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Topic: Infinitive


  
  Infinitive - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The bare infinitive is the dictionary form of a verb, and is generally the form of a verb that receives a definition; however, the definition itself generally uses a to-infinitive.
The bare infinitive form is also the present subjunctive form and the imperative form, although most grammarians do not consider uses of the present subjunctive or imperative to be uses of the bare infinitive.
Afrikaans has lost the distinction between the infinitive and present forms of verbs, with the exception of the verbs "wees" (to be), which admits the present form "is", and the verb "hĂȘ" (to have), whose present form is "het".
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Infinitive#Bare_infinitive   (1869 words)

  
 Split infinitive - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A split infinitive is a grammatical construction in the English language where a word or phrase, usually an adverb or adverbial phrase, occurs between the marker to and the bare infinitive (uninflected) form of the verb.
Romance languages, on the other hand, do separate infinitives from their prepositions, though grammarians of those languages do not normally use the term "split infinitive" to describe the phenomenon, since the preposition is not considered a part of the uninflected infinitive form.
Grammatically, the prohibition of split infinitives was thought to be a nonsensical application of Latin grammar to a Germanic language.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Split_infinitive   (2149 words)

  
 Infinitive
By far the most common form of an infinitive in English language is with the preposition "to", such as in "to walk", "to cry", "to eat", "to fear".
Formation of the infinitive in Romance languages was borrowed from their ancestor, Latin, in which a significant majority of verbs had an infinitive ending with -re (with a varying vowel, called the thematical preceding it).
The infinitive construct is used much as an English infinitive, including being preceded by ל "to"; the infinitive absolute is used to add emphasis or certainty to the verb, as in מות ימות; "he shall indeed die".
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/in/Infinitive.html   (479 words)

  
 The infinitive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
a transitive) the infinitive is formed from the verbal noun with a preceding "a" and lenition of the verbal noun.
an intransitive) the infinitive is formed from the verbal noun with a preceding "a" and lenition of the verbal noun.
When the sentence has an object the infinitive is formed from the verbal noun with a preceding "a" and lenition of the verbal noun.
www.smo.uhi.ac.uk /~martainn/ag_ionnsachadh/infinitive.htm   (569 words)

  
 INFINITIVE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
That the Infinitive in Greek had its origin as respects both form and function in a verbal noun, and chiefly at least in the dative case of such a noun, is now regarded as an assured result of comparative grammar.
The Infinitive with the article in the genitive began to assume some such prominence as at a much earlier time the dative had acquired, and as before, the sense of its case being in some degree lost, this genitive Infinitive came to be used as a nominative or accusative.
From the earliest historic period of the Greek language the Infinitive partakes of the characteristics both of the verb and the noun.
www.dabar.org /BurtonMoodsTenses/INFINITIVE.html   (611 words)

  
 NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Split infinitive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
A split infinitive is a grammatical construction in the English language produced by inserting a word or phrase, usually an adverb or adverbial phrase, between to and a verb in its infinitive form.
Descriptively speaking, split infinitives are common in all varieties of informal English; however, their status as part of the standard language is controversial.
Split infinitives have been in use since the 13th century, although by the 16th Century they were rare in some of the most notable authors.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Split-infinitive   (632 words)

  
 split infinitive. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
The split infinitive has been present in English ever since the 14th century, but it was not until the 19th century that grammarians labeled and condemned the usage.
The thinking is that because the Latin infinitive is a single word, the equivalent English construction should be treated as if it were a single unit.
Infinitive phrases in which the adverb precedes a participle, such as to be rapidly rising, to be clearly understood, and to have been ruefully mistaken, are not split and should be acceptable to everybody.
www.bartleby.com /61/55/S0655500.html   (471 words)

  
 NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Infinitive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
It is called the "infinitive" because the verb is usually not made "finite", or limited by inflection.
The infinitive is often used as the "citation form", as for many languages this is the basic lemma form of a verb which is usually presented in dictionaries.
To form the first infinitive, the strong form of the root (without consonant gradation or epenthetic 'e') is used, and these changes occur: Consonant gradation is a linguistic term for the changing of consonants.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Infinitive   (3026 words)

  
 § 59. split infinitive. 1. Grammar. The American Heritage Book of English Usage. 1996
In fact, the split infinitive is distinguished both by its length of use and the greatness of its users.
Remember too that infinitive phrases in which the adverb precedes a participle, such as to be rapidly rising, to be clearly understood, and to have been ruefully mistaken, are not split and should be acceptable to everybody.
And don’t be deceived by to-constructions with a gerund, as in He is committed to laboriously assembling all of the facts of the case.
www.bartleby.com /64/C001/059.html   (609 words)

  
 Infinitive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In grammar the infinitive is the form of a verb that has no inflection to indicate person number mood or It is called the "infinitive" because the is usually not made "finite" or limited inflection.
By far the most common form of infinitive in English language is with the particle "to" such as in "to walk" cry" "to eat" "to fear".
Formation of the infinitive in Romance languages that of their ancestor Latin in which a significant majority of had an infinitive ending with -re (with a varying vowel called the thematical preceding it).
www.freeglossary.com /Infinitive   (1044 words)

  
 infinitive.html
The infinitive is a noun form of a verb.
Infinitives in indirect discourse are much more concrete as verbs than they are in the dative form I first mentioned.
The infinitive is a noun form of a verb that slowly turned back into a verb: the earliest form of the infinitive was as a subject or predicate nominative.
www.sas.upenn.edu /~struck/classes/latin309/syntax/infinitive.html   (682 words)

  
 Definition of Infinitive from dictionary.net
Infinitive mood (Gram.), that form of the verb which merely names the action, and performs the office of a verbal noun.
Note: In Anglo-Saxon, the simple infinitive was not preceded by to (the sign of modern simple infinitive), but it had a dative form (sometimes called the gerundial infinitive) which was preceded by to, and was chiefly employed in expressing purpose.
Note: The gerundial ending (-anne) not only took the same form as the simple infinitive (-an), but it was confounded with the present participle in -ende, or -inde (later -inge).
www.dictionary.net /infinitive   (179 words)

  
 vinf1: infinitive constructions
The infinitive is often used in impersonal expressions to avoid the subjunctive when a specific subject is not necessary.
The infinitive may be used in an interrogative phrase or exclamatory phrases to express a dilemma.
The infinitive of avoir or être plus the past participle of a verb is used after the preposition après to describe a preceding action in the past.
www.laits.utexas.edu /tex/gr/vinf1.html   (851 words)

  
 split infinitive
No split infinitives are to be found in the works of Shakespeare, Spenser, Pope, or Dryden, or in the King James Version of the Bible.
Phrases consisting of "to be" or "to have" followed by an adverb and a participle are *not* split infinitives, and constitute the natural word order.
The dispute is between those who believe that split infinitives should be avoided when this can be done with no sacrifice of clarity or naturalness, and those who believe that no effort whatever should be made to avoid them.
www.yaelf.com /aueFAQ/mifsplitinfinitive.shtml   (602 words)

  
 infinitive - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about infinitive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The infinitive form of the verb in English is always preceded by to.
The infinitive can be either the subject of a sentence (‘To win is my aim’) or the object (‘I want to win’).
The practice of splitting an infinitive (‘to boldly go’) is frowned on by many people, but there are occasions when it may be the best solution (‘a chance to really relax’; ‘the purpose of the training is to better equip those who failed’).
encyclopedia.farlex.com /infinitive   (196 words)

  
 The Infinitive
Important Note: Because an infinitive is not a verb, you cannot add -s, -es, -ed, or -ing to the end.
Infinitives can be used as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs.
The general rule is that no word should separate the to of an infinitive from the simple form of the verb that follows.
www.chompchomp.com /terms/infinitive.htm   (601 words)

  
 Greek infinitive & participle
The infinitive is used to indicate the purpose or goal of the action or state of its controlling verb.
An infinitive or an infinitive phrase sometimes functions as the subject of a finite verb.
This is the use of the infinitive (or infinitive phrase) after a verb perception or communication.
www.bcbsr.com /greek/gvbls.html   (1765 words)

  
 pre4: prepositions with infinitives
The infinitive is the verb form generally used after a preposition in French.
The infinitive may be used to complete the sense of an adjective or a pronoun.
The infinitive of avoir or être plus the past participle of a verb is used after the preposition après (after) to describe a preceding action in the past.
www.laits.utexas.edu /tex/gr/pre4.html   (501 words)

  
 Verbals: Gerunds, Participles, and Infinitives
An infinitive is a verbal consisting of the word to plus a verb (in its simplest "stem" form) and functioning as a noun, adjective, or adverb.
An Infinitive Phrase is a group of words consisting of an infinitive and the modifier(s) and/or (pro)noun(s) or noun phrase(s) that function as the actor(s), direct object(s), indirect object(s), or complement(s) of the action or state expressed in the infinitive, such as:
An infinitive is a verbal consisting of the word to plus a verb; it may be used as a noun, adjective, or adverb.
owl.english.purdue.edu /handouts/grammar/g_verbals.html   (2846 words)

  
 Infinitive
The infinitive is a simple word made out of the verb root.
It corresponds well with the English infinitive in translations, which is the word "to" followed by the verb.
Commands with respect are formed by replacing the final -அ of the infinitive with -ஆதீர்கள்.
www.unc.edu /~echeran/paadanool/unicode/lesson28.html   (274 words)

  
 factoids > English > split infinitive
These people betray by their practice that their aversion to the split infinitive springs not from instinctive good taste, but from tame acceptance of the misinterpreted opinion of others; for they will subject their sentences to the queerest distortions, all to escape imaginary split infinitives.
Those who presumably do know what split infinitives are, and condemn them, are not so easily identified, since they include all who neither commit the sin nor flounder about in saving themselves from it — all who combine a reasonable dexterity with acceptance of conventional rules But when the dexterity is lacking disaster follows.
When a man splits an infinitive, he may be doing it unconsciously as a member of our class 1, or he may be deliberately rejecting the trammels of convention and announcing that he means to do as he will with his own infinitives.
public.logica.com /~stepneys/cyc/s/split.htm   (1861 words)

  
 The Infinitive Phrase
When an infinitive phrase introduces a main clause, separate the two sentence components with a comma.
When an infinitive phrase breaks the flow of a main clause, use a comma both before and after the interrupter.
When an infinitive phrase concludes a main clause, you need no punctuation to connect the two sentence components.
www.chompchomp.com /terms/infinitivephrase.htm   (331 words)

  
 Is It Wrong to Split an Infinitive?
But in English, the infinitive form of the verb is usually accompanied by the particle "to": "to walk," "to run," "to think," "to feel," "to be." As a two-word unit, the infinitive in English almost begs to be split, at least sometimes.
Usually, there is no need to split an infinitive, and to do so gratuitously is just asking for trouble from the grammar police.
But if placing the infinitive's adverbial modifier either before or after the complete infinitive actually alters your intended meaning or makes it ambiguous, then by all means, go ahead and split the infinitive.
www.grammartips.homestead.com /splitinfinitive.html   (482 words)

  
 latin grammar historic infinitive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Latin I. Latin I reviews basic Latin grammar and continues with pronouns, formation of adverbs, infinitives, locative and vocative cases, and imperatives for five declensions and four conjugations.
subjunctive of alleged cause with quod historic infinitive.
usages the present active infinitive of the verb is employed...
www.english-megasite.com /articles/43/latin-grammar-historic-infinitive.html   (441 words)

  
 Grammar Guide -- GrammarStation.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
When the infinitive refers to the subject of the clause, it has an active meaning.
When two infinitives are joined by and, or, except, but, than, as or like, the second infinitive need not be preceded by to.
The split infinitive (ie the placing of a word, usually the adverb, between to and the verb) used to be considered improper.
www.grammarstation.com /servlet/GGuide?type=INFI   (686 words)

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