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Topic: Iranian blogs


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In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  Iran News, Persian Journal Iranian Farsi news & iran news paper   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Iranians are offended at the way their ancestors are portrayed in the film, inspired by the tale of 300 Spartans under King Leonidas who held out at Thermopylae against a Persian invasion led by Xerxes in 480BC.
The Iranians do have influence in the Shiite-controlled south, it's true, but that isn't the part of the country with the most serious problems.
Javad Shamqadri, a cultural advisor to Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, said it was "plundering Iran's historic past and insulting this civilization".
www.iranian.ws   (1268 words)

  
  Iranian blogs - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Blogs in general tend to be unregulated compared to other forms of expression in Iranian society.
As of October 2005, there are estimated to be about 700,000 Iranian blogs (out of an estimated total of 100 million worldwide), of which about 40,000-110,000 are active, mostly written in Farsi, the official language of Iran.
Blogs by Iranians Directory of weblogs that Iranians write in English language, either from inside or outside Iran.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Iranian_Blogs   (984 words)

  
 Spinners and Bloggers
Blogs expand the journalism of assertion exponentially, creating an environment in which stories are not expected to be fact-checked until well after their publication.
Behi is an Iranian blog, written under a pseudonym, which is critical of both the American and Iranian government.
Blogs seem to flourish in new democracies of “soft” totalitarian states, where the mainstream media is still largely biased towards the state, and blogs can organize a kind of opposition group.
web.mit.edu /comm-forum/forums/spinners_bloggers.htm   (4240 words)

  
 Jack Yan: the Persuader Blog: Iran wants to control the Iranian blogosphere
An Iranian Canadian blogger was asked to sign an apology when he went to Iran for his blog writings—and he was one of the lucky ones.
Blogs also are a good place to chat in a society where young men and women cannot openly date.
There are blogs that discuss women’s issues, and ones that deal with art and photography.
www.jackyan.com /blog/2006/03/iran-wants-to-control-iranian.html   (626 words)

  
 Freedom in Farsi blogs | Special reports | Guardian Unlimited Technology
In Iranian blogsphere you can even download hand-typed abstracts from the Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie, who was the subject of a fatwa, or death order, issued by the late Ayatollah Khomeini.
It remains to be seen for how long a small group of ageing clerics can impose their designs of a radical state on a predominantly educated society where 70% of the population under 30 has no memory of the revolution.
Iranian weblogs allow us to eavesdrop on the personal conversations of a closed society, providing a unique momentary glimpse into the inner struggles that a burgeoning young population face, the steady shift of an ideological state, and a revolution within the revolution.
technology.guardian.co.uk /online/weblogs/story/0,14024,1377538,00.html   (926 words)

  
 Dar Al Hayat   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
It appears that Hezbollah (in the Iranian sense) blogs are increasing noticeably, to the degree that their authors have organized themselves into a "Muslim Bloggers Committee," to promote their ideas and defend them against secular bloggers.
The enemies of Iran, from the neoconservatives and Israeli apologists, have made Iranian blogs a sign that there is opposition to the government of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, and there should be.
All of the blogs aren't against the government, and the fact that they are mostly authored by young people means that they don't represent all Iranians.
english.daralhayat.com /opinion/OPED/01-2006/Article-20060118-de2b77fb-c0a8-10ed-0013-5f0aeb93b88d/story.html   (1768 words)

  
 An Iranian blogs Israel | MetaFilter   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
It's worth mentioning that Hoder is not just one of the "leading voices" of Persian blogging; he's the guy who wrote the script that got Persian blogging off the ground in the first place.
The Iranian diaspora in LA for example supported a boycott of the past election (for the most part), while Hoder did not, and during this past election there are several threads with both sides argue their respective points.
Matt has created quite a blog out of MeFi too, however neither Matt nor Hoder were the first in their genre, regardless of the quality level of what they have wrought.
www.metafilter.com /mefi/48733   (1685 words)

  
 Iranian Cleric Blogs for Free Expression   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
This revolutionary action, undertaken by a very senior member of the Iranian government, is aimed at promoting an open discourse for expression, political or otherwise, in a country often deemed restrictive and undemocratic.
Blogging, an increasingly powerful tool in an internet-driven information age, has brought Abtahi in contact with his government's friends and foes alike, a valuable learning experience, he says.
TEHRAN - Blogging might not sound an appropriate hobby for a senior Iranian government official, particularly one who is a Muslim cleric.
yaleglobal.yale.edu /display.article?id=5288   (1037 words)

  
 BLOGGING IN FARSI | World War 4 Report
Alavi chooses blogs that receive the most hits, allowing the reader to taste the intellect of a majority of the population.
In a country where the state controls the media, Iranians also use their blogs as a means of real-time communication and a journalistic tool.
Iranian students, who have been protesting on and off since 1999, post notices, news and photos to their blogs, and activists write daily reports.
www.ww4report.com /node/1676   (1387 words)

  
 THE IRANIAN: Internet, Pedram Moallemian
I was later hooked on and fascinated by other Iranian bloggers, particularly those who dared to break taboos and post rather personal information on their daily lives, including notes of political dissent, romantic ventures, use of recreational drugs and even organizing to help the orphanages or mental asylums.
My blog and others like it are a way for people to connect to people, direct and almost one-on-one, often a very personal level.
One of the most popular Iranian blogs in English is Notes of an Iranian Girl that is written in less than perfect English from Tehran.
iranian.com /PedramMoallemian/2003/July/Blog   (1079 words)

  
 Censorship threat rising for Iranian blogs - On Deadline - USATODAY.com
The Iranian government's filtering and censorship of blogs "is systematically getting worse," says Hossein Derakhshan, a Canadian-based blogger who was detained and questioned during a visit to Iran last spring.
Blogs also are a good place to chat in a society where young men and women cannot openly date.
There are blogs that discuss women's issues, and ones that deal with art and photography.
blogs.usatoday.com /ondeadline/2006/03/censorship_thre.html   (500 words)

  
 [wordup] Blogs Opening Iranian Society?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Soon after Derakhshan's blog went live, he was flooded with requests from Iranians wanting to know how he managed to blog in Farsi, the Persian language spoken by Iranians.
The real leaders are still hard-line." According to "ElAheh," a 24-year-old female Iranian blogger who asked that her real name be withheld, the conservative faction of the Iranian government "doesn't understand the Internet," although some of the most fundamentalist mullahs have their own websites where they post religious teachings.
Many blogs have become bland." ElAheh particularly mourns the loss of other Iranian women's blogs with their previously open discussions about such sensitive topics as hejab, the Muslim code that specifies modest dress, and sexism in Muslim society.
lists.spack.org /pipermail/wordup/2003/000655.html   (913 words)

  
 Iranian Blogs challenge President | MetaFilter   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
December 11, 2003 8:21 PM Iranian bloggers challenge the President in the Summit: It all started from a post on the Geneva Summit's blog, DailySummit, asking Iranians to report on the Net censorship.
Then, they asked them to post their questions for the Iranian President, who was going to have a press conference.
Blogs can definitely be a big part of the answer.
www.metafilter.com /mefi/30185   (244 words)

  
 Iranian blogs debate nuclear row
Iranian bloggers are commenting extensively on the nuclear row between Iran and the West.
A significant number of bloggers seem to blame President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in particular for the crisis and suggest that he has taken Iran to the brink of war.
The sports lovers are worried that the Iranian team may be expelled from the World Cup because of the nuclear issue and Mr Ahmadinejad’s comments on Israel and the Holocaust.
www.gnn.tv /headlines/7310/Iranian_blogs_debate_nuclear_row   (458 words)

  
 'We Are Iran' :: thetyee.ca
Blogging in Iran has grown so fast because it meets the needs no longer met by the print media; it provides a safe space in which people may write freely on a wide variety of topics, from the most serious and urgent to the most frivolous.
From We Are Iran: The Persian Blogs by Nasrin Alavi.
The Iranian leaders know they are sitting on a boiling pot, you have a huge group of young people being held down by a small group religious radicals, plus many Iranians have relatives abroad and keenly feel what they are missing.
thetyee.ca /Mediacheck/2005/12/13/WeAreIran   (4314 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | Middle East | Iranian blogs debate nuclear row
Iranian bloggers are commenting extensively on the nuclear row between Iran and the West.
The sports lovers are worried that the Iranian team may be expelled from the World Cup because of the nuclear issue and Mr Ahmadinejad's comments on Israel and the Holocaust.
When the names of the two teams' players came onto the TV screen, a sentence in English was added to it as a caption: "The peaceful usage of nuclear energy is the definite claim of the Iranian."...
news.bbc.co.uk /2/hi/middle_east/4650154.stm   (914 words)

  
 Now the Iranian President Blogs! « Unspun
For those of you who wonder where this blogging phonemenon is going consider this: Iranian President Mahmood Ahmadinejad has begun blogging.
His blog is in four languages, including English.
This entry was posted on Monday, August 14th, 2006 at 4:03 am and is filed under Indonesia, blogging, News and politics.
unspun.wordpress.com /2006/08/14/now-the-iranian-president-blogs   (293 words)

  
 Bloggers of Iran
And with an estimated three or four million internet users in Iran, blogs are opening up Iranian society and culture--despite the enduring threat of government censorship and imprisonment of journalists and activists.
Behi's blog recently told us that he "enthusiastically voted for [reformist candidate] Khatami" in the 1997 elections because he and other Iranians believed "Khatami's great promises for a better society." But these promises never panned out.
As Iran Scan and all of the other individual blogs remind us, while Iran remains a closed society, a fierce debate about the country's future is underway in the blogosphere.
www.thenation.com /blogs/edcut?bid=7&pid=2947   (1243 words)

  
 OJR article: Iranian Journalist Credits Blogs for Playing Key Role in His Release From Prison
He told me the publicity helped his cause and woke up the Iranian government to a movement of bloggers in their country and abroad that would not back down when he was threatened.
He writes one in Persian, one in English, set up a directory of Iranian blogs, has done his version of group news site MetaFilter dubbed IranFilter, and set up a site to cover the Iranian government's censorship.
When I first arrived in Europe, I wrote a post on my Weblog in response to the Iranian minister for information and communication technology, Ahmad Motamedia, who said he knew nothing about my case, and then that it was not related to my Weblog.
www.ojr.org /ojr/glaser/1073610866.php   (3180 words)

  
 Toward Freedom - We Are Iran: The Persian Blogs   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In a June 2004 blog Derakhshan writes, telling his peers that they must start to write their blogs in English (as authorities constantly shut down politically sensitive blogs) in order to make noise in the Western world.
The Iranian blogs are an exercise in expression that is not allowed anywhere else in that country, and that is the primary difference and the reason why this work is so intriguing.
Iranian students, who have been protesting on and off since 1999, post notices, news and photos to their blogs and activists write daily reports.
towardfreedom.com /home/content/view/739   (1663 words)

  
 CNN.com - Iran's bloggers fear clampdown - Feb. 19, 2004
Nearly half of the Iranian parliament is critical of general elections proceeding despite the belief that they will not be free or fair.
Thousands of Iranian blogs have cropped up since late 2001 when an Iranian emigre in Canada devised an easy way to use the free blogging service Blogger.com in Farsi.
Though several English blogs outside Iran are read by Iranians, the most popular ones are in Farsi and operated inside the country.
www.cnn.com /2004/WORLD/meast/02/19/iran.blogging.ap   (897 words)

  
 Persian Blogger Chronicles :   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
During the six years that I worked as a newscaster in Iranian radio and television, one of my favorite pastimes was to read the graffiti behind several of the toilet doors, particularly one that featured works by some very interesting and colorful graffitists.
The content on many of these blogs are, like the toilet graffiti I was familiar with, superficial, emotional, inflammatory, and of course, funny.
She thinks I should find out "for whom this continuity between the practice of toilet graffiti and blogging makes sense and for whom it does not" and how the bloggers themselves explain the similarities (if they see any).
blogs.law.harvard.edu /persianblogger/2003/05/07   (448 words)

  
 Library Stuff » Blog Archives » A glance to Iranian librarianship blogs: a survey using webometrics method
Blog or weblog is one of web 2.0 attractive components which let information societies demonstrate and exchange thoughts and information easily in a flash.
Some may wonder if blogging in the library is a responsible thing to do however, blogging does offer an alternative and superior way to communicate with the patrons.
Since 2002, when weblog has been introduced to Iranian librarianship for the first time, it has been well matured amongst Iranian librarianship and flourished in 2005 and 2006, entirely.
www.librarystuff.net /2006/10/29/a-glance-to-iranian-librarianship-blogs-a-survey-using-webometrics-method   (414 words)

  
 Truck and Barter: Two Iranian blogs
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s blog Readers can see from the comments on the blogs who the Iranians consider as their role model....
Anousheh Ansari- first female tourist, first female Muslim, and first Iranian in orbit- is blogging from space.
Readers can see from the comments on the blogs who the Iranians consider as their role model.
truckandbarter.com /mt/archives/2006/09/two_iranian_blo.html   (118 words)

  
 Wired News: Blogs Opening Iranian Society?
Soon after Derakhshan's blog went live, he was flooded with requests from Iranians wanting to know how he managed to blog in Farsi, the Persian language spoken by Iranians.
So Derakhshan, a 28-year-old Iranian expatriate now living in Toronto, Canada, ported some basic blogging tools from ASCII to Unicode, enabling Iranians to blog in their own language.
According to "ElAheh," a 24-year-old female Iranian blogger who asked that her real name be withheld, the conservative faction of the Iranian government "doesn't understand the Internet," although some of the most fundamentalist mullahs have their own websites where they post religious teachings.
www.wired.com /news/culture/1,58976-0.html   (931 words)

  
 Global Voices Online » Blog Archive » Interview with Jordan Halevi, a Canadian Researcher on Iranian Blogs
Not long ago, I became intrigued with the phenomenon of Iranian blogging, and decided to conduct a bit of independent research on the topic.
A bit of preliminary research also revealed that the Iranian blogosphere was one of the largest, and fastest-growing, blogging communities on the web at the time.
The effects of blogging on Iranian society may be more subtle, and fundamentally cultural, than they are urgently political, and I think that’s something worth exploring in depth.
www.globalvoicesonline.org /2006/11/07/interview-with-jordan-halevi-a-canadian-researcher-on-iranian-blogs   (1562 words)

  
 Global Voices Online » Blog Archive » Iranian Blogs & 2005
Iranian blogs continue its dynamic existence in 2005 and Persian language has become second most used language (After English Persian ties with French) in Blogosphere.
Even though it still remains to be seen to what extent that Iranian weblogs have a “direct” impact on these events inside Iran, one fact is clear: Iranian weblogs have proven to be a critical tool for collective action and citizen empowerment.
The sense of a more inclusive and world-wide connected Iranian community through the blogosphere was barely undermined by the filtering actions of the Islamic Republic government and their restriction of access to the worldwide web in different ways.
www.globalvoicesonline.org /2005/12/27/iranian-blogs-2005   (698 words)

  
 FOXNews.com - Iranian Bloggers Find Themselves Under Attack - Technology News | News On Technology
Dozens of Iranian bloggers have faced harassment by the government, been arrested for voicing opposing views, and fled the country in fear of prosecution over the past two years.
Arash Sigarchi, an Iranian journalist and blogger, was arrested and charged with insulting the country's leader, collaborating with the enemy, writing propaganda against the Islamic state and encouraging people to jeopardize national security.
Despite the crackdown, most Iranian bloggers say the government is not interested in eliminating blogging.
www.foxnews.com /story/0,2933,189378,00.html   (1216 words)

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