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Topic: In Search of.


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 Search algorithm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Brute-force search or "naïve"/uninformed search algorithms use the simplest, most intuitive method of searching through the search space, whereas informed search algorithms use heuristics to apply knowledge about the structure of the search space to try to reduce the amount of time spent searching.
In computer science, a search algorithm, broadly speaking, is an algorithm that takes a problem as input and returns a solution to the problem, usually after evaluating a number of possible solutions.
This is a type of search which solves constraint satisfaction problems where, rather than looking for a path, the solution is simply a set of values assigned to a set of variables.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Search_algorithm   (960 words)

  
 Search algorithm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Brute-force search or "naïve"/uninformed search algorithms use the simplest, most intuitive method of searching through the search space, whereas informed search algorithms use heuristics to apply knowledge about the structure of the search space to try to reduce the amount of time spent searching.
This is a type of search which solves constraint satisfaction problems where, rather than looking for a path, the solution is simply a set of values assigned to a set of variables.
In computer science, a search algorithm, broadly speaking, is an algorithm that takes a problem as input and returns a solution to the problem, usually after evaluating a number of possible solutions.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Search_algorithm   (950 words)

  
 Combinatorial search - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Combinatorial search algorithms solve instances of problems that are believed to be hard in general, by exploring the usually-large solution space of these instances.
Combinatorial search is a branch of computer science that sits at the intersection of several fields, including artificial intelligence, mathematics and software engineering.
Combinatorial search algorithms are normally implemented in an efficient imperative programming language, in an expressive declarative programming language such as Prolog, or some compromise, perhaps a functional programming language such as LISP or Haskell.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Combinatorial_search   (950 words)

  
 Search algorithm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Brute-force search or "naïve"/uninformed search algorithms use the simplest, most intuitive method of searching through the search space, whereas informed search algorithms use heuristics to apply knowledge about the structure of the search space to try to reduce the amount of time spent searching.
This is a type of search which solves constraint satisfaction problems where, rather than looking for a path, the solution is simply a set of values assigned to a set of variables.
In computer science, a search algorithm, broadly speaking, is an algorithm that takes a problem as input and returns a solution to the problem, usually after evaluating a number of possible solutions.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Search_algorithm   (950 words)

  
 Tabu search - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tabu search is a mathematical optimization method, belonging to the class of local search techniques.
To explore regions of the search space that would be left unexplored by the local search procedure and---by doing this---escape local optimality, tabu search modifies the neighbourhood structure of each solution as the search progresses.
Tabu search uses a local or neighbourhood search procedure to iteratively move from a solution x to a solution x' in the neighbourhood of x, until some stopping criterion has been satisfied.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tabu_search   (623 words)

  
 Binary search tree - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A splay tree is a binary search tree that automatically moves frequently accessed elements nearer to the root.
Searching a binary tree for a specific value is a recursive process that we can perform due to the ordering it imposes.
Once the binary search tree has been created, its elements can be retrieved in order by recursively traversing the left subtree, visiting the root, then recursively traversing the right subtree.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Binary_search_tree   (1097 words)

  
 Search warrant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A search warrant is a written warrant issued by a judge or magistrate which authorizes the police to conduct a search of a person or location for evidence of a criminal offense.
All jurisdictions with a rule of law and a right to privacy put constraints on the rights of police investigators, and typically require search warrants, or an equivalent procedure, for searches within a criminal enquiry.
Each of the state laws governing the issuance of search warrants.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Search_warrant   (344 words)

  
 Binary search tree - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
AVL trees and red-black trees are both forms of self-balancing binary search trees.
A splay tree is a binary search tree that automatically moves frequently accessed elements nearer to the root.
Once the binary search tree has been created, its elements can be retrieved in order by recursively traversing the left subtree, visiting the root, then recursively traversing the right subtree.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Binary_search_tree   (1088 words)

  
 Search algorithm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Brute-force search or "naïve"/uninformed search algorithms use the simplest, most intuitive method of searching through the search space, whereas informed search algorithms use heuristics to apply knowledge about the structure of the search space to try to reduce the amount of time spent searching.
This is a type of search which solves constraint satisfaction problems where, rather than looking for a path, the solution is simply a set of values assigned to a set of variables.
This is significantly better than linear search for large lists of data, but it requires that the list be sorted before searching (see sort algorithm) and also be random access.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Search_algorithm   (1030 words)

  
 A* search algorithm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Accordingly, A* considers the fewest nodes of any admissible search algorithm that uses a no more accurate heuristic estimate.
In computer science, A* (pronounced "A star") is a graph search algorithm that finds a path from a given initial node to a given goal node (or one passing a given goal test).
The A* algorithm is therefore an example of best-first search.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/A-star_search_algorithm   (1113 words)

  
 Backtracking - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In implementing backtracking, it is common to keep a variable trail, to record the changes in the values of a particular variable.
Backtracking is used in the implementation of programming languages (like Planner and Prolog) and other areas such as text parsing.
Backtracking is similar to a depth-first search but uses even less space, keeping just one current solution state and updating it.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Backtracking   (1113 words)

  
 Search good - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Search goods are more subject to price competition, as consumers can easily verify the price of the product at other outlets and make sure that the products are comparable.
In a distinction originally due to Philip Nelson, a search good is contrasted with an experience good.
In economics, a search good is a product or service with features and characteristics easily observable before purchase.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Search_good   (1113 words)

  
 Interpolation search - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In reality, interpolations search is often no faster than binary search due to the complexity of the arithmetic calculations of approximating the indices.
On average the interpolation search makes about log(log(N)) comparisons (if the elements are uniformly distributed), where N is the number of elements to be searched.
This differs from the binary search, in that the binary search always divides the search space in half.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Interpolation_search   (186 words)

  
 Search engine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Most web search engines are commercial ventures supported by advertising revenue and, as a result, some employ the controversial practice of allowing advertisers to pay money to have their listings ranked higher in search results.
Search engines were also known as some of the brightest stars in the Internet investing frenzy that occurred in the late 1990s.
A recent enhancement to search engine technology is the addition of geocoding to the processing of the ingested documents.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Search_engine   (2261 words)

  
 Binary search - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
An example of binary search in action is a simple guessing game in which a player has to guess a positive integer selected by another player between 1 and N, using only questions answered with yes or no. Supposing N is 16 and the number 11 is selected, the game might proceed as follows.
The search begins by examining the value in the center of the list; because the values are sorted, it then knows whether the value occurs before or after the center value, and searches through the correct half in the same way.
In its simplest form, binary search assumes the data is sorted (usually by a sort algorithm) and takes advantage of that characteristic.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Binary_search   (895 words)

  
 Binary numeral system - Open Encyclopedia
The binary or base-two numeral system is a system for representing numbers in which a radix of two is used; that is, each digit in a binary numeral may have either of two different values.
A binary number can be represented by any sequence of bits (binary digits), which in turn may be represented by any mechanism capable of being in two mutually exclusive states.
The first known description of a binary numeral system was made by Pingala in his Chhandah-shastra, placed variously in the 5th century BC or the 2nd century BC.
open-encyclopedia.com /Binary_numeral_system   (2597 words)

  
 eyeball search - OneLook Dictionary Search
eyeball search : Free On-line Dictionary of Computing [ home, info ]
Tip: Click on the first link on a line below to go directly to a page where "eyeball search" is defined.
eyeball search : Dictionary.com [ home, info ]
www.onelook.com /cgi-bin/cgiwrap/bware/dofind.cgi?word=eyeball+search   (2597 words)

  
 Metasearch.com - The Original & Best Since 1995!
The original way to search the search engines, since 1995.
metasearch.com   (2597 words)

  
 Arrest warrant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
An arrest warrant is a warrant issued by a public officer which authorizes the arrest and detention of an individual.
Arrest warrants are issued by a judge or justice of the peace under section 83.29 of the Criminal Code.
Warrants are typically issued by courts but can also be issued by houses of Congress or other legislatures (via the call of the house motion) and other political entities.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Arrest_warrant   (371 words)

  
 Tabu - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tabu (also spelled tapu), a Polynesian cultural concept, from which the word taboo derives its usage.
This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tabu   (89 words)

  
 Strip search - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Thus bathing, which is a justifiable necessity, often allows a similar outcome to a strip search with less legal liability, being less actionable when applied to everyone entering a facility, as well as being less offensive to clients than requiring them to undergo what is overtly presented as a strip search.
In North America, civil lawsuits, as well as criminal code changes against strip searches have usually been successful when a person is strip-searched by someone of the other gender, especially in cases where a woman has been strip-searched by a male guard or guards.
Another legal issue is that of blanket strip searches, such as in jails where arrestees are routinely strip-searched prior to having been found guilty of any crime in a court of law.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Strip_search   (632 words)

  
 Search algorithm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Brute-force search or "naïve"/uninformed search algorithms use the simplest, most intuitive method of searching through the search space, whereas informed search algorithms use heuristics to apply knowledge about the structure of the search space to try to reduce the amount of time spent searching.
The drawback is that most search spaces are extremely large, and an uninformed search (especially of a tree) will only take a reasonable amount of time for small examples.
This is a type of search which solves constraint satisfaction problems where, rather than looking for a path, the solution is simply a set of values assigned to a set of variables.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Search_algorithm   (950 words)

  
 Sequential search - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In sequential search we start from the beginning of the list, scan down the list, until the desired key is found or we have reached the end of the end of the list.
In computer science, sequential search is a search algorithm for searching a set of unsorted data for a particular value.
A sequential search requires random access to the data being searched.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Sequential_search   (950 words)

  
 Google search - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"To google," as a verb, has come to mean, "to search for something on the internet." Google officials have discouraged this usage of the company's name out of fear of trademark dilution, as it could lead to their name becoming a genericized trademark.
In Google Talk Game, google searches are used to complete a beginning of a sentence with words, leading to amusing or interesting results.
Google is a search engine owned by Google, Inc. whose mission statement is to, "organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful." The largest search engine on the web, Google receives over 200 million queries each day through its various services.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Google_(search_engine)   (1933 words)

  
 Animation34.html
Interpolation search is an extension of the binary search.
To that end the difference of the first element of the interval (the smallest element) to the element to be searched is divided by the span of the interval values in relation to the interval length.
Multiplied with the interval boundaries that then is the interpolated position of the element to be searched.
www.animal.ahrgr.de /en/Animation34.html   (213 words)

  
 Combinatorial
Combinatorial search Combinatorial search is a branch of algorithms solve instances of problems that are believed to be...
Combinatorial enumeration Combinatorial enumeration is a subfield of combinatorics.
Combinatorial chemistry Combinatorial chemistry involves the synthesis of, the molecules and the selective testing of th...
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /topics/combinatorial.html   (213 words)

  
 Search
Combinatorial search Combinatorial search is a branch of algorithms solve instances of problems that are believed to be...
Linear search In search algorithm, also known as sequential search, that is suitable for searching a set of data for a p...
Search warrant A search warrant is a written search of a person or location for evidence of a criminal offense.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /topics/search.html   (213 words)

  
 eyeball search from FOLDOC
< jargon > (Or vgrep) To look for something in a mass of code or data with one's own native optical sensors, as opposed to using some sort of pattern matching software like grep or any other automated search tool.
Nearby terms: EXTRA « extranet « EXUG « eyeball search » EZ » ezd » e-zine
foldoc.doc.ic.ac.uk /foldoc/foldoc.cgi?eyeball+search   (213 words)

  
 On Web Searching, Search Engine Marketing and Optimization, by Pandia
Pandia has reviews of some of the best books on Internet searching and books and ebooks on search engine optimization and positioning.
Search Engine Marketing 101 is our new short and easy guide to search engine optimization and promotion.
Get Pandia Search World, our free weekly news update on Web searching and search engine optimization.
www.pandia.com   (213 words)

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