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Topic: Intensive agriculture


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  Agriculture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Agriculture (a term which encompasses farming) is the art, science or practice of producing food, feed, fiber and many other goods by the systematic raising of plants and animals.
Agriculture is also short for the study of the practice of agriculture—more formally known as agricultural science.
Intensive agriculture also depletes the fertility of the land over time and the end effect is that which happened in the Middle East, where some of the most fertile farmland in the world was turned into a desert by intensive agriculture.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Agriculture   (3468 words)

  
 Learn more about Agriculture in the online encyclopedia.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Agriculture is the process of producing food, feed, and fiber by cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals.
Agriculture includes both subsistence agriculture, which is producing enough food to meet the needs of the farmer and family, but no more) and also (almost universally in the "developed" nations and increasingly so in other areas) the production of financial income from cultivation of the land or commercial raising of animals (animal husbandry).
The practice of agriculture is often used to distinguish the neolithic period from earlier parts of the stone age.
www.onlineencyclopedia.org /a/ag/agriculture.html   (1165 words)

  
 ScienceDaily: Agriculture   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Agriculture is the process of producing food, feed, fiber and many other desired products by the cultivation of certain plants and the raising of domesticated animals (livestock).
The practice of agriculture is also known as "farming", while scientists, inventors and others devoted to improving farming methods and implements are also said to be engaged in agriculture.
Intensive agriculture also depletes the fertility of the land over time and the end effect is that which happened in the Middle East, were some of the most fertile farmland in the world was turned into a desert by intensive agriculture.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/agriculture   (3836 words)

  
 Encyclopedia :: encyclopedia : Intensive farming   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Intensive agriculture made it possible to greatly increase productivity during the twentieth century, and helped ensure a proper and stable food supply for the growing population.
Agricultural productivity gains allowed for the reduction in the farming population, mostly in developed countries.
Intensive farming of animals such as battery-hens, and crated veal calves is considered as cruel.
www.hallencyclopedia.com /Intensive_farming   (300 words)

  
 Subsistence Agriculture   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
Agriculture can refer to subsistence agriculture, the production of enough food to meet just the...
Intensive Agriculture Intensive agriculture is the primary subsistence pattern of large-scale, populous societies.
A profile of a African ethnic group that is primarily dependent on agriculture for subsistence.
www.pmcenters.org /subsistence-agriculture.html   (187 words)

  
 Encyclopédie :: encyclopedia : Agriculture intensive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
L'agriculture intensive est un système de production agricole caractérisé par l'usage important d'intrants, et cherchant à maximiser la production par rapport aux facteurs de production, qu'il s'agisse de la main d'œuvre, du sol ou des autres moyens de production (matériel, intrants divers).
L'agriculture intensive a permis d'augmenter très fortement les rendements au cours du XXe siècle et de diminuer corrélativement les coûts de production.
L'agriculture intensive est parfois pratiquée aux dépens des considérations environnementales, d'où son rejet par de nombreux producteurs et consommateurs.
www.encyclopedie.cc /Agriculture_intensive   (333 words)

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