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Topic: Imprinting (psychology)


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  Medicine: Psychology and Psychiatry topics on Encyclopedia.com
Gestalt [Ger.,=form], school of psychology that interprets phenomena as organized wholes rather than as aggregates of distinct parts, maintaining that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.
imprinting acquisition of behavior in many animal species, in which, at a critical period early in life, the animals form strong and lasting attachments.
psychology science or study of the thought processes and behavior of humans and other animals in their interaction with the environment.
www.encyclopedia.com /category/Medicine/Psychology/psych.html   (2871 words)

  
 Psychology Encyclopedia
Psychology as a medical discipline can be seen in Thomas Willis' reference to psychology (the "Doctrine of the Soul") in terms of brain function, as part of his 1672 anatomical treatise "De Anima Brutorum" ("Two Discourses on the Souls of Brutes").
Counseling psychology is a psychology specialty that facilitates personal and interpersonal functioning across the lifespan with a focus on emotional, social, vocational, educational, health-related, developmental, and organizational concerns.
Research in psychology is conducted in broad accord with the standards of the scientific method, encompassing both qualitative ethological and quantitative statistical modalities to generate and evaluate explanatory hypotheses with regard to psychological phenomena.
www.hallencyclopedia.com /topic/Psychology.html   (7797 words)

  
 Psychology History
Imprinting is the primary formation of social bonds in infant animals (Hess, 1973).
Imprinting to moving objects is a form of species specific behavior, since only a few species of birds exhibit this kind of behavior.
From his initial analysis of imprinting, Lorenz went on to identify the essential components of innate behavior and developed the central constructs of releasers and fixed action patterns which serve as the foundation of the study of animal behavior.
muskingum.edu /~psychology/psycweb/history/lorenz.htm   (703 words)

  
 Imprinting by Howard S. Hoffman
In doing so he implied that during a gosling or duckling's first encounter with a moving object the image of the object is somehow stamped irreversibly on the nervous system and for many years this was the accepted conception of the process.
Nor for that matter is imprinting a specialized phenomenon limited to a brief critical period early in a young bird's life, as was also claimed by the early investigators.
We now understand that imprinting works as follows: To be an appropriate target for social bonding an object (it could, of course, be a person or an animal) has to provide stimulation that is pleasurable and in this sense, comforting.
www.animatedsoftware.com /family/howardsh/imprint.htm   (588 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - imprinting (Psychology And Psychiatry) - Encyclopedia
In natural circumstances imprinting, to the mother, food, or surroundings, occurs instinctively during a biologically fixed time span; it is very difficult to extinguish.
Subsequent learning may be tied to and reinforced by the imprinted object, and later social behaviors, such as the greeting ceremony and courtship, may be directed exclusively to the mother-substitute.
There is evidence that in fowl the imprinting period begins before hatching and is characterized by vocal communication between mother and unhatched ducklings.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/I/imprinti.html   (291 words)

  
 Imprinting Summary
Imprinting is a term used in ethology (study of animal behavior) to describe the development of a stable behavioral pattern during a brief period of juvenile life (known as the "sensitive phase") in a social species.
Imprinting is the learning process through which the social preferences of animals of certain species become restricted to a particular object or class of objects.
Imprinting may mean: Imprinting (genetics) Imprinting (psychology), in psychology and ethology Molecular imprinting, in polymer chemistry See also Imprint, as used in publishing...
www.bookrags.com /Imprinting   (236 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for imprinting
imprinting A general descriptive term applied to a form of learning that only occurs early in a young animal's life.
In ethology, the trailing of a young bird or animal behind its parent or another organism or object, especially as a consequence of imprinting.
Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes: disorders of genomic imprinting.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=imprinting   (669 words)

  
 MA Somatic Psychology: Dance Movement Therapy and Body Psychotherapy Faculty's Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Somatic psychology does so because a body-centered perspective acknowledges that experiences are routed first through limbic, mid and lower brain centers, resulting in attitudes, orientations, and even behaviors that are well underway before they ever arrive at the neocortex (and therefore conscious awareness).
Somatic Psychology has recently been praised for its work with trauma and shock, yet has not often made the connection to imprinting, and therefore has in some cases neglected to see the possibility that adult trauma patterns may reflect a reoccurrence of very early learning, extending back to intrauterine life.
Birth psychology may benefit from this understanding, as it often focuses on the emotional sequelae to trauma and may inadvertently minimize the physical repatterning that the body craves.
www.naropa.edu /somatic/christinearticle2.html   (1388 words)

  
 Imprinting Encyclopedia of Psychology - Find Articles   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Imprinting is the process that prompts ducklings to form an attachment to their mothers-or whatever other moving object that appears-within the first two days of life.
Imprinting does not take place anytime after the first two days of life because by that time, it is believed, ducklings develop a fear of strange objects.
The discovery and study of imprinting have prompted continued examination of the relative roles of instinct and acquired behavior in the process of learning.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_g2699/is_0001/ai_2699000175   (245 words)

  
 Imprinting Encyclopedia of Psychology - Find Articles
Imprinting is the process that prompts ducklings to form an attachment to their mothers-or whatever other moving object that appears-within the first two days of life.
Imprinting does not take place anytime after the first two days of life because by that time, it is believed, ducklings develop a fear of strange objects.
The discovery and study of imprinting have prompted continued examination of the relative roles of instinct and acquired behavior in the process of learning.
findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_g2699/is_0001/ai_2699000175   (230 words)

  
 imprinting - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Imprinting is the term used in psychology and ethology to describe any kind of phase-sensitive learning (learning...
Genomic imprinting is the phenomenon whereby a small subset of all the genes in the genome are expressed according to their parent of origin.
Persona ™ Imprinting is an imprinting service offered through Creative Memories and, like our albums, guarantees imprinting for the life of the purchaser.
encarta.msn.com /imprinting.html   (196 words)

  
 Untitled
The term "imprinting" captures the idea that the form of the detector is shaped by the impinging stimulus.
Imprinting may occur for entire stimuli, in which case a receptor develops that internalizes specific instances.
Topological imprinting occurs when the space and the positions of patterns within the space are learned as a result of training with patterns.
cognitrn.psych.indiana.edu /rgoldsto/annual.html   (11246 words)

  
 Timothy Leary - Exopsychology
The imprint is a neuro-umbilical lifeline extended from the nervous system, blindly groping for hospitable survival stimuli to w attaches and roots—thus creating the reality island.
The notion of imprinting a form of immediate and irreversible "learning" —has created some confusion, since according to the classic definitions of most psychological theories, "Learning occurs as the result practice." But psychological theories of learning based on observation of external, visible behavior pay little attention to the internal, invisible neurological situation.
The new "hippie" imprints were not thoughtfully selected: a "drop-out" away from the parent-culture and an unfortunate tendency to reject technology and scientific thinking.
www.futurehi.net /docs/Exopsychology.html   (4996 words)

  
 Learning Who is Your Mother: Behavior of Imprinting
Some of the characteristics of imprinting could be explained by the tendency that the baby bird has to search for and responding selectively to particular stimulus patterns, such as the profile of an adult bird.
Before imprinting takes place, the brain of the young bird has a capacity to recognize the types of stimuli which will subsequently be associatively learned, and this is one of the innate components of imprinting.
In conclusion, imprinting is a wonderful example of the interaction of innate, species-specific behavior, and the properties of a special kind of learning, which has been called "perceptual learning" (Bateson, 1966).
www.cerebromente.org.br /n14/experimento/lorenz/index-lorenz.html   (1923 words)

  
 Spirit5
Physical imprints cause us to move forward toward that which is perceived as "nourishing," and cause us to move away from (backward) that which is perceived as "threatening." Every human is imprinted to/by the nipple (human or latex).
Since this imprint leads toward manipulation of the environment, we ironically find that it is itself subject to manipulation by agents of the environment, particularly in the guise of theologians, ideologists, and mass-media advertisers.
The causal imprint is something we have in common with about twenty percent of humanity: It is the blurring of the separation between body and mind; the release of this separation leads to a feeling of ecstasy.
www.angelfire.com /ca6/asi/Spirit5.htm   (3105 words)

  
 Evolutionary Psychology, Behaviorism, and the Incest Taboo
In evolutionary psychology telelogical viewpoints are fundamental, and physiological viewpoints incidental.
The difference is that unlike evolutionary psychology, a bio-behaviorism provides the opportunity for empirical test, and generalization to similar behaviors from established principles that are rooted in empirical data.
Thus, evolutionary psychology and behavioristic learning theory are incompatible because of their opposing estimates of the heuristic or research value of teleological versus ethologically guided experimental principles, and more significantly, their differing estimates as to the definition of scientific inquiry.
www.homestead.com /flowstate/incest.html   (2638 words)

  
 Life Before Birth: Body-Centered Therapies
Her innovative work called the "Moving Cycle," spotlights natural play, early physical imprinting, and the transformational effect of fully sequenced movement (www.themovingcycle.com). She has taught at the University of Maryland and George Washington University, and trains, teaches and lectures internationally.
Somatic psychology, then, is the study of the body/mind interface, the relationship of our physical matter and our energy, the interaction of our structures with our thoughts and actions.
Somatic therapies draw upon philosophy, medicine, physics, existing psychologies, and countless thousands of hours of human observation and clinical experience, to unify human beings into an organic and inseparable whole, for the purpose of healing, growth, and transformation.
www.birthpsychology.com /healing/body.html   (1679 words)

  
 INTEGRATIVE PSYCHOLOGY - LINKS
Humanism is opposed to the mechanical view of man and humanistic psychology stresses the capacity of man for personal growth.
In modern Psychology, a person who is withdrawn, restful and prefers to be alone.
When the right object for imprinting is not available the organism attaches itself to the object nearest to the search image.
www.psychology4all.com /IPsyGlossaryDetails.htm   (1105 words)

  
 Experimental Psychology Publications
Publishes articles relating to any areas of psychology which have a greater mathematical or statistical or other formal aspect of their argument than is usually acceptable to other journals.
Health Psychology is a scholarly journal devoted to furthering an understanding of scientific relationships between behavioral principles on the one hand and physical health and illness on the other.
Section B of The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology is a leading international journal which publishes in all areas of comparative and physiological psychology.
www.psychology.org /links/Publications/Experimental   (2241 words)

  
 Problem Description: Imprinting
This early social behavior among precocial birds has been termed imprinting and has been defined as a process that causes the newly hatched to become rapidly and strongly attached to social objects such as parents or parental surrogates.
That is, the higher the proximity score during a test or observation, the greater the likelihood that the subject has imprinted.
Additionally, the "critical period" during which imprinting can occur was thought to be limited and severely restricted to the animals very early life.
samiam.colorado.edu /~mcclella/expersim/introimprint.html   (812 words)

  
 SBGI NEWS CENTER
Somatic psychology does so because a body-centered perspective acknowledges that experiences are routed first through limbic, mid and lower brain centers, resulting in attitudes, orientations, and even behaviors that are well underway before they ever arrive at the neocortex (and therefore conscious awareness).
Somatic Psychology has recently been praised for its work with trauma and shock, yet has not often made the connection to imprinting, and therefore has in some cases neglected to see the possibility that adult trauma patterns may reflect a reoccurrence of very early learning, extending back to intrauterine life.
Birth psychology may benefit from this understanding, as it often focuses on the emotional sequelae to trauma and may inadvertently minimize the physical repatterning that the body craves.
www.sbgi.edu /news/caldwell.html   (1517 words)

  
 UTA - Department of Psychology
Topics such as learning, conditioning, reinforcement, foraging, imprinting, modeling, social behavior, group selection, and cultural behavior will be treated as varieties of phyletic adaptation in the evolution of hominids.
A survey of contemporary topics in personality psychology, including personality assessment, strategies for studying personality, temporal stability and cross-situational consistency in behavior, and personality influence on social behavior.
A survey of contemporary topics in social psychology, including interpersonal attraction, altruism and aggression, attribution and social cognition, social influence, group dynamics, and social motivation.
www.uta.edu /psychology/courses/grad_courses.htm   (854 words)

  
 imprinting in Credit card machines at Machines.Coderdir.com. Page 1   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Imprinting may mean: Imprinting (genetics) Imprinting (psychology), in psychology and...
Imprinting and the Epigenetic Asymmetry Between Parental Genomes -- Ferguson-Smith and Surani 293 (5532): 1086 --...
CII provides transfer pad imprinting services exclusively to the medical device industry.CII is ISO 9002 certified and operates in a 20,000 sf clean, environmentally-controlled production facility.
machines.coderdir.com /Credit%20card%20machines/imprinting   (352 words)

  
 Severe Disorders
The lack of one imprint may be partially compensated for, even by the parent or instance having produced the defect in the first place, or worsened by repetitive attacks.
The call for imprinting is very obvious, and the instinctual response to the call is also very obvious, but one has to be aware not to impede the natural functioning of the instincts in the father and mother.
The father imprint is got on the father's side by the shock of birth, of getting a child full of vitality in his own hands, suddenly connecting the strong emotional fact with his own participation in procreation some 9 months earlier, or in the whole life with his consort on a more general plane.
www.structuralpsy.org /Pages/Disorders.html   (5199 words)

  
 GEM-SET
Konrad Lorenz coined the phrase "imprinting" when describing the way newborn goslings identify the first object that moves past them after hatching, then follow that object everywhere it goes.
Generally speaking, most goslings imprint on their mothers, who then lead by example while the goslings follow and mimic her behaviors.
In short, imprinting is a genetically programmed response and learning through imprinting is all about mimicking behavior.
www.uic.edu /orgs/gem-set/archive020812q1.htm   (1461 words)

  
 Sexual Obsessions
Dynamic psychology is the kind of psychology that explores the dynamics of the subjective factors of personality and the subconscious mind.
For the infant, imprinting centres primarily on emotion (together with desire) and the patterns of femininity in the mother and masculinity in the father.
The intensity of the obsession reflects the intensity of the imprinting.
discover-your-mind.co.uk /8k-obsessions.htm   (1353 words)

  
 Self-Imprinting and Chronic Illness
Imprinting is described commonly in psychology texts as behavior learned by following the example of another living entity, usually another person or group of persons.
She would adopt, in imprinted fashion, the reality which she was constantly exposed to and mandated to affirm.
imprinted associations was broken, the toxicity which her own body now held onto WOULD kill her, regardless of the accuracy and efforts to detoxify and rebuild her health.
www.earthtym.net /imprint-fam.htm   (8061 words)

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