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Topic: Imperial unit


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In the News (Wed 17 Apr 19)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
In metrology, Imperial units (also called British units) are the measurement units that were generally used in the British Commonwealth countries in the past.
The Imperial gallon is defined as the volume of 10 avoirdupois pounds of water under specified conditions, and the Imperial bushel is defined as 8 Imperial gallons.
In the United States these two are not the same, the gallon and its subdivisions are used in the measurement of liquids; the bushel, with its subdivisions, is used in the measurement of certain dry commodities.
www.wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/i/im/imperial_unit.html   (942 words)

  
 Foot (unit of length) - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
A foot (plural: feet) is a non-SI unit of distance or length, measuring around a third of a metre.
The most commonly used foot today is the English foot, used in the United Kingdom and the United States and elsewhere, which is defined to be exactly 0.3048 metre.
The imperial foot was adapted from an Egyptian measure by the Greeks, with a subsequent larger foot being adopted by the Romans.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/f/e/e/Feet.html   (412 words)

  
 Foot (unit of length) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The foot is a common and popular unit of measurement in the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada.
In 1958 the United States and countries of the Commonwealth of Nations defined the length of the international yard to be 0.9144 metres.
Some metrologists speculate that the imperial foot was adapted from an Egyptian measure by the Greeks, with a subsequent larger foot being adopted by the Romans.
www.knowledgehunter.info /wiki/Foot_(unit_of_length)   (706 words)

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