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Topic: International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia


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 International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Tribunal operates three Trial Chambers and one Appeals Chamber (which also functions as the Appeals Chamber for the ICTR); the Presiding Judge of the Appeals Chamber is also the President of the Tribunal as a whole.
Supporters of this approach respond that since all three forms are mutually intelligible to a high degree (and indeed were officially considered to be single language before the breakup of the former Yugoslavia) separate translations are not needed.
The majority of Croats and Serbs doubt the tribunal's integrity and question the tenability of its legal procedures (although the Serbs's and Croats's opinions on the court are almost always exactly the opposite with regard to the cases that involve both parties).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/International_Criminal_Tribunal_for_the_Former_Yugoslavia   (1948 words)

  
 International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) was established in 1993.
Its formal name is the "International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991." It is located in the Hague.
International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991.
www.law.columbia.edu /library/Research_Guides/internat_law/icty   (482 words)

  
 International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia: Current Survey: Introduction
The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia ('Tribunal') was established by the United Nations Security Council in 1993 in order to put an end to the widespread and flagrant violations of international humanitarian law occurring in the former Yugoslavia.
Since the Tribunal is an 'international' institution, its Rules attempt to combine the procedural traditions of the major systems of law prevalent in developed nations that is, the civil and common law systems.
The decisions rendered by the Tribunal's Chambers thus far cover a broad spectrum of issues and demonstrate the difficulties inherent in melding civil law and common law rules and international human rights standards into a truly 'international' body of procedural and substantive criminal law.
www.ejil.org /journal/Vol8/No1/sr1.html   (1357 words)

  
 The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
The power of the International Tribunal to impose penalties is limited, under Article 24 of the Statute, to imprisonment for terms to be determined in accordance with the general practice regarding prison sentences in the courts of the former Yugoslavia.
The Tribunal was not empowered to order compensation as a form of penalty on the convicted person or on the State of which he is a national.
An international arrest warrant would then be issued and transmitted to all States, and if the Trial Chamber is satisfied that the failure to execute a warrant of arrest is due to the State's refusal to cooperate with the Tribunal, the President shall so inform the Security Council.
www.ejil.org /journal/Vol5/No3/art4-02.html   (2173 words)

  
 The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the Kosovo conflict   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The ICTY and the conflict in the former Yugoslavia from 1991 to 1995
Under international law it is by no means necessary that the controlling authorities should plan all the operations of the units dependent on them, choose their targets, or give specific instructions concerning the conduct of military operations and any alleged violations of international humanitarian law.
She further reaffirmed that the Tribunal has jurisdiction over genocide, crimes against humanity, grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and violations of the laws and customs of war which have been committed since 1991 or continue to be committed, anywhere in the former Yugoslavia, “by anyone”.
www.icrc.org /web/eng/siteeng0.nsf/htmlall/57JQD2?OpenDocument&View=defaultBody&style=custo_print   (10984 words)

  
 International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia - Balkans   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia - Balkans
The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) is a body of the United Nations (UN) established to prosecute war crimes in the former Yugoslavia.
The tribunal exclusively uses translators who speak Bosnian and Croatian variants and some of the indictees have filed complaints about not being able to fully understand the translations.
www.balkans.eu.com /wiki/index.php?title=International_Criminal_Tribunal_for_the_former_Yugoslavia   (1167 words)

  
 International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia - International Justice - Global Policy Forum
Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic still refuses to cooperate with the court that he perceives as "an institution created to convict him" and his actions may set a precedent for future trials of leaders, such as Saddam Hussein, at the International Criminal Court.
Whether the two former Serb leaders remain at large due to unstated NATO policy, Muslim and Croatian politicians’ fear of war secrets revelations or Serb authorities’ unwillingness to take political risks, the author affirms that the fugitives are “a source of embarrassment” to NATO and former Yugoslavia Tribunal officials.
Carla del Ponte, Chief Prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia, remarks on the future of domestic war crimes trials and the relationship of the tribunal with the states of former Yugoslavia.
www.globalpolicy.org /intljustice/yugoindx.htm   (5923 words)

  
 yugoslavia
The International Tribunal shall have the power to prosecute persons responsible for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed in the territory of the former Yugoslavia since 1991 in accordance with the provisions of the present Statute.
The International Tribunal shall have the power to prosecute persons committing genocide as defined in paragraph 2 of this article or of committing any of the other acts enumerated in paragraph 3 of this article.
International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (http://www.un.org/icty/) This site is maintained by the ICTY Press and Information Office with the technical expertise of the Information Technology Services Division of the United Nations and the Electronic Services Section of the Tribunal.
score.rims.k12.ca.us /activity/yugoslavia   (2538 words)

  
 International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY)
The ICTY is housed in the former headquarters of an insurance concern in the Churchillplein in the Hague, and its early years were devoted to — some would say wasted on — the prosecutions of low-level perpetrators.
They Would Never hurt a Fly: War criminals on trial in The’ Hague by Slavenka Drakulić, and Justice in a Time of War: The true story behind the International Criminal Tribunal for the Farmer Yugoslavia by Pierre Hazan, are engaging attempts to grapple with This question.
The prosecution’s hopes of galvanizing international attention are frustrated by endless debates over procedure, just as it learns of the difficulties of speaking to those in region from an antiseptic international court removed from the world of the accused’s crimes.
www.arlindo-correia.com /180705.html   (1732 words)

  
 United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia Regulations   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Milan Milutinovic, born 19 December 1942 in Belgrade in the Republic of Serbia, who on May 24, 1999, the date of the Tribunal warrant issued in respect of that person, was the President of the Republic of Serbia in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
Dragoljub Ojdanic, born 1 June 1941 in the village of Ravni, near Uzice in the Republic of Serbia, who on May 24, 1999, the date of the Tribunal warrant issued in respect of that person, was the Chief of the General Staff of the Armed Forces of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
Vlajko Stojiljkovic, born in Maka Krsna in the Republic of Serbia, who on May 24, 1999, the date of the Tribunal warrant issued in respect of that person, was the Minister of Internal Affairs of the Republic of Serbia in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
laws.justice.gc.ca /en/U-2/SOR-99-304/text.html   (704 words)

  
 International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
"The Internship Programme of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia offers professionals, graduate students, and undergraduate students who are in their final stages of education the possibility to enhance their professional training in the unique environment of an international court.
The Tribunal is unable to provide participants in the Internship Programme with remuneration, nor is it possible to provide any reimbursement for any expenses incurred during the Internship.
Interns cannot apply for employment at the Tribunal during the period of their internship and during the six months immediately thereafter.
www.csupomona.edu /~gssilliman/internships/ICTY.htm   (1184 words)

  
 The International Criminal Tribunal  for the Former Yugoslavia
The Tribunal -- created in 1993, with the US as the father, the Security Council as the mother, and Madeleine Albright as the midwife -- also relies on the military assets of the NATO powers to track down and arrest the suspects it tries for war crimes.
Following World War II there was an urgent need for a permanent international criminal court to prosecute those accused of war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide, but the Cold War intervened.
Senior US officials have explicitly admitted that this danger is the reason for their aversion to the proposed new court.{9} But this is clearly not the case with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia.
www.zmag.org /tribunal.htm   (1261 words)

  
 International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. (from Law, Crime, and Law Enforcement) --  Encyclopædia ...
Criminal law not only determines what is criminal conduct but also regulates the methods of capturing, charging, and trying suspected criminals; imposes penalties on convicted offenders; and determines the...
It is based only on mutual consent of sovereign states, and it is effective either because the nations of the world recognize that it is to their best interests to accept it or because stronger nations are able to force their point of view...
Founded in Ghent, Belgium, in 1873, the Institute of International Law (IIL) is a private organization that formulates and seeks to implement principles of international law to help govern the conduct of international relations.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-222309   (854 words)

  
 Reporters sans frontières - International Criminal tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
International Criminal tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia12 December 2002
Reporters without Borders welcomes the December 11 decision by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) not to force ex-Washington Post journalist Jonathan Randal to give evidence before it in a war crimes case.
The ICTY judges ruled on the appeal that journalists working in war zones could not be forced to testify unless their "evidence had a direct and important value in determining a core issue in the case".
www.rsf.org /article.php3?id_article=4513   (488 words)

  
 :: Institute for International Law and Public Policy :: People : Distinguished Scholars
She is a highly regarded expert on international law, and serves as president of the American Society of International Law.
Prior to moving to Princeton, she was the J. Sinclair Armstrong Professor of International, Foreign and Comparative Law at Harvard University where she was director of graduate and international legal studies at the Harvard Law School and founder and faculty director of the Harvard Colloquium on International Affairs.
Her teaching and research have focused on global governance, the politics of international tribunals, and interdisciplinary analyses of international legal issues.
www.temple.edu /iilpp/distinguishedScholars20032004.htm   (1135 words)

  
 Tribunal Yugo   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
808 (1993) of 22 February 1993, the Security Council decided that an international tribunal would be established for the prosecution of persons responsible for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed in the territory of the former Yugoslavia since 1991 and requested the Secretary-General to prepare a report on this matter.
The report of the Secretary-General containing the statute of the International Tribunal was submitted to the Security Council, which, acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations, adopted it in its resolution
By this resolution an international tribunal for the former Yugoslavia was established.
www.unhchr.ch /html/menu2/2/yugtrib.htm   (169 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | Europe | At a glance: Hague tribunal
The tribunal is the first international body for the prosecution of war crimes since the Nuremberg and Tokyo trials held in the aftermath of World War II.
The tribunal has large teams of investigators working across the former Yugoslavia but it does not have its own police force and instead relies on the former Yugoslav republics or the international peace forces, S-For and K-For in Bosnia and Kosovo, to make arrests.
Thousands of soldiers and civilians were involved in the violence as the former Yugoslavia disintegrated - but one consistent thread running throughout the proceedings has been the attempt to bring to trial those ultimately responsible for the crimes.
news.bbc.co.uk /2/hi/europe/1418304.stm   (507 words)

  
 International Criminal Law
International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, SC resolution 955 and Statute
Tribunal - This electronic journal provides in-depth reports, interviews and assessments from the region of the impact of the War Crimes Tribunal in The Hague.
International Centre for Criminal Law Reform and Criminal Justice Policy - This is an excellent site (even if all its sections are not yet fully implemented) dedicated to criminal law issues analysed from a domestic, regional and global point of view.
www2.spfo.unibo.it /spolfo/CRIMLAW.htm   (974 words)

  
 bibliography 1.4.7   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Bantekas, Ilias, Study on the minimum rules of conduct in cross-examination to be applied by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, Revue Hellenique de Droit International, (1), p.
Creta, Vincent M., The search for justice in the Former Yugoslavia and beyond: analyzing the rights of the accused under the statute and the rules of procedure and evidence of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, Houston Journal of International Law, 20 (issue 2), pp.
Gaeta, Paola, Is NATO authorized or obliged to arrest persons indicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia?, European Journal of International Law, 9 (issue 1), pp.
www.ntu.ac.uk /nls/centreforlegalresearch/itccp/8884gp.html   (1774 words)

  
 Reporters sans frontières - International criminal tribunal for the former Yugoslavia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
International criminal tribunal for the former Yugoslavia13 June 2002
Reporters Without Borders protested today at the 9 June decision by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) to order ex-Washington Post reporter Jonathan Randal to give evidence about an interview he had in 1993 with a former Bosnian Serb leader.
International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia : journalist summoned to give evidence before the ICTY appeals against the judges’; decision
www.rsf.org /article.php3?id_article=2595   (529 words)

  
 X. The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY)
International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia-Tribunal Penal International pour l-ex-Yugoslavia (The Hague: United Nations-International Criminal tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, 2001)
International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia-Tribunal Penal International pour l-ex-Yugoslavia (The Hague: United Nations-International Criminal tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, 1998)
Boško: “International Tribunal for Violation of international Humanitarian law in Former Yugoslavia: Applicable Law.” Jugoslovenska revija za medjunarodno pravo, 1-2 (1993), 93-105.
www.cla.purdue.edu /history/facstaff/Ingrao/si/team10_bib.htm   (4310 words)

  
 Statement on the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
The United States remains strongly committed to supporting the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR).
The United States and others in the international community have made clear that upholding international obligations to the ICTY is a prerequisite for further integration into the Euro-Atlantic community.
Serbia and Montenegro's lack of cooperation with the ICTY also undermines the confidence of the international community that it is willing and able to prosecute fairly and effectively perpetrators of war crimes and crimes against humanity.
www.state.gov /s/wci/ps/38478.htm   (552 words)

  
 OUP: The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia: Kerr   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Tribunal was established as a tool of politics, but it was a judicial, not a political tool.
The central question is whether an international judicial institution, such as the Tribunal, can operate in a highly politicized context and fulfill an explicit political purpose, without the judicial process becoming politicized.
This last element is the key to the Tribunal's success in maintaining a delicate balancing act so that its external political function does not impinge on its impartial judicial status, and instead enhances its effectiveness.
www.oup.co.uk /isbn/0-19-926305-1   (522 words)

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