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Topic: Iranian calendar


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  Iran Chamber Society: Iranian Calendar Converter
The Iranian calendar (also known as Persian calendar or the Jalaali Calendar) is a solar calendar currently used in Iran and Afghanistan.
The Gregorian calendar is the calendar that is used nearly everywhere in the world.
The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (also called "Hijri calendar") is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate Islamic holy days.
www.iranchamber.com /calendar/iranian_calendar_converter.php   (167 words)

  
  CalendarHome.com - Iranian calendar - Calendar Encyclopedia
However, before work on the new calendar was completed, Muslim Arabs overthrew the dynasty in the 7th century and with their victory, a new lunar calendar based on Islamic principles replaced the old solar calendar of the Sassanid period.
The Iranian calendar was revised in the 11th century by a panel of scientists, allegedly including Omar Khayyám.
The Iranian calendar year begins on the midnight between the two consecutive solar noons which include the instant of the Northern spring equinox, when the sun enters the northern hemisphere; in other words, the start of Spring in the northern hemisphere.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /Iranian_calendar.htm   (2147 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - Leap year - Calendar Encyclopedia
The Gregorian calendar, the current standard calendar in most of the world, adds a 29th day to February in all years evenly divisible by 4, except for century years (those ending in -00), which receive the extra day only if they are evenly divisible by 400.
The Gregorian calendar is designed to keep the vernal equinox on or close to March 21, so that the date of Easter (celebrated on the Sunday after the 14th day of the Moon that falls on or after 21 March) remains correct with respect to the vernal equinox.
The Roman calendar originated as a lunar calendar (though from the 5th century BC it no longer followed the real moon) and named its days after three of the phases of the moon: the new moon (calends, hence "calendar"), the first quarter (nones) and the full moon (ides).
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /Leap_year.htm   (1653 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Persian calendar   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The present Iranian calendar's leap day system was devised in the 11th century by a panel of scientists including Omar Khayyam, who was one of the foremost leading mathematicians and astronomers of his time, but today is well-known in the West for his poetry.
The Iranian solar calendar year begins with the midnight closest to the instant of vernal equinox, the first day of spring in the northern hemisphere.
This general picture of the Persian calendar's leap-year behaviour contrasts with other ill-informed predictive algorithms which are based on confusion between the astronomers average tropical year (365.2422 days, approximated with mistaken near 128-year cycles) and the mean interval between vernal equinoxes (365.2424 days, approximated here with a near 33-year cycle).
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/pe/Persian_calendar   (480 words)

  
 IranianHotline.com
Calendar of Events Art Exhibitions Iranian Events Outside of California
Most favorite Iranian satellite TV shows, watch online!
Association of Professors and Scholars of Iranian Heritage
www.iranianhotline.com   (350 words)

  
 Iran - Iran Info   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The present Iranian calendar's leap day system was devised in the 11th century by a panel of scientists including Omar Khayyam, who was one of the foremost leading mathematicians and astronomers of his time, but today is well-known in the West for his poetry.
The Iranian solar calendar year begins with the midnight closest to the instant of vernal equinox, when the sun enters the northern hemisphere.
This general picture of the Persian calendar's leap-year behaviour contrasts with other ill-informed predictive algorithms which are based on confusion between the astronomers average tropical year (365.2422 days, approximated with mistaken near 128-year cycles) and the mean interval between vernal equinoxes (365.2424 days, approximated here with a near 33-year cycle).
www.iranmania.com /Information/Iran_Information/Calendar.asp   (453 words)

  
 Iranian calendar Information
However, before work on the new calendar was completed, Muslim Arabs overthrew the dynasty in the 7th century and with their victory, a new lunar calendar based on Islamic principles replaced the old solar calendar of the Sassanid period.
The Iranian calendar was revised in the 11th century by a panel of scientists, allegedly including Omar Khayyám.
The Iranian calendar year begins on the midnight between the two consecutive solar noons which include the instant of the Northern spring equinox, when the sun enters the northern hemisphere; in other words, the start of Spring in the northern hemisphere.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Iranian_calendar   (2350 words)

  
 Zoroastrian Calendar - Crystalinks
The Zoroastrian calendar is a religious calendar used by members of the Zoroastrian faith, and it is an approximation of the (tropical) solar calendar.
The Zoroastrian calendar uses the Y.Z. suffix for its calendar era (year numbering system), indicating the number of years since the coronation in 632 CE of Yezdegerd III, the last monarch of the Sassanian dynasty.
In 1925, the Iranian Parliament had introduced a new Iranian calendar, which (independent of the Fasli movement) incorporated both points proposed by the Fasili Society, and since the Iranian national calendar had also retained the Zoroastrian names of the months, it was not a big step to integrate the two.
www.crystalinks.com /calendarszoroaster.html   (1463 words)

  
 Old Iranian Calendars
In the second and last reform, however, when the Y.A. calendar was officially recognized by the State and was made the civil calendar of the empire, the Gatha days were removed from the end of Adar to the end of Spandarmad, which was fixed at that time as the end of the year.
This Iranian festival which was celebrated sixty days before the summer solstice and corresponded to 24th April (Gregorian), was called maidyozarem or (roughly) the middle-point of spring in the popular (and not astronomical) sense of the word, i.e.
This is perhaps a remnant of the earliest and primitive time-reckoning of the Iranians by half-months.
members.tripod.com /zafatash/iraniancalendar.htm   (15087 words)

  
 THE PRECISE IRANIAN CALENDAR By: Dr. A. A. Jafari - (The Circle of Ancient Iranian Studies - CAIS)©
Of all the present calendars, the official Iranian calendar, based on the astronomical system, is the most scientific calendar in use and bears the names of what are known as Zoroastrian months.
This is exactly what the Iranian calendar follows: The first six months are of 31 days each, the next five months of 30 days each and the last month is of 29 days but of 30 days in the “leap” year.
Yes, the Iranians have been counting their day from midnight for, at least, 3738 years and it is the West that has adopted it very late in our times.
www.cais-soas.com /CAIS/Celebrations/precise_calendar.htm   (4102 words)

  
 Calendar :: UC Berkeley Institute of European Studies   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Iranian society is highly educated and wants to share their international culture and technologies.
The Iraq-Iran war and the dramas of the Islamic Revolution have shown that Iranian nationalism is stronger than political opposition or international Islamic policy.
Education and the knowledge of international culture and technologies are new major elements of the Iranian popular culture.
ies.berkeley.edu /calendar/archive/hourcade.html   (569 words)

  
 The unholy calendar
The two calendars are both solar and have the same length of 365 days in normal years and 366 days in leap years.
Customarily, Iranians used to have the corresponding Iranian year of 1374 as a leap year too - but it was not to be.
Luckily, for Iranians, in spite of being ruled by a stream of dictators who occasionally fancied playing with calendars (the last failed attempt was by the shah in the mid 1970s who added 1180 years to the base date to link his reign to ancient Persians), the Jalaali calendar has remained almost intact.
www.iranian.com /Feb97/Features/Calendar/Calendar.shtml   (1254 words)

  
 NOT so NEW
Bahá'’s are generally given to the misconception that their calendar was born anew for the New Era.
When the Báb based his calendar on his national calendar, it was no act of world calendar unification, such as a new 10-month calendar might be regarded, but simply an act of patriotism.
It is based on a religious calendar which was theoretically synchronized with the seasons by intercalculating a month every 120 years, but the intercalculation was not consistently followed.
www.kaweah.com /Bahai/calendar.html   (521 words)

  
 Order of Nazorean Essenes
The solar calendar reckoned from Hegira, decreed in 1925 as the official national calendar by the Parliament, is called the "government calendar" by the Ardakaanis and is only used in official correspondence and documentation.
One can imagine that the common calendar in Ardakaan is a vestige of the 'Djalali' or 'Malekshahi' calendar that was created during the reign of Sultan Djalal-al-Din Malek-Shah-e Saljuqi, probably at the instigation of Khaadjeh Nezaam-al-Mulk, by a group of astronomers and mathematicians of the period, including Omar Khayyaam and Khaadjeh Abdollah Khaazeni.
Another difference of the local Ardakaan calendar with other common calendars in the Iranian plateau, as related to irrigation, is that they start counting time from midnight, and this is not to be taken lightly.
essenes.net /astralclock.html   (4524 words)

  
 S. H. Taqizadeh: Old Iranian Calendars
On the other hand, the existence of two other old Iranian calendars is attested by the Behistun inscription, and proved by deduction from the Avestan texts.
regarding the old Iranian calendar, namely that the pre-Islamic year of Persia was a stable or fixed year beginning at (or near) the summer solstice and maintained around that point by a 120-yearly intercalation of one month.
It is a curious fact that many of the feasts connected with, and owing their origin to, the solar seasons and astronomical points of the year, have been transferred to the vague year, being detached from the tropic or fixed solar year, and attached to the civil year.
www.avesta.org /taqizad.htm   (16035 words)

  
 Iranian calendar - FarsiWeb
But this arithmetic calendar has been confirmed to produce the same results as the official Iranian calendar at least from 1925 C.E., when the calendar was officially introduced, to 2088 C.E. This is the same algorithm that is used in Mono and Microsoft's.NET (Microsoft's documentation).
The Iranian law explicitly mentions that the true solar year should be used, which requires astronomical calculations of the March equinox and the solar apparent noon.
The exact locale for observation of the apparent noon is not mentioned in the 1925 Iranian law, but the current practice is using the 52.5° E meridian, which is the meridian defining the official timezone of Iran.
www.farsiweb.ir /wiki/Iranian_Calendar   (172 words)

  
 US fighters violate Iranian air space: report
"While the objective of the fighters' violation of Iranian air space is not known yet, some military specialists believe such moves are aimed at assessing the sensitivity of the Islamic Republic's anti-aircraft defense system," the paper said at the time.
In June, Iranian naval guards seized three British boats with eight crew in the country's territorial waters in Arvand river, which borders Iraq.
Iranian military commanders have warned of grave consequences if any such attack takes place.
www.payvand.com /news/05/jan/1004.html   (623 words)

  
 Culture of Iran
This calendar was proposed earlier by prophet himself but was first systematically introduced around 638 AD, by the close companion of the Prophet and the second Caliph, Umar ibn Al-Khatab (592-644 AD).
Despite the fact that all Muslims are required to use the Islamic lunar calendar Iranians and indeed most Muslim nations for civil duties kept the old solar system to avoid never ending changes in the months and days.
This calendar is almost unknown in the West, although it is one of the most accurate, if not the most accurate in the world.
www.cultureofiran.com /calendar.php   (1692 words)

  
 THE ZOROASTRIAN CALENDAR
A religious calendar is important and necessary to sustain the beliefs and practices of any community.
In India, the Kadmi calendar is predominantly followed by the Irani Zoroastrians whose New Year always falls one month before the traditional New Year of the Parsis who, in the main, follow the Shenshai ("royalist") calendar.
This calendar was used as a basis to collect the dreaded jizya (poll tax) from Zoroastrian peasant farmers by the Muslim rulers in those days.
cobweb.ecn.purdue.edu /~bulsara/ZOROASTRIAN/calendar.html   (1435 words)

  
 Babylonian, Jewish, Muslim, Luni-Solar, Indian, Iranian Calendars
The beginning of the month in the Babylonian calendar was determined by the direct observation by priests of the young cresecent moon at sunset after the astronomical New Moon.
For a lunar calendar adjusting to the solar year, the best approximations (by continued fractions) to the difference between twelve synodic months and the tropical year would be to add one month every three years, three every eight, four every eleven, seven every nineteen, or 123 every 334.
While the religious Islâmic calendar is of course used in Irân, the ancient solar calendar also continues to be used as a civil calendar.
www.friesian.com /calendar.htm   (8375 words)

  
 Persian and Iranian Calendars at Best Iran Travel.com
There are similarity between Gregorian and solar calendar with the exception that the first 6 months of the year have 31 days, the next five have 30 days and the last month has 29 days (30 days in leap year).
Because of this difference, the gap between the solar and lunar calendar is constantly growing (33 lunar years are equal to 32 solar years).
Since the lunar calendar is based on the visibility of the new moon, there is a one day difference between the big religious festivals in Iran and in other Islamic countries.
www.bestirantravel.com /culture/calendars.html   (487 words)

  
 Norouz in the Course of History
The second calendar was the Avesta calendar which was the origin of the current Iranian calendar.
In the old Persia, the time of the king's coronation was considered the beginning of the calendar and the years were named after the kings.
Muslim Iranians light candles as a symbol of ancient Persians' respect for fire, and place the Holy Qur'an on the Norouz table to show their esteem for this divine book.
www.irna.com /occasion/norouz78/eng/history.htm   (1353 words)

  
 Nowruz - Sponsor Page Featured By IranianHotline.com
As we all know, the essence of any civilization is captured in its celebrations, for it is in these festivities that the symbols, ideas and institutions that are cherished most by the people of a nation are brought forth and renewed.
The second celebration is the Iranian New Year, Nowruz, which starts on March 21st the first day of spring and the beginning of Iranian Calendar.
Iranians, by burning fires at this time, eliminate ugliness and impurity from their lives.
www.iranianhotline.com /Norooz.cfm   (1587 words)

  
 Cultural Calendars -- The Calendar Zone
The lunar calendar was used to determine feasting or fasting days, and the solar calendar to mark the passing of days, months, and years.
Genealogy in France: Republican Calendar -- Also known as " French Revolutionaly Calendar ", this calendar was in used in France from 1793 to 1805, and 1871 (only in Paris).
Iranian calendar -- The Iranian calendar, introduced in the reign of Reza Shah Pahlavi (1925ヨ1941), modified the Islamic calendar, introducing a solar year with Farsi names for the months.
www.calendarzone.com /Cultural   (1583 words)

  
 Norouz in the Course of History
The second calendar was the Avesta calendar which was the origin of the current Iranian calendar.
In the old Persia, the time of the king's coronation was considered the beginning of the calendar and the years were named after the kings.
Muslim Iranians light candles as a symbol of ancient Persians' respect for fire, and place the Holy Qur'an on the Norouz table to show their esteem for this divine book.
web.mit.edu /mehdi_a/www/norouz84/hist.htm   (1353 words)

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