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Topic: Indo-Aryan languages


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 Indo-Aryan languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This Indo-Aryan language is a combination of Persian and Arabic in its vocabulary with the grammar of the local dialects.
The earliest attestations of the group are in Vedic Sanskrit, the language used in the oldest scriptures of India, the foundational canon of Hinduism known as the Vedas.
However, although this preserved the integrity of written language for a long time, the spoken language continues to evolve, and by the sixth century, Sanskrit as a spoken language was rare, being by and large replaced by its descendants, the Prakrits.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Indic   (592 words)

  
 Richard Strand's Nuristân Site: Indo-Aryan-Speaking Peoples of the Hindu Kush
The remainder of the Indo-Aryan languages are located to the east and south.
The table of languages presented in Strand 1973 (p.302) suffered from an unfortunate lapse in the editor's responsibility to correct the numerous typographical errors that appeared in the page proofs of that article.
It is not used in the modern languages of the region.
users.sedona.net /~strand/IndoAryan/IndoAryas.html   (1896 words)

  
 India - Languages of India
Languages entering South Asia were "Indianized." Scholars cite the presence of retroflex consonants, characteristic structures in verb formations, and a significant amount of vocabulary in Sanskrit with Dravidian or Austroasiatic origin as indications of mutual borrowing, influences, and counterinfluences.
In spite of the profound influence of the Sanskrit language and Sanskritic culture on the Dravidian languages, a strong consciousness of the distinctness of Dravidian languages from Sanskrit remained.
The oldest documented Dravidian language is Tamil, with a substantial body of literature, particularly the Cankam poetry, going back to the first century A.D. Kannada and Telugu developed extensive bodies of literature after the sixth century, while Malayalam split from Tamil as a literary language by the twelfth century.
countrystudies.us /india/64.htm   (849 words)

  
 Who were Illyrians
As literary languages, the Indo-Iranian languages were used in the texts of some of the world's great religions: Indo-Aryan for Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism, and Iranian for Zoroastrian and Manichaean texts.
Old Persian was the administrative language of the early Achaemenian dynasty dating from the 6th century BC; and an eastern Middle Indo-Aryan dialect was the language of the chancellery of the Mauryan emperor Ashoka in India in the mid-3rd century BC.
The principal language of the Italic group is Latin, originally the speech of the city of Rome and the ancestor of the modern Romance languages: Italian, Romanian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, etc. The earliest Latin inscriptions apparently date from the 6th century BC, with literature beginning in the 3rd century.
www.geocities.com /iliria1   (15583 words)

  
 Richard Strand's Nuristân Site: Phonological Processes on the Indo-Iranian Frontier
In this region the westernmost of the Indo-Aryan languages remain surrounded within the southern watershed of the Hindu-Kush by eastward intrusions of Iranian speakers to the north and south.
The intervals are narrowest in the Southern Group of the Nuristâni languages, the group with historically longer proximity to the Indo-Aryan languages.
the Indo-Aryan languages BhaT'e-sa zib, Ušuj'u, the Açharêtâ' (Palôlâ') dialect of SiNâ' ("Shina"), Khow`ar, Kal'aSa-mandr/mun, and Gahwâr-b'âti,
users.sedona.net /~strand/Phonology/IIFproc.html   (1409 words)

  
 Indo-Aryan languages in Assam
Other Indo-Aryan languages spoken in Assam is Bangla followed by a thin sprinkling of Nepali speakers.
Bishnupriya Manipuri (an Indo Aryan language) is spoken primarily in the districts of Cachar in the Barak valley.
It has its roots in the Apabhramsa dialects developed from Magadhi Prakrit of the eastern group of Sanskritic languages.
www.iitg.ernet.in /rcilts/indo_as.html   (490 words)

  
 Verbix -- Misc languages: Indo-Aryan: conjugate Hindi verbs
Verbix -- Misc languages: Indo-Aryan: conjugate Hindi verbs
Hindi is a New Indo-Aryan language, spoken by as many as 225 million people in India.
Several millions speak it as a second language.
www.verbix.com /languages/hindi.shtml   (58 words)

  
 "Knowing" Words in Indo-European Languages
The exceptions are the languages of the Dravidian group, largely spoken in the south.
This is also used with some modern languages, like Hindi, and is the source for many more, including the alphabets for Burmese, Thai, and Cambodian.
These new spoken languages are called "Prakrits," from Prâkr.ta, "natural," "ordinary," "common," "vulgar." The first examples of written Prakrit words are in Sanskrit texts where someone is speaking, e.g.
www.friesian.com /cognates.htm   (2865 words)

  
 Indo-Aryan Languages
The vocabulary of the Purbi or Eastern Indo-Aryan Languages is, as with all languages of the Indo-Aryan family, heavily based on Sanskrit.
These languages of this category are considered the `purest' descendants of Sanskrit, being spoken in Aryavarta, the `pure land of the Aryans', also known as Aryadesha or Madhyadesha.
Of these, the languages in the first two categories are extinct (dead), while Sanskrit has been preserved as the sacred language of the Vedas and other sciptures sacred to the Aryan Vishnuite religion.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Ithaca/1335/Lang/prakrit.html   (3044 words)

  
 Ergativity in Indo-Aryan
The Sanskrit instrumental case marker is not the ancestor of the ergative in most of the modern Indo-Aryan languages and the true ancestor of modern forms such as ne/ni or le remains to be identified conclusively.
While most Indo-Aryan languages appear to follow this pattern by disallowing agreement with a non-nominative argument, some languages allow it.
However, most languages are morphologically ergative in that pieces of the morphology serve to mark the ergative or active pattern.
www.stanford.edu /~adeo/ia-erg.html   (3275 words)

  
 A typology of counterfactual marking in Modern Indo-Aryan languages
A typology of counterfactual marking in Modern Indo-Aryan languages
The imperfective participle is an ingredient of the morphology in counterfactuals in many modern Indo-Aryan language.
If a language uses periphrastic tense markers with the imperfective participle to form the present/past habitual, it does not use them to form the counterfactual.
www.ling.upenn.edu /sassn/6/node54.html   (155 words)

  
 List of Eastern Indo-Aryan languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Eastern Indo-Aryan languages include some 210 (SIL estimate) languages and dialects spoken by about many people in Asia; this language family is a part of the Indo-Aryan language family.
The following languages have not been sorted into subgroups within the Eastern Indo-Aryan language family.
Each subfamily in this list contains subgroups and individual languages.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/List_of_Bihari_languages   (107 words)

  
 The Origin and Development of the Bengali Language
The first systematic and detailed history of Bengali—a modern Indo-Aryan language-by an Indian scholar, it is an invaluable contribution to the scientific study of the modern Indo-Aryan Languages as a whole and is a landmark in the history of philological researches into Indian languages.
It is the first systematic and detailed history of Bengali—a modern Indo-Aryan language-by an Indian scholar, and incidentally, as it is comparative in its treatment, taking into consideration the philology of other Indo-Aryan languages, it is an invaluable contribution to the scientific study of the modern Indo-Aryan Languages as a whole.
One of the principal languages of India, which is rich with a fine literature which preserves a certain unsophisticated character, which is spoken in one of the largest towns of the world, and which is special problems because of its position in the extreme East of the Aryan world, has now been acquired by science.
www.indiaclub.com /html/9382.htm   (372 words)

  
 Siraiki language
It is supposed that it is an Indo-Aryan language, although this is disputed.
Siraiki shows resemblance to both Sindhi and Punjabi languages.
Siraiki is an old language mostly spoken in central Pakistan.
www.1bx.com /en/Siraiki.htm   (127 words)

  
 Indo-Aryan
Indian Epigraphy: A Guide to the Study of Inscriptions in Sanskrit, Prakrit, and Other Indo-Aryan Languages.(Review) (The Journal of the American Oriental Society)
Aryan - Aryan, [Sanskrit,=noble], term formerly used to designate the Indo-European race or language...
Indo-Iranian - Indo-Iranian, subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages, spoken by more than a billion...
www.infoplease.com /ce6/society/A0825143.html   (124 words)

  
 Konkani language resources
What are the most spoken languages on earth?
Konkani (official language of Goa) Maithili (official language of Bihar) Malayalam (official language of Kerala and Lakshadweep) Manipuri (Meithei) (official language of Manipur) Marathi (official language of...
After the agitation ended in 1987, a complex formula grants 'official language' status to Konkani, while Marathi is also allowed to be used "for any or all official purposes." Given the bitter rivalry...
www.mongabay.com /indigenous_ethnicities/languages/languages/Konkani.html   (1629 words)

  
 Amazon.co.uk: The Indo-Aryan Languages (Curzon Language Family S.): Books
The Indo-Aryan languages, spoken by at least 700 million people in the Republic of India, in Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, the Maldives, and in countries where immigrants from South Asia have settled, are a major group within the Indo-European family.
The Indo-Aryan languages, spoken by at least 700 million people in the Republic of India, in Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, the Maldive Islands, and in countries where immigrants from South Asia have settled, constitute a major group within the Indo-European family.
Major features of Indo-Aryan languages have been described before, but there is a need for a synoptic treatment of these languages.
www.amazon.co.uk /exec/obidos/ASIN/0700711309   (500 words)

  
 A comparative and etymological dictionary of the Nepali language: With indexes of all words quoted from other Indo-Aryan languages
A comparative and etymological dictionary of the Nepali language: With indexes of all words quoted from other Indo-Aryan languages
No part of this publication may be stored, transmitted, retransmitted, lent, or reproduced in any form or medium without the permission of the School of Oriental and African Studies, London University.
A comparative and etymological dictionary of the Nepali language includes Devanagari and roman alphabets.
dsal.uchicago.edu /dictionaries/turner   (187 words)

  
 Indian Epigraphy -- A Guide to the Study of Inscriptions in Sanskrit, Prakrit, and the Other Indo-Aryan Languages -- Richard Salomon
Richard Salomon surveys the entire corpus of Indo-Aryan inscriptions in terms of their contents, languages, scripts, and historical and cultural significance.
This book provides a general survey of all the inscriptional material in the Sanskrit, Prakrit, and modern Indo-Aryan languages, including donative, dedicatory, panegyric, ritual, and literary texts carved on stone, metal, and other materials.
A Guide to the Study of Inscriptions in Sanskrit, Prakrit, and the Other Indo-Aryan Languages
www.frontlist.com /detail/0195099842   (207 words)

  
 On Indo-aryan languages
"The Emergence of Perfective Aspect in Indo-Aryan Languages." Elizabeth Closs Traugott and Bernd Heine (eds.), Approaches to Grammaticalization.
"Aspectual Elements of Simultaneity and Iteration in Indian Languages: A Case for an Areal Universal." Studies in the Linguistic Sciences 17.1-14.
Presented at the Eighth South Asian Languages Analysis Roundtable, University of Illinois, May 1986.
www.scar.utoronto.ca /~binnick/TENSE/IndoArya.html   (89 words)

  
 Substratums in Indo-Aryan Languages
On 26-Feb-2004, worrylesswarrior(at)yahoo.com (Nirvana) <34e36f1b.0402260526.3e7a8ba2(at)=: = Hello, which of the Indo-Aryan languages has the most = 1.
The position of the Dardic languages, which include Kashmiri, is debated, They are undoubtedly part of Indo-Iranian.
It is Indo-Iranian family of languages, but its subset is Dardic, along with Nuristani.
www.scienceone.net /new-1906648-4250.html   (936 words)

  
 Languages
Caddoan languages The Caddoan languages are a Nebraska.
Aymaran languages The Aymaran languages are a Argentina.
Semitic languages The Semitic languages are the northeastern subfamily of the Asia.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /topics/languages.html   (936 words)

  
 Urdu language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Urdu is a member of the Hindustani group of languages, which is a subgroup of the Indo Aryan group of languages, which is in turn part of the Indo European family of languages.
Urdu is one of the official languages of India, and while the government school system emphasizes Hindi, many universities, especially in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, continue to foster Urdu as a language of prestige and learning.
A continuous progression is seen in linguistic development from Sanskrit down to the modern languages of Northern India though there is a very strong link between the Prakritic language 'Hindvi' of the middle ages and Urdu of today.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Urdu_language   (936 words)

  
 BookkooB : Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages - R. L Turner : Compare Book Prices
Above you will see price and availability details for Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages: Addenda and Corrigenda by R. L Turner from the leading UK book stores.
View other editions of Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages.
Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages: Addenda and Corrigenda
www.bookkoob.co.uk /book/0836413946.htm   (286 words)

  
 Table of contents for Library of Congress control number 88037096
Table of contents for The Indo-Aryan languages / Colin P. Masica.
Library of Congress subject headings for this publication: Indo-Aryan languages
Syntax Appendix I Inventory of NIA languages and dialects Appendix II Schemes of NIA subclassification.
www.loc.gov /catdir/toc/cam028/88037096.html   (84 words)

  
 The Indo-Aryan Languages (Cambridge Language Surveys) : Book
In his ambitious survey of the Indo-Aryan languages, Masica has provided a fundamental, comparative introduction that will interest not only general and theoretical linguists but also students of one or more languages (Hindi, Urdu, Bengali, Punjabi, Gujurati, Marathi, Sinhalese, etc.) who want to acquaint themselves with the broader linguistic context.
Click the following link to view the cover of The Indo-Aryan Languages (Cambridge Language Surveys).
The Indo-Aryan Languages (Cambridge Language Surveys) Reference Book.
www.pagenation.com /an/0521299446.html   (209 words)

  
 Comparative dictionary of the Indo Aryan languages :: Comparative dictionary of the Indo Aryan languages books, reviews and more
RL Turner "Comparative dictionary of the Indo Aryan languages".
Featured: Comparative dictionary of the Indo Aryan languages - RL Turner.
Comparative dictionary of the Indo Aryan languages :: Comparative dictionary of the Indo Aryan languages books, reviews and more
www.sciencefictionclassics.com /363768rl_turner.html   (216 words)

  
 Cardona, George: Indo-Aryan languages - LanguageServer - University of Graz
Cardona, George: Indo-Aryan languages - LanguageServer - University of Graz
In collection: Comrie, Bernard (ed.) (ed.), The major languages of South Asia, the Middle East and Africa.
languageserver.uni-graz.at /ls/art?id=18   (27 words)

  
 Category:Indo-European languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Indo-European languages include some 443 ( SIL estimate) languages and dialects spoken by about three billion people, including most of the major language families of Europe and western Asia, which belong to a single superfamily.
This page was last modified 12:11, 1 Jan 2005.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Category:Indo-European_languages   (27 words)

  
 Ethnologue report for India
Dialects: No intelligibility of any Tibeto-Burman languages of Lahul-Spiti and Kinnaur (Chauhan).
Andhra Pradesh, Adilabad District; Maharashtra, southern Yavatmal, southern Chandrapur and southeastern Garhchiroli districts.
Southern coastal strip of Maharashtra, primarily in the districts of Ratnagari and Goa; Karnataka; Kerala.
www.ethnologue.com /show_country.asp?name=India   (27 words)

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