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Topic: International Phonetic Association


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In the News (Tue 16 Jul 19)

  
  international phonetic alphabet - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
The International Phonetic Alphabet is a phonetic alphabet used by linguists to accurately and uniquely represent each of the wide variety of sounds (phones or phonemes) the human vocal apparatus can produce.
These teachers based the IPA upon the Romic alphabet of Henry Sweet (1880-1881, 1971), which was formed from the Phonotypic Alphabet of Isaac Pitman and Alexander John Ellis (Kelly 1981).
International Phonetic Alphabet for English explains those IPA symbols used to represent the phonemes of English.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/International-Phonetic-Alphabet   (1049 words)

  
 IPA: Homepage
The IPA is the major as well as the oldest representative organisation for phoneticians.
The aim of the IPA is to promote the scientific study of phonetics and the various practical applications of that science.
In furtherance of this aim, the IPA provides the academic community world-wide with a notational standard for the phonetic representation of all languages - the
www.arts.gla.ac.uk /IPA/ipa.html   (71 words)

  
 International Phonetic Association - Langmaker
International Phonetic Association - The IPA is the major as well as the oldest representative organisation for phoneticians.
In furtherance of this aim, the IPA provides the academic community world-wide with a notational standard for the phonetic representation of all languages - the International Phonetic Alphabet (also IPA).
The 1993 Alphabet derives from the IPA 1989 Kiel Convention.
www.langmaker.com /db/Rsc_internationalphonetic.htm   (93 words)

  
 HTHS - The International Phonetic Association and the International Phonetic Alphabet
The International Phonetic Association is a group of people who are interested in science of phonetics and in the practical applications of phonetics.
The International Phonetic Association has developed a set of symbols and a notation system which is used to describe and write down all the sounds which occur in all the languages in the world.
In that sense, you could say that for students of phonetics the IPA chart is as important as the periodic table of chemical elements is for students of chemistry.
www.spectrum.uni-bielefeld.de /~thies/HTHS_WiSe2004-05/ipa.html   (1937 words)

  
 The International Phonetic Alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
The International Phonetic Alphabet of the International Phonetic Association
The International Phonetic Association (IPA) is the major as well as the oldest representative organization for phoneticians.
The IPA provides the academic community world-wide with a notational standard for the phonetic representation of all languages, the International Phonetic Alphabet (also IPA).
hometown.aol.com /hpaumit/ipachart.html   (251 words)

  
 International Phonetic Association - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The IPA’s major contribution to the academic community is the International Phonetic Alphabet—a notational standard for the phonetic representation of all languages.
The initialism IPA is used to refer to both the Association and the Alphabet.
Eventually it was decided that a universal alphabet, with the same symbol being used for the same sound in different languages was the ideal, and development of the International Phonetic Alphabet progressed rapidly up to the turn of the 20th century.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/International_Phonetic_Association   (378 words)

  
 The International Phonetic Alphabet
In ASCII IPA, it is an asterisk: [*].
The IPA symbol for this segment is an ‘r’ with a retroflex hook.
The IPA symbol is a ‘c’ with cedilla.
www.madore.org /~david/misc/linguistic/ipa   (7060 words)

  
 Interloping Scripts
Phonetic notations outside the IPA standard or peripheral to it have at times employed other Greek letters: Pullum and Laduslaw (1996) record usage of alpha, delta, eta, lambda (in mainstream Americanist use as a voiced alveolar lateral affricate, IPA [dɮ]), pi, rho, sigma (more popular in phonology as a symbol for syllable), and omega.
And though case is alien to the IPA, the IPA epsilon and iota should clearly be identified with th African characters derived from them, rather than the Greek—if the IPA needs to choose between the two (and it does).
The Uralic Phonetic Alphabet is used in the linguistic analysis of Uralic languages alone; it is begotten of the unfortunate tendency I've bemoaned elsewhere, for each linguistic subdiscipline in the 19th century to come up with its own transcription scheme.
www.tlg.uci.edu /~opoudjis/unicode/unicode_interloping.html   (3326 words)

  
 Language Log: The International Phonetic Alphabet
The IPA is defined by the International Phonetic Association, which revises it from time to time as new speech sounds are discovered.
The fullest exposition of the IPA is to be found in the Handbook of the International Phonetic Association (also in paperback).
For instance, the IPA symbols for the voiceless and voiced post-alveolar fricatives, ʃ and ʒ, do not appear on normal typewriters, especially English language typewriters, meaning that anyone writing in or about a language with these sounds, which are quite common, had to leave space for them and write them in by hand.
itre.cis.upenn.edu /~myl/languagelog/archives/000911.html   (1795 words)

  
 International Phonetic Alphabet - Gurupedia
The NATO phonetic alphabet ("alpha bravo") has been informally and nonstandardly called the International Phonetic Alphabet as well.
The International Phonetic Alphabet was originally developed by British and French phoneticians under the auspices of the
When characters from the IPA phonetic alphabet are embedding in another script they are isolated from from the rest of the text with either slashes ("/") or square brackets ("[" and "]").
www.gurupedia.com /i/in/international_phonetic_alphabet.htm   (460 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Phonetics
The object of study of phonetics are called phones.
There are several hundred different phones recognized by the International Phonetic Association (IPA) and transcribed in their International Phonetic Alphabet.
Phonetics was studied as early as 2500 years ago in ancient India.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=phonetic   (352 words)

  
 AUE: ASCII IPA: a way to represent speech using a computer keyboard   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
ASCII IPA is similar to the International Phonetic Alphabet used in modern dictionaries, but it uses the symbols available on most computer keyboards.
Other ASCII IPA symbols are used in descriptions of other languages and on other newsgroups, such as the linguistics group sci.lang.
ASCII IPA was developed by a team of alt.usage.english and sci.lang members led by Evan Kirshenbaum .
alt-usage-english.org /ipa/ascii_ipa_combined.shtml   (3519 words)

  
 International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)
The IPA was first published in 1888 by the Association Phonétique Internationale (International Phonetic Association), a group of French language teachers founded by Paul Passy.
The IPA is used in dictionaries to indicate the pronunciation of words.
The IPA is used in some foreign language text books and phrase books to transcribe the sounds of languages which are written with non-latin alphabets.
www.omniglot.com /writing/ipa.htm   (208 words)

  
 [No title]
the alphabet of the International Phonetic Association IPA).
The International Phonetic Association (IPA) was founded in 1886 in Paris, and has been ever since the official keeper of the Inernational Phonetic Alphabet (...
Although the IPA's emphasis has shifted in a more descriptive direction, there remains a lively tradition in Great Britain of teaching "received pronunciation" using explicit training in the IPA.
www.lycos.com /info/international-phonetic-alphabet--miscellaneous.html   (357 words)

  
 Glossika Store - Handbook of the International Phonetic Association : A Guide to the Use of the International Phonetic ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
The Handbook is in three parts: Part I contains an introduction to phonetic description and exemplification of the use of phonetic symbols; Part II consists of twenty-nine "Illustrations" of the application of the International Phonetic Alphabet to a range of languages; and Part III covers speech pathology, computer codings, and the history of the IPA.
Provides a comprehensive guide to the International Phonetic Alphabet, whose aim is to provide a universally agreed system of notation for the sounds of languages, and which has been widely used for over a century.
HANDBOOK OF THE IPA is a guide to the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet, the standard manner of transcribing speech in all of the world's languages.
astore.amazon.com /glossika03-20/detail/0521637511   (780 words)

  
 [No title]
SAMPA (Speech Assessment Methods Phonetic Alphabet) is a machine-readable ASCII transliteration of the International Phonetic Alphabet.
SAMPROSA is an extension for transcribing prosodic information, and XSAMPA is an extension which covers every symbol on the IPA chart, in principle allowing transcription of all the world's languages.
As language enthusiasts and polyglots become aware of the usefulness of the International Phonetic Alphabet, there will be more people using a precise means of transcribing the sounds of the world's languages.
www.lycos.com /info/international-phonetic-alphabet.html   (403 words)

  
 yourDictionary.com • Library: The International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)
The International Phonetic Alphabet was created by the International Phonetic Association (also IPA), formed by a group of English and French linguists way back in 1886.
Because of the precision the IPA affords, it is used in everything from language journals to dictionaries.
But while the International Phonetic Alphabet was designed by professional linguists, its use is not restricted to experts.
www.yourdictionary.com /library/ipa.html   (2051 words)

  
 ipedia.com: International Phonetic Alphabet Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
The NATO phonetic alphabet has been informally and nonstandardly called the International Phonetic Alphabet as well.
The International Phonetic Alphabet was originally developed by British and French phoneticians under the auspices of the International Phonetic Association, established in Paris in 1886 (both the organisation and the phonetic script are best known as IPA).
When characters from the IPA phonetic alphabet are embedding in another script they are isolated from from the rest of the text with either slasheses ("/") or square brackets ("[" and "]").
www.ipedia.com /international_phonetic_alphabet.html   (524 words)

  
 SIL Linguist Successfully Proposes New Phonetic Symbol
OCTOBER 21, 2005 The council of the International Phonetic Association has approved the adoption of the first new symbol in twelve years into the International Phonetic Alphabet.
The IPA is the organization that sets the standards for the transcription of speech sounds in the world’s languages.
Kenneth Olson, SIL's Associate International Linguistics Coordinator, proposed the new labiodental flap symbol, which is technically referred to as “a right hook ‘v’.” After review of Dr Olson’s proposal for the addition of the labiodental flap symbol, the IPA Council voted in favor of the addition.
www.sil.org /sil/news/2005/labiodental_flap.htm   (341 words)

  
 International Phonetic Alphabet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Not to be confused with the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”.
Gentium, a professionally designed international font (Latin, Greek, Cyrillic) in roman and italic typefaces that includes the IPA, but not yet tone letters or the new labiodental flap.
To properly view IPA symbols in that browser, you must set it to use a font which includes the IPA extensions characters.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet   (4915 words)

  
 SAMPA computer readable phonetic alphabet
SAM (Speech Assessment Methods) in 1987-89 by an international group of phoneticians, and was applied in the first instance to the European Communities languages Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, and Italian (by 1989); later to Norwegian and Swedish (by 1992); and subsequently to Greek, Portuguese, and Spanish (1993).
Associated with the coding (mapping) are guidelines for the transcription of the languages to which SAMPA has been applied.
All IPA symbols that coincide with lower-case letters of the Latin alphabet remain the same; all other symbols are recoded within the ASCII range 37..126.
www.phon.ucl.ac.uk /home/sampa/home.htm   (875 words)

  
 Organisation profile: International Phonetic Association (IPA) - UK   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
The IPA is the major as well as the oldest representative organisation for phoneticians, established in 1886 in Paris.
The aim of the Association is to promote the scientific study of phonetics and the various practical applications of that science.
In furtherance of this aim, the Association provides the academic community world-wide with a notational standard for the phonetic representation of all languages - the International Phonetic Alphabet (also IPA).
www.elsnet.org /orgs/0741.html?printversion   (188 words)

  
 International Phonetic Alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
Since languages use many different alphabets for spelling their words, and even the same language may spell the same sound with different letters, a standard symbol system for unambiguously representing each meaningful sound (phoneme) which can be produced by the human vocal apparatus is needed.
Thus linguists have devised the International Phonetic Alphabet.
The International Phonetic Association's International Phonetic Alphabet page--a complete chart of all IPA symbols.
homepage.mac.com /ebranscomb/courses/HEL/ipa.html   (183 words)

  
 Journal of the International Phonetic Association
The Journal of the International Phonetic Association (JIPA) is a forum for work in the fields of phonetic theory and description.
As well as including papers on laboratory phonetics/phonology and related topics, the journal encourages submissions on practical applications of phonetics to areas such as phonetics teaching and speech therapy, as well as the analysis of speech phenomena in relation to computer speech processing.
It is especially concerned with the theory behind the International Phonetic Alphabet and discussions of the use of symbols for illustrating the phonetic structures of a wide variety of languages.
www.cambridge.org /journals/journal_catalogue.asp?historylinks=alpha&mnemonic=ipa   (179 words)

  
 Studying Phonetics on the Net
John Wells and the Dept. of Phonetics and Linguistics, University College London have made up a cassette and cd of all of the sounds of the IPA which they will happily send to you for a fairly nominal sum.
British and American Vowels The vowel sounds and IPA symbols of American English in the Vowel quadrilateral; then a contrasting set of vowels for British English in a second quadrilateral.
Karen Chung is adding pages on various topics to her Introduction to Phonetics and Phonetics II course pages.
faculty.washington.edu /dillon/PhonResources/PhonResources.html   (3561 words)

  
 Linguistics Handbook
The Handbook of the International Phonetic Association was published by Cambridge University Press in July of 1999 and is being regularly reprinted in both hardback and paperback.
The recordings contained in this site are the words and text that appear in the illustrations in Part 2 of the Handbook and which demonstrate the application of the International Phonetic Alphabet to a wide variety of sound systems of languages of the world.
Electronic files of the Chart of the IPA, the Number Chart of the IPA, and the Chart of 'Extensions' to the International Phonetic Alphabet are available for viewing and printing here.
web.uvic.ca /ling/resources/ipa/handbook.htm   (238 words)

  
 The International Phonetic Alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-03)
The IPA is a writing system used by linguists to communicate with each other.
It is an international standard, promulgated by the International Phonetic Association.
The IPA has also defined a set of extensions for use in transcribing disordered speech.
www.ling.upenn.edu /phonetics/ipa.html   (55 words)

  
 Linguistics Handbook Downloads
These audio files are licensed to the IPA by their authors and accompany the phonetic descriptions published in the Handbook of the IPA or in the Journal of the IPA.
The electronic data from the Handbook of the IPA or the Journal of the IPA are intended for scholarly research and educational use.
Access to IPA data is provided at no cost to you and is intended for use in scholarship, research and educational purposes only.
web.uvic.ca /ling/resources/ipa/handbook_downloads.htm   (532 words)

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