Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Intel 286


Related Topics

  
  Intel Museum - Microprocessor Hall of Fame
Intel's first microprocessor, the 4004, ran at 108 kilohertz (108,000 hertz), compared to the Intel® Pentium®; 4 processor's initial speed of 1.5 gigahertz (1.5 billion hertz).
Intel Xeon processor-based workstations are expected to achieve performance increases between 30 and 90 percent over systems featuring Intel® Pentium®; III Xeon® processors depending on applications and configurations.
The Intel® Pentium®; M processor, the Intel® 855 chipset family, and the Intel® PRO/Wireless 2100 network connection are the three components of Intel® Centrino® processor technology.
www.intel.com /museum/online/hist_micro/hof/index.htm   (1181 words)

  
  Intel 80286 at AllExperts
The Intel 80286 (also called iAPX 286 in the Intel programmer's manual for the 286) is an x86-family 16-bit microprocessor that was introduced by Intel on February 1, 1982.
The 286 is able to address up to 16 MiB of RAM, in contrast to the 1 MiB the 8086 can work with.
The 286 was designed to run multitasking applications, including communications (such as automated PBXs), real-time process control, and multi-user systems.
en.allexperts.com /e/i/in/intel_80286.htm   (499 words)

  
  Intel 80286 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Intel 80286 (also called iAPX 286 in the Intel programmer's manual for the 286) is an x86-family 16-bit microprocessor that was introduced by Intel on February 1, 1982.
The 286 is able to address up to 16 MiB of RAM, in contrast to the 1 MiB the 8086 can work with.
The 286 was designed to run multitasking applications, including communications (such as automated PBXs), real-time process control, and multi-user systems.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Intel_80286   (450 words)

  
 Protected mode - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is sometimes abbreviated p-mode and also called Protected Virtual Address Mode in the Intel iAPX 286 Programmer's Reference Manual (iAPX 286 is just another name for the Intel 80286) even though a 32-bit "virtual address" mentioned in the manual was actually a far pointer and true 32-bit virtual addresses came with the Intel 80386.
The other operational mode of 286 and later CPUs is real mode, a backwards compatibility mode that disables these features, designed to allow old software to run on newer chips.
Even when protected mode is enabled on a 286 or 386, on PC compatibles, memory above 1 MB is not accessible due to memory wrap-around, a feature designed to mimic (now obsolete) 8086 and 80186 21-bit warparound to 20-bit.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Protected_mode   (1193 words)

  
 Intel 80286
The Intel 80286 (officially called iAPX 286) is a 16-bit microprocessor that allows up to 16 megabytes of RAM.
The Intel 8086 by contrast is only able to address 1 megabyte of RAM.
First released in 1982, the 286 was widely used in IBM PC compatible computers during the mid to late 1980s.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/in/Intel_80286.html   (74 words)

  
 [No title]
Intel 8086 and 8088 ------------------- The Intel 8086 was released on June 6, 1978.
Intel also dropped the memory addressing to a miserly 24-bits, which limited the SX machines to only 16MB of RAM.
Intel did offer an upgrade from the 486SX to the 486DX by installing the OverDrive processor to restore the missing circuits, but at the cost of reduced proximity to the main CPU circuitry.
www.textfiles.com /uploads/intel.txt   (2695 words)

  
 Intel 80286 microprocessor family
The second generation of x86 16-bit processors, Intel 80286, was released in 1982.
All modern 32-bit x86-based operating systems use 80386 protected mode that was introduced by next generation of Intel x86 processors.
The Intel 80286 microprocessor included new protected mode and all real-mode instructions that were introduced by 80186/80188 processors.
www.cpu-world.com /CPUs/80286   (367 words)

  
 Microprocessor Types and Specifications > P2 (286) Second-Generation Processors   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The Intel 80286 (normally abbreviated as 286) processor did not suffer from the compatibility problems that damned the 80186 and 80188.
Still, the 286 was Intel's first attempt to produce a CPU chip that supported multitasking, in which multiple programs run at the same time.
Because the 286 and 287 chips are asynchronous, the interface between the 286 and 287 chips is not as efficient as with the 8088 and 8087.
www.informit.com /articles/article.asp?p=130978&seqNum=26   (1018 words)

  
 CPU Guide: the first CPUs
Intel was contracted to create a custom chip for a desktop calculator — the firm had done three or four of those already — but decided it could do the job more efficiently with a flexible, multi-purpose chip, which could be re-used again and again in different applications.
Like the 8086, the 286 had a segmented architecture — you couldn't just nominate a place in memory you wanted to go to, you had to separately set a segment register and an offset, so there were many ways to get to the same place.
It simply wasn't possible to run an ISA bus at the same speeds that the 286 was to become capable of later on: by putting it on a separate clock it became practical to take the CPU and main board to the limit of their potential.
redhill.net.au /c/c-1.html   (2566 words)

  
 [No title]
Intel warns that this instruction may be implemented differently on future processors.
Clocks Size Operands 808x 286 386 486 Bytes reg,reg - - 3 3 3 reg,mem - - 6 3 3-7 MOVZX - Move with Zero Extend (386+) Usage: MOVZX dest,src Modifies flags: None Copies the value of the source operand to the destination register with the zeroes extended.
Clocks Size Operands 808x 286 386 486 Bytes reg16 - 14 10 11 3 mem16 - 16 11 11 5 VERW - Verify Write (286+ protected) Usage: VERW src Modifies flags: ZF Verifies the specified segment selector is valid and is ratable at the current privilege level.
www.qzx.com /pc-gpe/intel.doc   (6212 words)

  
 Dr. Dobb's | Undocumented Corner | July 22, 2001
Intel didn't invent the algorithm; the company borrowed one that was in wide distribution on the Internet, and published it in the i486 Microprocessor Programmer's Reference Manual (Intel Corp. 1990), claiming "Copyright Intel Corporation." Oddly, the original algorithm was published in two halves, in opposite ends of the manual.
Even though Intel's algorithm violates all of its own guidelines, the company is partially exonerated by the Pentium programmer's reference manual, where Intel says that it's acceptable to use this algorithm to detect the differences in these processors.
Intel's intentions were noble, but their implementation was flawed (see http://www.x86.org for an updated version of this algorithm).
www.ddj.com /dept/windows/184409966   (2301 words)

  
 Untitled Document
In the mid-1960s, semiconductor pioneer and Intel co-founder Gordon Moore noticed that, largely as a result of feature size shrinkage, chip power was roughly doubling every 18 months, with a concurrent reduction in cost.
The so-called “Moore’s Law” curve of industry progress is one of the standards of the chipmaking world, and is constantly cited by industry executives as they describe their strategic plans (indeed, it’s rare to attend a conference without seeing many presentation slides mentioning the phenomenon!).
The die size is generally a function of the number of transistors on the chip (which has increased by several orders of magnitude) and the minimum size of the features forming each transistor (which has shrunk from 10 microns on the 4004 to 0.35 micron, or 350 nanometers, on the Pentium II).
web.rollins.edu /~tlairson/tech/mooreslaw3.html   (1528 words)

  
 INTEL 286
The introduction of the Intel 286 processor originally featured in the IBM AT class computers should have solved the small vs. large memory model problem and let multi-tasking multi-user systems develop.
Observers of the time noted that MicroSoft which had only single tasking software and Intel were working pretty closely together at the time, and it was Digital Research who was ready to storm the market with a multi-tasking Dos but was unable to do so because of an 'I gotcha' in the i286 instruction set.
Intel engineers left this instruction out on purpose, believing that once one had gone to the protected mode, it was irresponsible to return to the real mode, and that doing so would only lead to inherently unstable applications.
www.vannattabros.com /history5.html   (490 words)

  
 We Will Beat Any Competitors Price On All Fax Machines, Copiers & Supplies
Intel Celeron, Intel Itanium 2, Intel Pentium 4, Intel Pentium Iii S, Intel Xeon, Intel Xeon (multi-Core), Intel Xeon Mp, No Processor,...
Intel Celeron M, Intel Core 2 Duo (dual Core), Intel Core Duo (dual Core), Intel Core Solo, Intel Pentium Iii M, Intel Pentium M, Intel Strongarm Sa-1110, Transmeta Crusoe, Unclassified,...
Amd Athlon, Intel Core 2 Duo (dual Core), Intel Itanium, Intel Pentium 4, Intel Xeon, Intel Xeon Mp, No Processor, Risc, Ultrasparc Ii I, Ultrasparc Iii, Ultrasparc Iiii, Unclassified,...
www.amatteroffax.com /MainCat_5_Computers.htm   (525 words)

  
 Svět hardware - Intel: S 45nm technologií máme dva roky náskok před AMD
Intel tak spěchá, protože díky této technologii a díky tomu plánovanému rychlému přechodu na ní bude mít o 50% nižší výrobní náklady a cenově AMD ušlape....vyhlídky nic moc.
Ostatně nikde jsem neviděl omluvu za to, že je slibovaná grafická karta slabší, jen uvedení na pravou míru a tohle Intel udělal také.
Právě kvůli vysokým frekvencím zvolil Intel koncepci procesoru, kterou znáš a na kterou nadáváš.
www.svethardware.cz /disc_doc-N8CEF17D55FE5C1E4C12572D0006225B4.html   (4644 words)

  
 IT Manager's Journal :: AMD still No. 2 but seems to be trying harder
Intel's segmented architecture was advertised as enforcing structured coding (back when such software was not common), even though the 20-bit addressing limit (Motorola supported 24-bit addresses) was a major burden to programmers, not to mention degrading performance.
Intel's 286 and 386 were incremental improvements, with the added feature that Intel pretended to sign up AMD as a second source.
Intel's simultaneous support with a chipset and the advance work with Microsoft was by then enough to guarantee its acceptance by the PC companies.
www.itmanagersjournal.com /articles/7242?tid=78&tid=112   (1849 words)

  
 Untitled Document
In fact, Intel's decision to make enormous sacrifices of performance, power consumption, and cost for the sake of maintaining the Pentium's backwards compatibility with legacy x86 code was probably the most strategically-important decision that the company has ever made.
Intel has differentiated between it's Celeron and standard Pentium III line by keeping the Celeron chips to 128K of on-chip cache and 66MHz bus speeds, and boosting the Pentium III from 512K of 1/2 speed off-chip L1 cache to 256K of full speed on-chip L1 cache - with 100 and 133MHz bus speeds.
Intel added some goodies like MMX, SSE, and integrated cache over the years, and they changed the way the processors were made, but they were all the same basic design.
www.angelfire.com /alt2/prjkt/page3.html   (3521 words)

  
 [No title]
The Intel versus AMD legacy is enrooted in the eighties and began to blossom in the mid nineties.
Intel eventually added MMX instructions to their chip which enabled the Pentium to better process high end graphics.
To some extent, Intel was annoyed that consumers were choosing an inferior chip (albeit a cheaper chip) to their own superior chip.
www.csun.edu /~vcact00f/311/termProjects/700class/IntelVS.AMD.doc   (5098 words)

  
 Intel Facts
Once Intel realised the potential of the new chips, the company offered Busicom a lower price in return for the rights to the microprocessor design and the rights to market it for non-calculator applications.
It was based on Intel's 8080 microprocessor, had 256 bytes of basic memory, and was programmed by flipping toggle switches on its front panel.
A quote from the Popular Electronics article about why Intel's 8080 chip was chosen for the Altair: "In practice, a lower-performance processor would have been adequate for the majority of the tasks the user might wish to initially define.
www.coopsjokes.com /amz/amzintel.htm   (1108 words)

  
 CPU-INFO.COM, x86 Processor info you need to know!
When Intel launched the 286 it ran at a speed of 6 MHz, the speed was gradually increased to 8MHz, 10MHz, 12MHZ, 16MHZ, 20MHz and eventually 25MHz.
Intel was still creating the micro processor market and availability would help doing just that.
In 1985 Intel introduced the 386 at a speed of 16MHz and in those days the 286 was available at a speed of 25MHz.
www.cpu-info.com /index2.php?mainid=html/cpu/286.php   (482 words)

  
 Welcome to the Intel® Software Dispatch Subscription Program | developers.net
Currently used by Intel customers in the server and workstation market segments, Woodcrest is also ideal for intense computing and I/O workload environments, and high-end systems such as singleheight (1U) servers and blade servers, storage area networks (SAN) and network-attached storage (NAS) solutions, wireless and voice applications, and high-end medical imaging equipment.
In this forum, the senior fellow, VP and general manager of Intel's Software and Solutions Group, Richard Wirt, talked in depth about the software threading challenge, and new tools, techniques, and solutions for software developers.
Intel's senior VP and general manager of the Digital Enterprise Group outlines Intel's multi-core product roadmap and discusses how Moore's Law and the accelerated pace of Intel innovation are enabling faster, more reliable and more secure networking and computing technologies.
www.developers.net /intelisdshowcase   (543 words)

  
 TheManageMentor - Sample K Mailer - Marketing
Intel suddenly woke up to the realisation that they were operating in a no man’s land – caught between the industrial and consumer markets.
Consumers were under the misnomer that the Intel 286 CPU was all that they would ever require.
The trouble that Intel was facing was that though it was a part of the PC industry, if its image was linked with that of PCs, it could deter the company’s image-building exercises.
www.themanagementor.com /skm/mrkt/bps.htm   (983 words)

  
 Intel: A Core New Low
The 8088 gave way to the 8086, then to the variants of the 286 which were quickly replaced by the 32-bit 386 (available in both DX and SX models in various speeds, with a 32-bit and 16-bit bus respectively), which was replaced equally quickly by the 486.
When the Pentium II was launched, it was one of the pricier chips Intel had made in some time for the consumer segment, yet prices had fallen to under $4000 for a top end rig by then.
Intel wasn’t the company responding to competitors, rather it was they who were playing catch-up.
www.firingsquad.com /features/intel_core_new_low   (555 words)

  
 CPU Guide: the first CPUs
Intel was contracted to create a custom chip for a desktop calculator — the firm had done three or four of those already — but decided it could do the job more efficiently with a flexible, multi-purpose chip, which could be re-used again and again in different applications.
Like the 8086, the 286 had a segmented architecture — you couldn't just nominate a place in memory you wanted to go to, you had to separately set a segment register and an offset, so there were many ways to get to the same place.
It simply wasn't possible to run an ISA bus at the same speeds that the 286 was to become capable of later on: by putting it on a separate clock it became practical to take the CPU and main board to the limit of their potential.
www.redhill.net.au /c/c-1.html   (2566 words)

  
 cpu-collection.de >> 80286 >> Intel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The 80286 was introduced by Intel on February 1, 1982.
As the 80186/80188 CPUs were not really significant to personal computing, the 80286 was Intel's next step processor for micro computers.
Intel added four more address lines to the 8086/80186 design.
www.cpu-collection.de /?tn=0&l0=cl&l1=80286&l2=Intel   (305 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.