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Topic: Institute of Radio Engineers


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In the News (Tue 23 Apr 19)

  
  Institute of Radio Engineers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In the first half of the 20th century, radio communications has experienced great expansion, and the growing professional community of developers and operators of radio systems required standardization, research, and authoritative dissemination of new results among practitioners and researchers.
The IRE was a major participant in planning of the Federal Radio Commission (established 1927; later the Federal Communications Commission), and worked in close cooperation with the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, the Radio Manufacturers Association, the Radio and Television Manufacturers Association, and the National Television System Committees on Standards.
Until the early 1940s IRE was a relatively small engineering organization, but the growing importance of electrical communications and the emergence of the discipline of electronics in the 1940s have increased its appeal to practitioners.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Institute_of_Radio_Engineers   (455 words)

  
 American Institute of Electrical Engineers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The American Institute of Electrical Engineers was a United States based organization of electrical engineers that existed between 1884 and 1963 (when it merged with the Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE)).
Radio and wireless communications became the major focus of a rival organization, the Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE, established 1912).
The dynamic growth of radio technology and the emergence of the new discipline of Electronics in the 1940s led to stiff competition between AIEE and IRE, with IRE showing faster growth in the 1950s and early 1960s, and attracting more students.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/American_Institute_of_Electrical_Engineers   (417 words)

  
 United States Radio Development (1917)
The word "radio" came into marked use in place of "wireless" in 1907, and was officially adopted by The Institute of Radio Engineers in 1911 and shortly thereafter by the United States Government.
The sinking of the "Republic" and the use of radio caused the public to recognize that it was of value, and its subsequent use (as, for example, on the S. "Ohio," and lastly, with the "Titanic") made such an impression that Congress passed laws requiring and controlling radio.
The Institute of Radio Engineers, formed by the combining of the Society of Wireless Telegraph Engineers and the Wireless Institute, was developed in the former organizations, principally by the persistent efforts of a few individuals.
earlyradiohistory.us /1917dev.htm   (5502 words)

  
 Ham Radio and Radio Astronomy
Ships were equipped with radio, huge commercial stations were set up to handle intercontinental messages after the fashion of the telegraph companies, and many other uses were found for the new technology.
Thus, when the first government regulations were imposed on radio in 1912, the amateur operators ("hams"), whose interest in radio was personal and experimental, rather than commercial, got the short end of the stick.
Reber's radio astronomy work continued for a number of years, and his results were published in the Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, the Astrophysical Journal, Nature, and the Journal of Geophysical research.
www.nrao.edu /whatisra/hist_ham.shtml   (1070 words)

  
 Radio Astronomy Pioneer Dies
Reber was the first person to build a radio telescope dedicated to astronomy, opening up a whole new "window" on the Universe that eventually produced such landmark discoveries as quasars, pulsars and the remnant "afterglow" of the Big Bang.
Reber was a radio engineer and avid amateur "ham" radio operator in Wheaton, Illinois, in the 1930s when he read about Karl Jansky's 1932 discovery of natural radio emissions coming from outer space.
The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.
www.nrao.edu /pr/2002/reber   (590 words)

  
 History of the IEEE
As the membership of the Institute grew, efforts were made to increase the participation of those living in other parts of the country.
The Institute began successfully, but by 1912 membership had fallen to 27 from a high of 99, and Marriott's society was struggling to stay in existence.
In the years prior to World War I, maritime radio was the most important segment of the industry and coastal cities had the largest concentrations of radio engineers.
www.ieee.org /organizations/history_center/historical_articles/history_of_ieee.html   (2625 words)

  
 Laboratory Tests in High-Speed Production   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
He is a member of the Institute of Radio Engineers, the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, and the Radio Club of America.
Thorough and complete engineering analyses were made of every kind of material that was to go into the finished product, for it was to be the finest that human ingenuity could produce in order to be a worthy successor to a long line of musical instruments.
Engineering is by no means confined to the laboratory, for groups are continually in the field making performance tests of new models, working out problems of the merchandising organization, and keeping in touch with the activities and methods of other factories.
www.antiqueradios.com /features/highspeed.shtml   (1219 words)

  
 John Vincent Lawless Hogan - radio pioneer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
In 1912 he was instrumental in the formation of the Institute of Radio Engineers (by consolidating the Society of Wireless Telegraph Engineers with the Wireless Institute).
And in 1920 was elected president of the Institute of Radio Engineers.
The advent of home radio and radio broadcasting in1920 required a simple, one knob control for tuning in stations.
www.icce.rug.nl /~soundscapes/VOLUME02/John_Vincent_Lawless_Hogan.html   (514 words)

  
 Short History of the IEEE
IEEE in short is an organization formed by the consolidation of AIEE (American Institute of Electrical Engineers) and the IRE (Institute of Radio Engineers).
This growth in the technology and the planning for an international Electrical Exhibition to be held by the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia prompted twenty-five of America's most prominent electrical engineers, including Thomas Edison, Elihu Thomson and Edwin Houston, to issue a call for the formation of a society to promote their burgeoning discipline.
Electronics engineers tended to become members of the IRE, but the applications of electron tube technology became so extensive that the technical boundaries differentiating the IRE and the AIEE became difficult to distinguish.
www.comsoc.org /tomsk/en/publication/history.htm   (607 words)

  
 History of the EE Department - INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Glover had made a request to the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, one of the five Founder's Societies, for the establishment of a student branch at Cal Poly.
The much younger and less sophisticated organization, the Institute of Radio Engineers in 1947, organizing student branches for the first time (by now the AIEE had 126 student branches) invited the ELandR Department to organize a student branch.
The fact that this student's father was a middle management engineer with the company in Schenectady should not be overlooked.
www.ee.calpoly.edu /home/history/wra/wra18.html   (914 words)

  
 Zenith: About: Corporate History: Dr. Robert Adler
It was used by radio astronomers in the U.S. as well as abroad, and by the U.S. Air Force for long-range missile detection.
Dr. Adler's original work in the field of acousto-optical interaction was instrumental in the 1966 public demonstration, by a team of Zenith engineers, of an experimental television display using ultrasonic deflection and modulation of a laser beam to produce a wall-size TV picture without a cathode ray tube.
Adler is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
www.zenith.com /sub_about/about_adler.html   (720 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The institute of Radio Engineers grew out of the merger of two earlier organizations, the Society of Wireless Telegraph Engineers and the Wireless Institute.
A second attempt to form an organization of radio engineers was begun by Robert Marriott in 1908 and was clearly influenced by the success of the AIEE.
The members of the institute agreed from the beginning to publish papers and related discussions in a new publication, The Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, with the first issue in January 1913.
ieee.cincinnati.fuse.net /reiman/10_1989.html   (355 words)

  
 Zworykin, Vladimir
At the Petersburg Institute of Technology, Zworykin studied electrical engineering with Boris Rosing, who believed cathode ray tubes would be useful in television's development because they could shoot a steady stream of charged particles.
They included the Institute of Radio Engineers' Morris Liebmann Memorial prize in 1934; the American Institute of Electrical Engineers' highest honor in 1952, the Edison Medal; and the National Academy of Sciences' National Medial of Science in 1967.
National chair, Professional Group on Medical Electronics, Institute of Radio Engineers; founder and president, International Federation for Medical Electronics and Biological Engineering; officer of the Academy, French Ministry of Education; governor, International Institute for Medical Electronics and Biological Engineering, Paris.
www.museum.tv /archives/etv/Z/htmlZ/zworykinvla/zworykinvla.htm   (719 words)

  
 IEEE Communications Society - Chapters Manual
The "roots" of the IEEE Communications Society extend back to the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE) which was founded in 1884, and the Institute of Radio Engineers (IRE) which was formed in 1912.
Electronics engineering evolved from the radio field and expanded greatly during World War II, overlapping into the communications and (to a lesser extent) the power fields.
Methods were developed to foster cooperation and interchange of information among members of each of the original Institutes with their narrow common interests.
www.comsoc.org /socstr/documents/chapmanual/cm_1_2.html   (1563 words)

  
 IEEE UFFC Ultrasonics Home
The need for a professional organization to service a growing population of workers in the field of ultrasonics was promoted by a group of engineers and scientists whose dedication can be compared to that of a 19th century missionary movement.
The corrections to the minutes of the PGUE administrative committee meeting of June 25, 1955, states in part, "Considerable discussion was devoted to the question of whether the scope of interest includes the field of piezoelectric devices and their applications, for example, frequency control devices.
Near the close of 1963, the membership was asked to vote on a proposal to change the name from the Professional Group on Ultrasonic Engineering to the Professional Group on Sonics and Ultrasonics with a broadened definition of the scope of interest for the group.
www.ieee-uffc.org /ulmain.asp?page=ult97pa1   (5196 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
He is also a di- rector of the American Institute of Radio Engineers.
He is widely known for his active par- ticipation in the financial and busi- ness interests of the Institute, as well as in investment management, financial administration, and in- dustrial.
Snyder, born in 1907 in Find- lay, Ohio, was graduated from the Carnegie Institute of Techlology with the degree of bachelor of sci- ence in 1931 and from the gradu- ate School of Business Administra- tion, Harvard University, with the degree of master of business ad- ministration three years later.
www-tech.mit.edu /archives/VOL_071/TECH_V071_S0237_P005.txt   (1316 words)

  
 PA State Archives - MG-424 - Scope and Content Note - Harry Hauck Collection   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Born on April 11, 1897, Harry Houck of New Cumberland, Pennsylvania, was a significant contributor to the development of radio in the early twentieth century.
He was also an active member of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Institute of Radio Engineers, Engineers Club and The Radio Club of America.
Houck's outstanding contributions to the development of radio were recognized in 1941 when he was awarded the Edwin Armstrong Medal by The Radio Club of America's board of directors.
www.phmc.state.pa.us /bah/dam/mg/mg424.htm   (564 words)

  
 Union College IEEE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The IEEE and its forerunners, the AIEE (American Institute of Electrical Engineers) and the IRE (Institute of Radio Engineers), date to 1884.
At the international Electrical Exhibition to be held by the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia twenty-five of America's most prominent electrical engineers, including Thomas Edison, called for the formation of a society to promote their burgeoning discipline.
The IRE -- Wireless Communications Two largely local organizations -- the Society of Wireless and Telegraph Engineers and the Wireless Institute -- merged to form an international society for scientists and engineers involved in the development of wireless communications -- the Institute of Radio Engineers.
www.vu.union.edu /~ieee   (393 words)

  
 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers --¬† Encyclop√¶dia Britannica
international organization of engineers and scientists in electrical engineering, electronics, and allied fields, formed in 1963 by merger of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (founded 1884) and the Institute of Radio Engineers (founded 1912).
More results on "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers" when you join.
These societies publish technical journals, encourage engineering research, provide assistance to governments, hold meetings at which technical advances are presented, offer continuing education courses, and look after the technical welfare of their members.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9032290?tocId=9032290   (760 words)

  
 [No title]
Historians interested in the institutional basis of science and technology in wartime will be drawn to virtually complete records--including scarce or unpublished administrative histories and technical reports--stemming from Terman's role as director of the Harvard Radio Research Laboratory.
The Radio Research Laboratory (operating over Europe) was credited with saving many of the allied bombers, and Dr. Terman was decorated by both the American and British governments for his wartime efforts.
Terman was awarded the Lamme Medal for distinction in engineering education in 1964, and was elected to the A.S.E.E. Hall of Famein 1968.
www-sul.stanford.edu /depts/spc/xml/sc0160.xml   (7467 words)

  
 IEEE - History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
From its earliest origins, the IEEE has advanced the theory and application of electrotechnology and allied sciences, served as a catalyst for technological innovation and supported the needs of its members through a wide variety of programs and services.
On 13 May 1884, the AIEE was born in New York with the purpose to advance electrical power technologies and quickly gained recognition as a representative for American electrical engineers.
So IRE was founded in 1912 with the purpose to explore expanding radio and communications technology.
www.ewh.ieee.org /sb/iiee/new/ieee/history.html   (621 words)

  
 Info Age - A. Hoyt Taylor by Orrin Dunlap
Albert Hoyt Taylor, radio engineer, investigator of ethereal phenomena and pioneer in radar, was graduated in 1899 from Northwestern University with a B.S. degree.
As superintendent of the Radio Division of the United States Naval Research Laboratory, Anacostia, D.C., he studied polarization of electric waves, ‘round-the-earth echoes or multiple signals and the structure of the upper atmosphere.
Taylor, regarded as one of the government’s most skilled experts in radio research and engineering, was awarded the Liebmann Memorial Prize by the Institute of Radio Engineers in 1927 for his short-wave work and application of piezo crystals in transmitting circuits.
www.infoage.org /dunlap-ahtaylor.htm   (944 words)

  
 McDonald, Arthur Stephen - Bright Sparcs Biographical entry
During his long tenure at AWA Ltd., McDonald helped establish Australia’s broadcasting industry: he set up the construction of the first radio stations and helped establish the beam wireless service between Australia and Britain (1927) and the first commercial use of two-way radio telephone links to overseas.
McDonald was a foundation member of the Institution of Radio Engineers, Australia, a Fellow and one-time Vice-President of the Institute of Radio Engineers, United States of America and Vice-President of the Radio & Telephone manufacturers Association.
Radio Engineer with the Department of the Navy
www.asap.unimelb.edu.au /bsparcs/biogs/P001299b.htm   (276 words)

  
 An Introduction to John V. L. Hogan, Radio Pioneer - Bio
Hogan was deeply involved with radio when he wrote his book in 1922-23.
Hogan also discovered the "rectifier heterodyne." His associate, J. Lee, had observed some peculiar effects when a special transmitter was being operated while the station was receiving messages.
In 1912 he was instrumental in the formation of the Institute of Radio Engineers (by consolidating the Society of Wireless Telegraph Engineers with the Wireless Institute.) In 1913 he had charge of the acceptance tests of the U.S. Navy's first high powered station at Arlington.
www.eht.com /oldradio/history/outline/hoganbio.html   (633 words)

  
 Untitled Document   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
During the discussion of Yagi's paper, J. Howard Dellinger, of the U.S. Bureau of Standards, predicted that the paper would be regarded as a classic and that the principles disclosed by Yagi would serve as a guide for much future development.
Yagi was born in 1886 in Osaka, Japan, and graduated in engineering from Tokyo Imperial University in 1909.
In 1933 the short-wave system developed at Tohoku University was used to establish a government radio telephone link between Sakata and Tobishima Island, a distance of about 40 km.
ieee.cincinnati.fuse.net /reiman/05_2004.htm   (882 words)

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