the modernization process during this period and makes possible analytically sound comparisons between different parts of the world.
According to Wallerstein, the semi-peripheries were exploited by the core but, as in the case of the American empires of Spain and Portugal, often were exploiters of peripheries themselves.
However, Wallerstein asserts that an analysis of the history of the capitalist world system shows that it has brought about a skewed development in which economic and social disparities between sections of the world economy have increased rather than provided prosperity for all.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/mod/wallerstein.html   (2442 words)

  
 Margo Kingston's Webdiary - smh.com.au   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Strange then that as the 20th century closed Immanuel Wallerstein a much more substantial scholar, told us that the ‘world system’, as he terms it, is in terminal decline and has entered a period of transition.
Wallerstein believes that the period of transition we are entering allows us space and opportunity to break out, to recreate our polity and economy in a fashion more friendly to personal growth, creativity, and the possibility of personal freedom and transformation.
Wallerstein is aware of a whole new group of ‘anti-globalisation movements’ who first became apparent at the Seattle meeting of the WTO in 1999.
webdiary.smh.com.au /archives/margo_kingston/000272.html   (5321 words)

  
 Immanuel Wallerstein: World-Systems Analysis: An Introduction - Bøger
In World-Systems Analysis, Immanuel Wallerstein provides a concise and accessible introduction to the comprehensive approach that he pioneered thirty years ago to understanding the history and development of the modern world.
Now, for the first time in one volume, Wallerstein offers a succinct summary of world-systems analysis and a clear outline of the modern world-system, describing the structures of knowledge upon which it is based, its mechanisms, and its future.
Wallerstein explains the defining characteristics of world-systems analysis: its emphasis on world-systems rather than nation-states, on the need to consider historical processes as they unfold over long periods of time, and on combining within a single analytical framework bodies of knowledge usually viewed as distinct from one another—such as history, political science, economics, and sociology.
www.totaltiorden.dk /shop/product_details.php/0822334429   (266 words)

  
 Amazon.com: The Essential Wallerstein: Books: Immanuel Maurice Wallerstein   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Immanuel Wallerstein directs the Fernand Braudel Center at Binghamton University and is affiliated with the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Paris.
The weakness of Wallerstein's work in general, however, with his focus on the structural regularities (with the main exception of the limits of geographic expansion that are key to the system's demise), is a tendency to see capitalism as *essentially* the same from 1550 to the recent present.
The weakness of Wallerstein's work in general, however, with his focus on the structural regularies (with the main exception of the limits of geographic expansion that are key to the system's demise) is a tendency to see capitalism as *essentially* the same from 1550 to the resent present.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1565845935?v=glance   (2118 words)

  
 Róbinson Rojas.- Papers of the Fernand Braudel Center: Arrighi, Wallerstein, et al.- RRojas Databank: Analysis and ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Immanuel Wallerstein, "The ANC and South Africa: The Past and Future of Liberation Movements in the World-System,"
Immanuel Wallerstein, "The Rise of East Asia, or The World-System in the Twenty-First Century,"
Immanuel Wallerstein, "The So-called Asian Crisis: Geopolitics in the Longue Durée"
www.rrojasdatabank.org /papers.htm   (1321 words)

  
 Quo Vadis America?
Social theorist Immanuel Wallerstein argues that an overwhelming majority of the world now regards the US as a dangerous giant, perhaps malicious, perhaps merely ignorant.
The question on everyone’s mind, Wallerstein writes, is thus: "Quo vadis America?" The question of where the US is going will likely be the most important in international politics for the next decade.
Immanuel Wallerstein is Senior Research Scholar at Yale University and author of the new book, "The Decline of American Power: The US in a Chaotic World".
yaleglobal.yale.edu /display.article?id=4234   (1461 words)

  
 Questioning the New Imperial World Order
Immanuel Wallerstein a été président de l'Association internationale de sociologie (AIS) en 1995, directeur d'études associé à l'École des Hautes études en sciences sociales de Paris, professeur invité de sociologie à l'Université du Québec à Montréal.
Immanuel Wallerstein prolonge les travaux de Fernand Braudel sur « l’économie-monde », analysant la constitution du capitalisme dans la longue durée.
Immanuel Wallerstein is director of the Fernand Braudel Centre for the Study of Economies, Historical Systems and Civilizations at Binghamton University, and Senior Research Scholar at Yale University.
www.brusselstribunal.org /bios/Wallerstein.htm   (2302 words)

  
 The End of the World As We Know It   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The second half of the book takes up current issues in the world of knowledge—the vanishing faith in rationality, the scattering of knowledge activities, the denunciation of Eurocentrism, the questioning of the division of knowledge into science and humanities, and the relation of the search for the true and the search for the good.
"Immanuel Wallerstein is one of the most well-known and influential social scientists of his generation.
Immanuel Wallerstein is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and director of the Fernand Braudel Center at Binghamton University.
www.upress.umn.edu /Books/w/wallerstein_end.html   (477 words)

  
 Amazon.com: After Liberalism: Books: Immanuel Wallerstein   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Wallerstein, a distinguished historian and sociologist who teaches in Paris and New York and a champion of the left in the Marxist tradition, seeks to provide some of that intellectual buttressing.
Wallerstein started out as a specialist in African politics, but since the 1970s he has been known for his books on the "modern capitalist world-system." His latest work is a collection of recent essays examining the rise and fall of liberalism as the organizing principle of the modern world-system.
According to Wallerstein, the period from 1789 to 1989 represents the era of economic and political liberalism.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1565843045?v=glance   (903 words)

  
 The Globalization Website - Theories
The nineteenth-century ideology of reform-oriented liberalism, which held out the hope of equal individual rights and economic advancement for all within states, became dominant in the twentieth but lost influence after 1968.
Such twentieth-century developments set the stage for what Wallerstein calls a period of transition.
New crises of contraction can no longer be solved by exploiting new markets; economic decline will stimulate struggle in the core; challenges to core dominance will gather strength in the absence of a strong hegemonic power and a globally accepted ideology; polarization will push the system to the breaking point.
www.sociology.emory.edu /globalization/theories01.html   (1743 words)

  
 Immanuel Wallerstein
Born in 1930, Immanuel Wallerstein has since 1976 been Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the State University of New York (SUNY) in Binghamton.
He is the founder and director of the Fernand Braudel Center for the Study of Economies, Historical Systems, and Civilizations in Binghamton.
Wallerstein's so called 'World-Systems Theory' is a politico-economic and comparative macro-theory of social development, in particular capitalism.
www.economyprofessor.com /theorists/immanuelwallerstein.php   (86 words)

  
 Alibris: Immanuel Wallerstein
Wallerstein provides a condensation of the central ideas of his monumental study of capitalism: The Modern World-System.
In this new edition of a classic work -- now with a new preface -- on the roots of social scientific thinking, Immanuel Wallerstein develops a thorough-going critique of the legacy of nineteenth-century social science for social thought in the new millennium.
Concerned about the worldwide state of the social sciences-the relations among disciplines, and their relationship with both the humanities and the natural sciences-the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, based in Lisbon, established in 1933 the Gulbenkian Commission on the Restructuring of the Social Sciences.
www.alibris.com /search/books/author/Immanuel_Wallerstein   (861 words)

  
 Commentary Magazine - Africa: The Politics of Independence, by Immanuel Wallerstein   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
...One might question Wallerstein's sanguine view that, because African totalitarianism is born of legitimate and easily understood causes, all in Africa is for the best...
...Wallerstein is unerring in his analysis of the process' main features: the need to create, in countries with a random set of borders drawn by accidents of colonial history, a sense of nationhood...
...Wallerstein can be excused for treating it scantily in his short book...
www.commentarymagazine.com /Summaries/V33I4P86-1.htm   (1170 words)

  
 Immanuel Wallerstein: The Uncertainties of Knowledge - Print
The Uncertainties of Knowledge extends Immanuel Wallerstein's decade-long work of elucidating the crisis of knowledge in current intellectual thought.
He argues that the disciplinary divisions of academia have trapped us in a paradigm that assumes knowledge is a certainty and that it can help us explain the social world.
Instead, Wallerstein offers a new conception of the social sciences, one whose methodology allows for uncertainties.
www.temple.edu /tempress/titles/1734_reg_print.html   (356 words)

  
 Immanuel Wallerstein: Unthinking Social Science
In this, new edition of a classic work—now with a new preface—on the roots of social scientific thinking, Immanuel Wallerstein develops a thorough-going critique of the legacy of nineteenth-century social science for social thought in the new millennium.
Wallerstein also offers a critical discussion of the key figures whose ideas have influenced the position he formulates—including Karl Marx and Fernand Braudel, among others.
Immanuel Wallerstein is the Director of the Fernand Braudel Center for the Study of Economies, Historical Systems and Civilizations at the State University of New York at Binghamton, where he is also an emeritus Distinguished Professor of Sociology.
www.temple.edu /tempress/titles/1607_reg.html   (544 words)

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