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Topic: Intuition (knowledge)


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 Remote Viewing and Intuition -- Part 1
Intuition as immediate knowledge of the truth of a proposition, where "immediate" means "not preceded by inference." This is a philosophically important sense, since philosophers have found it puzzling that one can have knowledge, and thus justified belief, without having made oneself aware through the process of inference of any knowledge of a concept.
Intuition as a nonpropositional knowledge of an entity - knowledge that may be a necessary condition, for, but is not identical with, intuitive knowledge of the truth of propositions about the entity.
Intuition as unjustified true belief not preceded by inference, in this (the commonest) sense "an intuition" means "a hunch." The existence of hunches is uncontroversial and not of philosophical interest.
www.biomindsuperpowers.com /Pages/Intuition.html   (5574 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Intuition
It may be remarked that Kant calls empirical intuitions our knowledge of objects through sensation, and pure intuition our perception of space and time as the forms a priori of sensibility.
Intuition alone, they maintain, is able to put us in communication with reality and give us a true knowledge of things.
According to the Ontologists, our knowledge of notions endowed with the character of necessity and universality, as well as our idea of the Infinite, are possible only through an antecedent intuition of God present in us.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/08082b.htm   (802 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Intuition
It may be remarked that Kant calls empirical intuitions our knowledge of objects through sensation, and pure intuition our perception of space and time as the forms a priori of sensibility.
Intuition alone, they maintain, is able to put us in communication with reality and give us a true knowledge of things.
Intuition (Latin intueri, to look into) is a psychological and philosophical term which designates the process of immediate apprehension or perception of an actual fact, being, or relation between two terms and its results.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/08082b.htm   (802 words)

  
 Hyponoetics - Glossary - [Intuition - 10]
In the Posterior Analytics Aristotle claims that the 'primary premises' of scientific knowledge are apprehended intuitively, and that intuition is the 'originative source of scientific knowledge' (Aristotle, 1941, 100b).
Unlike deductive knowledge it is immediate and simple, and is exemplified by the individual's 'intuition of the fact that they exist, and that they think'.
According to De anima, knowledge arises out of the abstraction of noeta from aistheta, but with the proviso that the sensible and intelligible elements thought separately do not exist separately, or in Aristotle's words, 'that the mind which is actively thinking is the objects which it thinks' (Aristotle, 1941, 431b, 18).
www.hyponoesis.org /html/glossary/intu_j.html   (1953 words)

  
 Mysticism, Metaphysics and Maritain, Chapter 1
Intuition as direct perception was to lead Maritain by way of the transparency of the concept to a deeper grasp of the primordial beginnings of metaphysics which he is here identifying with a knowledge of first principles.
The intuition of being is not just a knowledge of first principles, but it is a knowledge of being in which existence is coming to the forefront and Maritain is beginning to appreciate the subjective requirements for this kind of metaphysical seeing.
Intuition is not opposed to discourse or ratio, for discourse starts from intuition and ends in intuition, for when all is said and done, the intellect is made to see.
www.innerexplorations.com /catchmeta/mmm1.htm   (12185 words)

  
 enwe's weblog
I think that the fact that "our intuitions [are] dependent on our overall knowledge and our mental abilities" is consistent with the claim that we might legitimately "argue on the basis of intuitions." After all, one's knowledge is itself dependent on one's mental abilities, as well as on other pieces of knowledge.
Another philosopher proposes a particular case that is, intuitively, and F but not a G. If intuition is right, then the bold philosopher is mistaken.
According to Bealer, intuition is a “sui generis, irreducible, natural (i.e., non-Cambridge-like) propositional attitude that occurs episodically, […] an intellectual seeming…”.
plogworld.cubeproject.de /plog/post/119/534   (1153 words)

  
 Intuition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Intuitionism is a position in philosophy of mathematics derived from Kant's claim that all mathematical knowledge is knowledge of the pure forms of the intuition.
Intuition is by definition not the same as an opinion based on experience but may have unconsciously been formed by previous experiences.
Intuition (MBTI) is one of the four axes of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Intuition   (576 words)

  
 Intuition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Intuitionism is a position in philosophy of mathematics derived from Kant's claim that all mathematical knowledge is knowledge of the pure forms of the intuition.
Intuition is by definition not the same as an opinion based on experience but may have unconsciously been formed by previous experiences.
Intuition (MBTI) is one of the four axes of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Philosophical_intuition   (576 words)

  
 Epistemology
The reliability of intuition is then defended against Lycan’s skepticism and a response is given to Lycan’s claim that the scope of a priori knowledge does not include philosophically central topics such as the nature of consciousness.
The phenomenology of a priori intuition is explored at length (where a priori intuition is taken to be not a form of belief but rather a form of seeming, specifically intellectual as opposed to sensory seeming).
The source of self-defeat is traced to the fact that empiricism does not count a priori intuition as evidence (where a priori intuition is not a form of belief but rather a form of seeming, specifically intellectual as opposed to sensory).
spot.colorado.edu /~bealerg/epistemology.htm   (1444 words)

  
 intuition on Encyclopedia.com
René Descartes insisted that there are not two faculties of intuition (the sensual and the intellectual) but only the faculty of intellect; sensual experience, although it appears necessary in practice, is not essential to knowledge.
According to mathematical intuitionism, mathematical knowledge rests on mathematical concepts that are immediately clear and irreducible.
The Greeks understood intuition to be the grasp of universal principles by the intelligence (nous), as distinguished from the fleeting impressions of the senses.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/i1/intuitio.asp   (751 words)

  
 Swami Omkarananda: The Intuitive Experience of the Truth
Intuition is the immediate knowledge of the Absolute, obtained through the eye of wisdom, as opposed to the knowledge of the external objects derived through the exercise of the senses and the intellect.
Intuitional experience is a settled manifestation of the essential Light, and the intrinsic dynamism, of the inner self-existent Witness Consciousness, in which the ultimate ground of all existence stands self-revealed.
Without the philosophy of intuition as it is practised in the East, the philosophy of the Western world reminds us of the helpless state of the physical science before the invention of the telescope, the microscope and the other special instruments of modern science.
www.omkarananda-ashram.net /intuitive.html   (5068 words)

  
 Epistemology
The reliability of intuition is then defended against Lycan’s skepticism and a response is given to Lycan’s claim that the scope of a priori knowledge does not include philosophically central topics such as the nature of consciousness.
The phenomenology of a priori intuition is explored at length (where a priori intuition is taken to be not a form of belief but rather a form of seeming, specifically intellectual as opposed to sensory seeming).
The source of self-defeat is traced to the fact that empiricism does not count a priori intuition as evidence (where a priori intuition is not a form of belief but rather a form of seeming, specifically intellectual as opposed to sensory).
spot.colorado.edu /~bealerg/epistemology.htm   (1444 words)

  
 Kant and Mathematical Knowledge, by Thomas J McFarlane
Thus a priori synthetic judgments of empirical space are possible because all our intuitions, both pure (formal) intuitions and empirical intuitions, rest on this form of intuition; and through the science of geometry as the study of the pure intuition of space we have systematized this knowledge in a science.
Empirical knowledge (e.g.., 'it is raining') is synthetic, for it asserts more than is determined by logic and definitions alone.
The developments in mathematics in the past two hundred years have taught us some profound lessons concerning the nature of mathematical knowledge and the analytic/synthetic distinction in general.
www.integralscience.org /sacredscience/SS_kant.html   (2955 words)

  
 BOOK OF INSTRUMENTS: KNOWLEDGE AND FAITH            
'E may be skeptical about the 'apriori intuition' or 'knowledge' of a rationalist, but also about the 'empirical intuition' or 'knowledge' of an empiricist.
The idealist distinction between knowledge and faith is itself not justifiable, for given that knowledge is grounded belief and given that it need not always be based on empirical evidence (altho it may never be contrary to it), there is no place for faith in the religious, that is, supernaturalist, sense.
Propositional knowledge is true belief, but true belief need not be knowledge, because a belief may just happen to be true.
www.trinp.org /MNI/BoI/4/3/1.HTM   (2955 words)

  
 philosophy: Intuition.
Intuition is a by-product of, not the genesis of, morals, logic and knowledge.
Correct me if I'm wrong, but you seem to be appealing to some sort of genetically inferred intuition, when I would just attribute it to the passing down of knowledge and experience, through action, by raising children like their parents raised them.
Intuition, in my eyes, exists solely out of the ramifications, conclusions and experiences we have of actual events.
www.livejournal.com /community/philosophy/1255474.html   (1087 words)

  
 enwe's weblog
In her paper 'The Evidential Status of Philosophical Intuition', Janet Levin wants to answer the question, what's the status of philosophical intuitions exactly is. In order to do this, she wants to evaluate the arguments of contemporary naturalists on the one side and of champions of the so-called neo-traditionalist account on the other side.
Her goal is it to "sketch an alternative account of the role of philosophical intuitions that incorporates elements of traditionalism and naturalism".
Levin objects that it is not clear "that inquiries into the nature of knowledge, causation and belief are sufficiently analogous to inquiries into the nature of water or heat." And she considers the case of knowledge (also Kornblith's prime exmaple).
plogworld.cubeproject.de /plog/post/119/499   (711 words)

  
 Commentary Magazine - Forbidden Knowledge by Roger Shattuck
...But in either case the moral intuition that some knowledge ought to be forbidden is not easily reconciled with the philosophical intuition that we can never know sufficiently in advance which knowledge that might be...
Forbidden Knowledge opens with a question: "Are there things we should not know?"
...Part of what it means to seek a moral understanding of knowledge is to believe, finally, in the unity of truth-which is to say, in an underlying, God-given structure that makes what is intelligible and true also good...
www.commentarymagazine.com /Summaries/V102I6P70-1.htm   (711 words)

  
 Qualia: The Knowledge Argument
Frank Jackson (1982) formulates the intuition underlying his Knowledge Argument in a much cited passage using his famous example of the neurophysiologist Mary:
It is common to formulate Mary's new knowledge in terms of Thomas Nagel's famous locution of knowing what it's like: Mary does not know (while living in her black-and-white environment) what it is like to see colors and she learns what it is like to see colors only after her release.
That a person has incomplete knowledge about a certain topic does not imply without further assumptions that there is some specific fact she does not have knowledge of.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/qualia-knowledge   (8157 words)

  
 Knowledge creation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Knowledge can be divided in both tacit knowledge, which involves senses, skills and intuition, and explicit knowledge, which is formulated and/or captured.
The specific knowledge creation interaction occurs at the line between knowledge structure and anti-knowledge, which is the cutting edge.
According to this view, tacit knowledge is not knowledge at all, but collective questions that need to be assimilated into knowledge in order to be expressed.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Knowledge_creation   (272 words)

  
 Empirical knowledge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is contrasted with a priori knowledge, or knowledge that is gained through the apprehension of innate ideas, "intuition," "pure reason," or other non-experiential sources.
The vast bulk of the empirical knowledge that ordinary people possess is gained via a mixture of direct experience and the testimony of others about what they have experienced—iterated in an interesting way that is studied in the field of social epistemology as well as other fields.
For example, "all things fall down" would be an empirical proposition about gravity that many of us believe we know; therefore we would regard it as an example of empirical knowledge.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Empirical_knowledge   (447 words)

  
 Knowledge management - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A particular focus of knowledge management is knowledge which is not easily codified in digital form, such as the intuition of key individuals that comes through years of experience and being able to recognize various patterns of behavior that someone with less experience may not recognize.
Knowledge Management or KM is a term applied to techniques used for the systematic collection, transfer, security and management of information within organisations, along with systems designed to help make best use of that knowledge.
Knowledge transfer (an aspect of KM) has always existed as a process, either informally as discussions, brainstorming sessions etc., or formally through apprenticeship, professional training and mentoring programmes.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Knowledge_management   (610 words)

  
 Henri Bergson's The Creative Mind
Intuition is a form of knowledge that reality is continuous and indivisble, and that reality is always changing.
Intuition is described as a method of 'thinking in duration' which reflects the continuous flow of reality.
Intuition is not a single act, but is a fluidity of psychological action.
www.angelfire.com /md2/timewarp/bergson.html   (764 words)

  
 7asth10.txt
This simple intuition is quite distinct from intellectual knowledge, as it is distinct from the perception of the real.
Intuitions are: this river, this lake, this brook, this rain, this glass of water; the concept is: water, not this or that appearance and particular example of water, but water in general, in whatever time or place it be realized; the material of infinite intuitions, but of one single and constant concept.
Thus, it has been asserted that intuition is sensation, but not so much simple sensation as _association_ of sensations.
www.gutenberg.org /dirs/etext05/7asth10.txt   (19617 words)

  
 The Creative Mind: Intuition, Metaphysics, and Science - Kevin Morris - The Examined Life On-Line Philosophy Journal
This is not to say that both forms of intuition don’t involve a “turning inward” to direct knowledge of the mind; that is, it is incorrect to say that by adding a second form of intuition we have therefore created a third way of knowing apart from the primary intuition and the intellect.
By utilizing intuition in exploring past works, we are able to distinguish qualitative differences between component elements, thus allowing for us to separate them from the historical context (otherwise, we only think the elements in degrees of difference from the various conceptual norms of the time and not as truly novel).
In philosophical terms, intuition is often accompanied by self-evident beliefs, where a self-evident belief is one that is arrived at through intuition and “appears certain without being inferred from another belief” (Clouser 72).
examinedlifejournal.com /archives/vol2ed7/bergson.shtml   (2181 words)

  
 intuition
In philosophy, intuition is the power of obtaining knowledge that cannot be acquired either by inference or observation, by reason or experience.
Intuition- For adults the possible means of developing intuition must of necessity be different [from that for children].
Intuition is what you use to find the purpose of your life and your place in the world.
www.angelfire.com /hi/TheSeer/intuition.html   (2540 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Knowledge Article
In philosophy, knowledge is held to be a belief that is true, actionable and justified.
Early Muslim philosophy, especially the Mutazilite school, medieval Jewish philosophy, and later Christian work, especially that of Thomas Aquinas, focused on Aristotle's views.
A thread of his concern has become an entire field, the philosophy of action.
www.ipedia.com /knowledge_1.html   (1173 words)

  
 7asth10.txt
This simple intuition is quite distinct from intellectual knowledge, as it is distinct from the perception of the real.
Intuitions are: this river, this lake, this brook, this rain, this glass of water; the concept is: water, not this or that appearance and particular example of water, but water in general, in whatever time or place it be realized; the material of infinite intuitions, but of one single and constant concept.
Certainly perception is intuition: the perception of the room in which I am writing, of the ink-bottle and paper that are before me, of the pen I am using, of the objects that I touch and make use of as instruments of my person, which, if it write, therefore exists;--these are all intuitions.
www.gutenberg.org /dirs/etext05/7asth10.txt   (19617 words)

  
 parsons.txt
The primary notion of intuition is intuition of objects; intuitive knowledge rests on such intuition.
The term "intuition" is often used in philosophy for instances of this tendency of quite varying epistemic weight.
Charles Parsons Department of Philosophy, Emerson Hall, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 E-mail: parsons2@fas.havard.edu Title: Two conceptions of intuition The philosophical conception of intuition most often appealed to in earlier studies in the foundations of mathematics is derived from Kant's and shares some basic features with his.
math.ucsd.edu /~asl99/abstracts/parsons.txt   (241 words)

  
 Knowledge Creation - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch
Knowledge can be divided in both tacit knowledge, which involves senses, skills and intuition, and explicit knowledge, which is formulated and/or captured.
Knowledge Emergence: Social, Technical, and Evolutionary Dimensions of Knowledge Creation
Enabling Knowledge Creation: How to Unlock the Mystery of Tacit Knowledge and Release the Power of Innovation.
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /knowledge_creation.htm   (241 words)

  
 PragDave
Knowledge on its own is just another commodity, and commodities tend to settle in places with low costs of production.
It’s simply a manifestation of the existence of a fairly complex knowledge framework in our heads—we know what will happen when we do X because we have all the information stored somewhere in our heads, and our neurons are particularly good at parallel, associative lookup.
If we want to save our jobs, if we want to be paid more for what we do, we have to be more than knowledge workers.
blogs.pragprog.com /cgi-bin/pragdave.cgi/Practices/ValueWorker.rdoc   (577 words)

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