Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Inclusion body myositis


Related Topics
PHP

In the News (Wed 17 Jul 19)

  
  Inclusion Body Myositis Information Page: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is one of a group of muscle diseases known as the inflammatory myopathies, which are characterized by chronic muscle inflammation accompanied by muscle weakness.
The onset of muscle weakness in IBM is generally gradual (over months or years) and affects both proximal (close to the trunk of the body) and distal (further away from the trunk) muscles.
IBM is generally resistant to all therapies and its rate of progression appears to be unaffected by currently available treatments.
www.ninds.nih.gov /disorders/inclusion_body_myositis/inclusion_body_myositis.htm   (456 words)

  
  Inclusion body myositis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is an inflammatory muscle disease, characterized by slowly progressive wasting and weakness of the arms and legs.
Inclusions ("clumps" of material) are found inside the muscle fibers, these are associated with the build-up of several different abnormal proteins, including tau protein and beta amyloid.
IBM and polymyositis apparently involve different disease mechanisms than are seen in dermatomyositis.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Inclusion_body_myositis   (1629 words)

  
 IBM - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
IBM's success in the mid-1960s led to inquiries as to IBM antitrust violations by the U.S. Department of Justice, which filed a complaint for the case U.S. v.
IBM in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, on January 17, 1969.
IBM invented many of the core technologies used in all forms of computing, including the first hard disk drive and the Winchester hard disk drive, the cursor (on computer screens), Dynamic RAM (DRAM), the relational database, Thin Film recording heads, RISC architecture, and the floppy disk.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/ibm   (3932 words)

  
 NMDInfo.net - Disease Information .
Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is an inflammatory disorder seen chiefly in mature males that currently is thought to be autoimmune-mediated and acquired, althougth one in ten cases may be hereditary.
The diagnosis of inclusion body myositis is suspected in the presence of the history and examination compatible with a chronic acquired muscle disease.
Inclusion body myositis is often diagnosed in cases of polymyositis that are unresponsive to therapy.
www.nmdinfo.net /disease_deatails.php?id=48   (724 words)

  
 Inclusion Body Myositis
Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is an inflammatory muscle disease characterized by slow and relentlessly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy of the muscles.
In fact, IBM is often diagnosed in cases of polymyositis that are unresponsive to therapy.
IBM is generally resistant to all therapies, and its rate of progression also appears to be unaffected by the present treatments.
healthlink.mcw.edu /article/921770542.html   (292 words)

  
 Inclusion Body Myositis Information on Healthline
Inclusion body myositis affects both proximal (closest to the center of the body) and distal (farthest from the center of the body) muscles.
The inclusion bodies are now recognized to contain abnormal deposits of amyloid proteins, similar to those found in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease.
IBM is thought to account for approximately 15–20% of all cases of inflammatory myositis in the United States.
www.healthline.com /galecontent/inclusion-body-myositis   (869 words)

  
 ipedia.com: IBM Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
IBM's success in the mid-1960s led to enquiries as to IBM antitrust violations by the U.S. Department of Justice, which filed a complaint for the case U.S. v.
IBM Japan is one of the successful few foreign companies in the Japanese market; the other major players are General Electric and Boeing.
IBM invented many of the core technologies used in all forms of computing, including the first hard disk drive and the Winchester hard disk drive, the cursor (on computer screens), Dynamic RAM (DRAM), the Relational database, Thin Film recording heads, RISC architecture, the Scanning Tunneling Microscope, and the floppy disk.
www.ipedia.com /ibm.html   (1434 words)

  
 MDA Research | Inclusion Body Myositis FAQ
IBM is a slowly progressive inflammatory and degenerative muscle disease that causes painless weakening of specific limb and extremity muscles.
IBM is the most common muscle disease in those over 50, and patients over age 50 who develop a pure form of PM are rare.
Because this disorder is genetic and isn't accompanied by inflammation, it has been labeled inclusion body "myopathy" rather than "myositis." H-IBMs are covered by MDA under the larger category of "distal muscular dystrophies," although these disorders may cause muscle weakness in both distal (away from the trunk) and proximal (near and of the trunk) muscles.
www.mda.org /research/ibmfaq.html   (878 words)

  
 Baylor Neurology Case of the Month
The muscle biopsy, however, demonstrated myopathic alterations with inflammatory foci, rimmed vacuoles, inclusions which stained for amyloid, and ragged red fibers, all of which were diagnostic of inclusion body myositis.
The term inclusion body myositis was coined in 1971 to describe patients with chronic polymyositis that also had muscle inclusions.
Within the vacuolated muscle fibers of IBM, there are abnormal accumulations of prion protein, acetylcholine receptor, and proteins that are typically found in Alzheimer brain (ß-amyloid, N-terminal and C-terminal epitopes of ß-amyloid precursor protein, alpha 1 antichymotrypsin, phosphorylated tau, apolipoprotein E, and ubiquitin).
www.bcm.edu /neurol/challeng/pat6/summary.html   (1022 words)

  
 Polymyositis, Dermatomyositis and Inclusion Body Myositis
Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is an inflammatory and degenerative muscle disease that causes painless weakening of muscles.
IBM progresses slowly and is sometimes misdiagnosed as treatment-resistant polymyositis, another inflammatory muscle disease that causes muscle weakness.
IBM occurs more frequently in men than in women, and is the most common muscle disease in people aged 50 and older.
www.clevelandclinic.org /health/health-info/docs/3600/3666.asp?index=12053   (1329 words)

  
 Myositis, Inclusion Body - AOL Health
Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is a rare inflammatory muscular disorder that usually becomes apparent during adulthood.
Inclusion body myositis frequently is diagnosed when a patient is unresponsive to therapy prescribed for polymyositis.
IBM is characterized by the gradual onset (over months or years) of muscle fatigue and weakness; a clear tendency to strike men more frequently than women; and affecting both the muscles closest to the body’s trunk (proximal) and those farthest from the trunk (distal).
www.aolhealth.com /conditions/myositis-inclusion-body   (551 words)

  
 Today@UCI: Press Releases:
The UCI research focuses on inclusion body myositis, a form of the disease that causes damage to muscle fibers and ultimately leads to loss of muscle tissue, particularly in the limbs.
Inclusion body myositis is a relatively new disorder that was first recognized in the early 1970s.
Muscle biopsies revealed the pathological features of inclusion body myositis, such as muscle degeneration and inflammation, which is consistent with how the disease progresses in human muscle.
today.uci.edu /news/release_detail.asp?key=184   (735 words)

  
 Responses - Inclusion-Body Myositis   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The theory behind this is that some myositis patients have a hidden, small cancer that their immune system is reacting to and that, in the process, the immune system also attacks their muscles or the blood vessels that go to their muscles.
Jonathan M. Goldstein, M.D., MDA Clinic Director, Yale University, New Haven, CT Inclusion-body myositis (IBM) is a disorder of muscle that affects particular muscles in the arms and thighs and is not responsive to typical therapy for other myositis.
There are reports of MRI of forearm muscles as a diagnostic aid for inclusion body myositis, because of differential involvement of forearm muscles in this disease, Again this is an adjunctive test, and muscle biopsy is still necessary for definitive diagnosis.
www.mdausa.org /experts/viewall.cfm?id=102   (6177 words)

  
 CIGNA - Myositis, Inclusion Body
Inclusion body myositis is characterized by a distinct, progressive muscle weakness of the proximal and distal muscles of the arms and legs.
Inclusion body myositis seems to be a distinct type of inflammatory muscle disease.
Inclusion Body Myositis occurs primarily in individuals greater than the age of 30 with the average age of onset being 53.
www.cigna.com /healthinfo/nord649.html   (1932 words)

  
 The role of quantitative electromyography in inclusion body myositis -- Brannagan et al. 63 (6): 776 -- Journal of ...
Inclusion body myositis is said to have both myopathic and neurogenic features on electrophysiological tests.
Inclusion body myositis is a chronic inflammatory myopathy, clinically characterised by both proximal and distal limb weakness
Inclusion body myositis: a corticosteroid-resistant idiopathic inflammatory myopathy.
jnnp.bmjjournals.com /cgi/content/full/63/6/776   (1484 words)

  
 Myositis Support Group
Inclusion Body Myositis has a prevalence of 35.3 per million of the population and is considered to represent 17-30% of the inflammatory myopathies though this figure may be nearer to 70%.
The majority of IBM patients once seen in the clinic for the first time can date back their muscle symptoms for at least one or two years however as the muscle weakness is often gradual it is difficult to define onset.
IBM is slower in progression and the sufferer displays distal as well as proximal weakness.
www.myositis.org.uk /archives5.htm   (680 words)

  
 A case of inclusion body myositis with benign monoclonal gammopathy successfully responding to repeated ...
A case of inclusion body myositis with benign monoclonal gammopathy successfully responding to repeated immunoabsorption -- Nakayama et al.
Inclusion body myositis is a common acquired myopathy in patients older than 50.
Inclusion bosy myositis and paraproteinemia: incidence and immunopathologic correlations.
jnnp.bmjjournals.com /cgi/content/full/68/2/230   (1128 words)

  
 An Overview of Inclusion Body Myositis.
IBM is a very complex disease with several different major effects on the muscle cells that have, so far, stymied researchers trying to understand what causes it or how it develops.
Not all of the muscles in the body are affected, for example, the heart is not affected nor are the muscles in the digestive track (these muscles are of a slightly different type).
Pain is not usually considered a symptom of IBM, however, most IBM patients report frequent, severe pain (usually in the thighs) and the changes in muscle structure and function can cause a lot of soreness and stiffness in the body, especially in the joints.
members.shaw.ca /btillieribm/essay.htm   (4034 words)

  
 Nature Clinical Practice Neurology | Sporadic inclusion body myositis[mdash]diagnosis, pathogenesis and therapeutic ...
Sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) presents with a characteristic clinical phenotype of slow-onset weakness and atrophy, affecting proximal and distal limb muscles and facial and pharyngeal muscles.
(1997) Inclusion body myositis and paraproteinemia: incidence and immunopathologic correlations.
Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia is caused by mutant valosin-containing protein
www.nature.com /ncpneuro/journal/v2/n8/full/ncpneuro0261.html   (5715 words)

  
 Inclusion Body Myositis - WrongDiagnosis.com
Inclusion Body Myositis: Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is an inflammatory muscle disease characterized by slow and relentlessly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy of the muscles.
Prognosis for Inclusion Body Myositis: IBM is generally resistant to all therapies, and its rate of progression also appears to be unaffected by the present treatments.
Inclusion Body Myositis is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
www.wrongdiagnosis.com /i/inclusion_body_myositis/intro.htm   (764 words)

  
 Prion disease
Inclusion body myositis (IBM), a sporadic inflammatory myopathy, is the most frequently occurring progressive myopathy in adults older than 55 years.
Sporadic inclusion body myositis and the hereditary inclusion body myopathies are severe, progressive muscle diseases, characterized pathologically by vacuolated muscle fibers containing paired helical filaments.
Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies: inclusion-body myositis, polymyositis, and dermatomyositis.
www.mad-cow.org /99feb_mid_sci.html   (9245 words)

  
 Biologia.fi - Forum - Inclusion body myositis   (Site not responding. Last check: )
There seems to be lots of articles and resources on IBM on the net, but my first look left me with the feeling there is lots of contradicting evidence and "unanswered questions" on the cause of the disease.
Faulty PrP Sc conformations may enter the body through consumption of scrapie-infected cells or are produced as a consequence of mutations in the gene encoding normal PrP C. In humans, mutations within the Human PrP gene cause Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease, and Fatal Fetal Insomnia (DebBurman et al., 1997).
IBM fibrils probably have several "break points" since 6-10 nm and 10-18 nm fibrils (if memory serves) are mentioned.
www.kixxer.com /bioforum/forum/showthread.php?s=0dd6df07d1ae3d4a4e21c2b2de94c79f&t=59   (2814 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.