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Topic: International Code of Botanical Nomenclature


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  International Code of Botanical Nomenclature - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN) is the set of rules and recommendations dealing with the formal botanical names that are given to plants.
Botanical nomenclature is independent of zoological and bacteriological nomenclature, which are governed by their own Codes (see Nomenclature Codes).
Nomenclature concerns itself only with the question which name should be used for any taxon that is recognized by taxonomy: see correct name.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/International_Code_of_Botanical_Nomenclature   (563 words)

  
 International Code of Zoological Nomenclature - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The International Code of Zoological Nomenclature is a set of rules in zoology that have one fundamental aim: to provide the maximum universality and continuity in classifying all animals according to taxonomic judgment.
The Code is meant to guide the nomenclature of animals, while leaving the zoologists some degree of freedom in naming and classifying new species.
The rules in the Code determine what names are potentially valid for any taxon including the ranks of subspecies and superfamily.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/International_Code_of_Zoological_Nomenclature   (763 words)

  
 International_Code_of_Botanical_Nomenclature
The nomenclature code should not be confused with the scientific classification of living things.
Botanical nomenclature is independent of zoological and bacteriological nomenclature.
The code calls for the material from which a taxon is described, and on which a taxon is based, to be deposited and preserved in a herbarium.
www.apawn.com /search.php?title=International_Code_of_Botanical_Nomenclature   (218 words)

  
 EPA: Federal Register: Food Labeling: Ingredient Labeling of Dietary Supplements That Contain Botanicals
Botanical nomenclature is an evolving science that is influenced by new discoveries and the correction of past misidentifications of plants.
The International Code of Botanical Nomenclature is regulated by the Nomenclature Section of an International Botanical Congress.
The International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (Saint Louis Code) 2000, a publication of the International Association for Plant Taxonomy, is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51.
www.epa.gov /fedrgstr/EPA-IMPACT/2003/August/Day-28/i21981.htm   (9603 words)

  
 How animals are given scientific names
There are three main Codes of Nomenclature: the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, covering animals; the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, covering plants (including fungi); and the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria.
Hugh Strickland presented a Code of nomenclature to the British Association for the Advancement of Science (Charles Darwin was on its committee).
At the 17th Congress of Zoology in Monaco, responsibility for future Codes was transferred from the International Zoological Congresses to the International Union of Biological Sciences.
www.museums.org.za /bio/animal_nomenclature.htm   (3011 words)

  
 International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (Tokyo Code) - Untitled
The Code may be modified only by action of a plenary session of an International Botanical Congress on a resolution moved by the Nomenclature Section of that Congress1.
Its officers are: (1) the president of the Nomenclature Section, elected by the organizing committee of the International Botanical Congress in question; (2) the recorder, appointed by the same organizing committee; (3) the rapporteur-général, elected by the previous Congress; (4) the vice-rapporteur, elected by the organizing committee on the proposal of the rapporteur-général.
The voting on nomenclature proposals is of two kinds: (a) a preliminary guiding mail vote and (b) a final and binding vote at the Nomenclature Section of the International Botanical Congress.
www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de /b-online/code/Modif.htm   (424 words)

  
 Botany 3700 Plant Nomenclature
International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN) governs the naming of plants.
Nomenclature of taxonomic groups is based on priority of publication.
Nomenclatural Type - specimen of specific rank to which the name of the taxon is permanently attached.
arnica.csustan.edu /boty3700/lectures/nomenclature.htm   (777 words)

  
 Federal Register - 68 FR 51693, August 28, 2003: Food Labeling: Ingredient Labeling of Dietary Supplements That Contain ...
We are revising the language in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) to make the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature the only reference that may be used on the rules for determining and formatting the Latin binomial name of a botanical ingredient for dietary supplement labeling purposes.
When needed to positively identify the botanical ingredient, the direct final rule is continuing to require that the Latin binomial name also must include the author citation, stated in accordance with the internationally accepted rules on botanical nomenclature found in the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (Saint Louis Code) 2000.
It is the responsibility of manufacturers and distributors to ensure that any botanical used as an ingredient of a dietary supplement or other food marketed in the United States is safe for consumption and complies with all applicable requirements of the act.
vm.cfsan.fda.gov /~lrd/fr03828b.html   (9832 words)

  
 PBIO 450 Lecture Notes -- International Code -- Spring 1998: Principles
The International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, published in 1994 as volume 131 of the irregular series Regnum Vegetabile, is the result of deliberations held at Yokohama, Japan in late August and early September in 1993.
The purpose of Principle I is to establish the independence of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature from the codes dealing with zoological nomenclature and bacteriological nomenclature.
Principle IV establishes the relationship all taxonomists have with the Code, namely that one may circumscribe a taxon in any way one believes necessary and that different reasonable persons may reasonably disagree as to what elements (established by application of the type method, Principle II) should be included in a given circumscription of the taxon.
www.life.umd.edu /emeritus/reveal/PBIO/WWW/ICBNprinc.html   (1786 words)

  
 International Code of Botanical Nomenclature
A nomenclatural type (typus) is that element to which the name of a taxon is permanently attached, whether as a correct name or as a synonym.
The nomenclatural type is not necessarily the most typical or representative element of a taxon.
For nomenclatural purposes names given to lichens shall be considered as applying to their fungal component.
www.micologi.it /ICBN_chap2.htm   (7125 words)

  
 The Kew Rule
The Kew Rule stated that the nomenclature used by an established monographer or in a major publication should be adopted....
He could draft a proposal for the International Botanical Congress to be held in 2005.
International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (Saint Louis Code).
www.botany.utoronto.ca /courses/Bot300/lectures/KewRule.html   (573 words)

  
 Vitamins and Mineral Supplements and Herbal Supplements for your Health   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The ICBN is accepted by the worldwide taxonomic community as "the rules that govern scientific naming in botany" as determined and "revised at Nomenclature Section meetings at successive International Botanical Congresses.
The present edition of the International code of botanical nomenclature embodies the decisions of the XVI International Botanical Congress held in St Louis in 1999 and supersedes the Tokyo Code, published six years [earlier, in 1994,] subsequent to the XV International Botanical Congress in Yokohama."
International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (St. Louis Code) 2000, adopted by the International Association for Plant Taxonomy at the XVI International Botanical Congress.
www.herbalgram.org /naturemade/herbalgram/articleview.asp?a=2601   (706 words)

  
 International Code of Botanical Nomenclature
For the purposes of this provision, explicit indication that the nomenclaturally typical element of the genus is included is considered as equivalent to inclusion of the type, whether or not it has been previously designated (see also Art.
Additional, independent designations for plants used in agriculture, forestry, and horticulture (and arising either in nature or cultivation) are dealt with in the International code of nomenclature for cultivated plants, where regulations are provided for their formation and use.
Epithets in names published in conformity with this Code may be used as cultivar epithets under the rules of the International code of nomenclature for cultivated plants-1980, when this is considered to be the appropriate status for the groups concerned.
www.micologi.it /ICBN_chap3.htm   (5233 words)

  
 Plant Biology 304   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The naming of plants is covered by the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, new edition published after each International Botanical Congress, referred to by the city where the Congress took place.
Botanical nomenclature is independent from Zoological and Bacteriological nomenclature (Fungi are considered to be plants), rules somewhat similar but some major differences occur.
NEW cultivar names cannot be in Latin and may not be the same as the botanical or common name of a genus.
www.science.siu.edu /plant-Biology/PLB304/Nomenclature.html   (1064 words)

  
 Biological Nomenclature - McNeill: The BioCode: Integrated bionomenclature for the 21st century?
Biological nomenclature, the principles and procedures governing the scientific names of organisms (animals, plants, fungi, protists, bacteria, etc.) and also of viruses, is vital for all scientific communication.
Anyone who has used our existing codes to try to determine the application of many of the old and little used names published in eighteenth and early nineteenth century literature will recognize how time-consuming a thorough nomenclatural investigation under the terms of the existing codes must be.
For example, the ICBN and the BC talk of "earlier" and "later" names, whereas the ICZN speaks of "senior" and "junior", and the ICBN distinguishes between nomenclatural and taxonomic synonyms, whereas the ICZN and the BC prefer objective and subjective synonyms.
www.life.umd.edu /emeritus/reveal/pbio/nomcl/mcne.html   (3128 words)

  
 Orchid Nomenclature
The International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (I.C.B.N.), which is regulated by the Nomenclature Section of an International Botanical Congress, and
The International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (I.C.N.C.P.), which is regulated by the International Commission for the Nomenclature of Cultivated Plants.
The current edition of the I.C.B.N. is the Tokyo edition, revised in accordance with decisions of the XV International Botanical Congress held in Yokohama 1993 and published in 1994.
www.notsogreenthumb.org /orchids/nomenclature/nomenclature.htm   (641 words)

  
 IOP Newsletter 51: April 1994 - International Organisation of Palaeobotany   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The XV International Botanical Congress in Tokyo, meeting at Yokohama, Japan, in August-September 1993, restructured the International Code ofBotanical Nomenclature and made important improvements designed to reduce changes in the instability of names.
In order to encourage nomenclatural stability, your assistance would be apprecoated in promulgating this important information to the editors ofbiological journals in your country or subject area.
Resolves that the decisions of the Nomenclature Section with respect to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, as well as theappointment of officers and members of the nomenclature committees, made by that section during its meetings, 22-27 August 1993, be accepted.
www.ohiou.edu /~iop/news/iop51/p5.html   (627 words)

  
 Garden Botany
Over the past 250 years, the botanical community has developed an elaborate system of rules for the proper naming of plants.
The latest edition of the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants was published in 1995.
These international registration authorities (IRAs) check to make sure that the name is in accordance with the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature and the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants.
www.bbg.org /gar2/topics/botany/names_rules.html   (843 words)

  
 Unasylva - Vol. 10, No. 4 - Scientific nomenclature trees
A possible benefit is the increased interest aroused among foresters in plant nomenclature and their support of proposals to amend the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature toward more stabilization.
For the Seventh International Botanical Congress at Stockholm in 1950, an amendment was submitted similar to that quoted below to reject a name as not effectively published if it neither had been accepted by a second author nor listed in an index of scientific names within one hundred years after publication.
This problem of nomenclature stabilization was one of the most important considered by the Nomenclature Section of the Eighth International Botanical Congress at Paris in 1954, in amending the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature of 1952.
www.fao.org /docrep/x5381e/x5381e05.htm   (2322 words)

  
 International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (Tokyo Code) - Untitled   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Code applies equally to names of taxonomic groups treated as plants whether or not these groups were originally so treated (see Pre.
The nomenclature of a taxonomic group is based upon priority of publication.
Principle VI The Rules of nomenclature are retroactive unless expressly limited.
www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de /b-online/code/Div_1.htm   (124 words)

  
 Royal Horticultural Society - Research: Horticultural Themes - Plant naming
This is the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants, and it governs the naming of cultivars and cultivar-groups.
Like the botanical code, this is periodically revised and the current edition dates from 1995; it is not at present available online.
The International Code of Botanical Nomenclature 1994 (Tokyo Code)
www.rhs.org.uk /research/horticultural_themes/plantname.asp   (523 words)

  
 Botany Libraries Botanical Databases
Curtis Botanical Magazine- William Curtis (1746-1799) was a trained pharmacist living in London, whose greater interest was the study of flora and insects.
Index Nominum Genericorum (ING) Database- The Index Nominum Genericorum (ING), a collaborative project of the International Association for Plant Taxonomy (IAPT) and the Smithsonian Institution, was initiated in 1954 as a compilation of generic names published for all organisms covered by the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature.
International Plant Name Index- The International Plant Names Index (IPNI) is a database of the names and associated basic bibliographical details of all seed plants.
www.huh.harvard.edu /libraries/databases.htm   (1808 words)

  
 Intro and Background
I apologize to workers in other groups (especially because the fungi are not plants), but the nomenclature which governs fungi is the same as that for plants, and the examples hold true throughout.
As the famous botanical nomenclaturalist Marinus Anton Donk said, "Nomenclature is the handmaiden of taxonomy." As such, taxonomy and nomenclature should not be confused even though they have evolved together.
The AAAS Botanical Club met in Philadelphia in 1904, and adopted the renegade "American Code of Botanical Nomenclature" which deviated from the older, general Laws in: 1) priority was to start in 1753, not any other date; and 2) every taxon was to be based on a "type," which was invariably linked to that name.
fp.bio.utk.edu /mycology/Nomenclature/nom-intro.htm   (1738 words)

  
 CRDReference: Hennebert, G. L. and Gams, W. 2002 Analysis of possibilities to amend or delete Art. 59 of the ...
59 of the international code of botanical nomenclature to achieve a unified nomenclature and classification of the fungi
59 of the international code of botanical nomenclature to achieve a unified nomenclature and classification of the fungi", http://www.cbs.knaw.nl/Research/Gams/HENNE101.pdf.
"The Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN) includes several specific sets of rules that have been introduced to comply with the needs of certain disciplines such as mycology.
alcor.concordia.ca /~raojw/crd/reference/reference001941.html   (379 words)

  
 IOP   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The XV International Botanical Congress in Tokyo, meeting at Yokohama, Japan, in August-September 1993, restructured the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature and made important improvements designed to reduce changes in the instability of names.
In order to encourage nomenclatural stability, your assistance would be apprecoated in promulgating this important information to the editors of biological journals in your country or subject area.
The XV International Botanical Congress urges plant taxonomists, while such work continues, to avoid displacing well established names for purely nomenclatural reasons, whether by change in their application or by resurrection of long-forgotten names;
www.ohiou.edu /~IOP/news/iop51/p5.htmlx   (583 words)

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