Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Iranian languages


Related Topics

In the News (Sun 23 Jun 19)

  
  Iranian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Some Iranian authors use the term "Iranian languages" in a looser, non-linguistic sense, including all languages spoken by people who regard themselves as part of the Iranian nation, or by ancient peoples whose cultures Iranians today regard as part of their national heritage.
The Old Iranian languages began to break off and evolve separately as the various Iranian tribes migrated and settled in vast areas of southeastern Europe, the Iranian plateau, and Central Asia.
Pahlavi, was the official language of the Sasanids.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Iranian_languages   (1052 words)

  
 Languages & Writing Systems
Language is a system of conventional spoken or written symbols by means of which human beings, as members of a social group and participants in its culture, communicate.
Languages of the Finno-Ugric family, such as languages of the Sami (Lapp) and Baltic-Finno groups (e.g., Sami, Finnish, and Livonian), are spoken in parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia.
The languages of North Asia are those spoken from the Arctic Ocean on the north to South Asia and China on the south and from the Caspian Sea and Ural Mountains in the west to the Pacific Ocean in the east.
www.crystalinks.com /languages.html   (2993 words)

  
 Iranian languages articles on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Iranian languages IRANIAN LANGUAGES [Iranian languages] group of languages belonging to the Indo-Iranian family of the Indo-European family of languages.
Dardic languages DARDIC LANGUAGES [Dardic languages], group of languages belonging to the Indo-Iranian subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages.
Indic languages INDIC LANGUAGES [Indic languages] group of languages belonging to the Indo-Iranian subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages.
www.encyclopedia.com /articles/06454.html   (392 words)

  
 Indo-Iranian on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Among the Dardic, or Pisacha, languages are Kafiri, spoken in Afghanistan; Khowar, current in Pakistan; Shina, Kohistani, and Kashmiri, prevalent in Pakistan and N India; and Romany, the language of the Gypsies, spoken mainly outside India.
These languages share certain distinctive phonetic characteristics, feature the use of pronominal suffixes with various verb forms, and include in their vocabularies a number of words that among the languages of India are usually encountered only in Vedic Sanskrit.
The principal modern Indic tongues include the Northwest Indic languages Punjabi and Sindhi; the central Indic languages Hindi and Urdu ; the East Indic tongues Assamese, Bengali (or Bangla), and Oriya; the West Indic language Gujarati; the South Indic tongues Marathi and Singhalese; and the northern or Pahari dialects or languages.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/I/IndoI1ran.asp   (1406 words)

  
 Iranian languages
Iranian languages are a part of the Indo European language family.
The Iranian language group is part of the larger Indo-Iranian language subfamily, and accounts for some of the oldest recorded Indo-European languages.
Indo-Iranian languages originated around modern Afghanistan, and split into the Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Dardic, and Nuristani language groups as the speakers of proto-Indo-Iranian moved west, east, and south.
encyclopedia.codeboy.net /wikipedia/i/ir/iranian_languages.html   (163 words)

  
 Indo-Iranian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Indo-Iranian language group constitute the easternmost extant branch of the Indo-European family of languages.
It consists of three groups of language: the Indo-Aryan, the Iranian and the Dardic.
According to most Aryan migration theories, speakers of the Proto-Indo-Iranian language, who referred to themselves as Aryans, settled east and south of the Caspian Sea in Northern India, Pakistan, Iran and Afghanistan.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Indo-Iranian_languages   (143 words)

  
 List of Iranian languages: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The iranian languages are a part of the indo-european language family....
The southeastern iranian languages include some 11 (sil estimate) languages and dialects spoken by about many people in asia; this language family is a part...
The southwestern iranian languages include some 16 (sil estimate) languages and dialects spoken by about many people in asia; this language family is a part...
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/l/li/list_of_iranian_languages.htm   (303 words)

  
 Iranian Languages and Literatures (CAIS)
Iranian (Aryan) languages are spoken in Iran, Iraq, Turkey, Arran (republic of Azerbaijan), Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Pakistan, China, Turkmenistan, Georgia, Russia and other scattered areas of the Caucasus Mountains.
Old Iranian, which is closely related to Sanskrit is known from the Avesta (the sacred book of Zoroastrians) and from Old Persian cuneiform inscriptions of the Achaemenid Emperors.
All Iranian languages currently spoken show a simplification of the earlier sound systems and a preference for the use of auxiliary verbs in place of the complex verb conjugations of the ancient Iranian languages.
www.cais-soas.com /CAIS/Languages/iranian_languages.htm   (190 words)

  
 EASTERN IRANIAN LANGUAGES
EASTERN IRANIAN LANGUAGES, term used to refer to a group of Iranian languages most of which are or were spoken in lands to the east of the present state of Persia.
Thus Ossetic, an Eastern Iranian language, is spoken in the Caucasus, further west than many Western Iranian languages, while Baluchi (q.v.), a North-Western Iranian language, is spoken chiefly in Pakistan, in the south-eastern corner of the Iranophone area.
While Western Middle Iranian is represented by Middle Persian and Parthian, the chief Eastern Middle Iranian languages are Khotanese (with the closely related Tumshuqese), Sogdian, Chorasmian, and Bactrian, to which one may add the remnants of such languages as Sarmatian and Alanic (R. Bielmeier in Schmitt, pp.
www.iranica.com /articles/v7/v7f6/v7f659.html   (1336 words)

  
 Languages of the World
The label language isolate is used for a language that is the only representative of a language family, as Basque or the extinct Sumerian language; the presumptive but unknown sister languages of isolates are dead and unrecorded.
The languages of seven of the nine extant branches of the Indo-European language family are spoken in Europe.
Dialects of two languages in the Indo-Iranian branch of Indo-European also are or were spoken in Europe: the Jassic dialect of Ossetic, an Iranian language, formerly spoken in Hungary; and the European dialects of Romany, which was spread by Gypsies throughout Europe and into America.
ling.lll.hawaii.edu /faculty/stampe/Linguistics/lgsworld.html   (1332 words)

  
 Iranica.com - DARDESTAÚN
The Dardic languages are an offshoot of the Indo-Aryan languages of the post-Vedic period.
Alhough Dardic languages were occasionally mentioned in travelers' notes and Christian missionaries actually published parts of the Bible in Kashmiri (in the Nagari alphabet) in the 1820s, the study of Dardic languages actually began in the 1830s, when the first professional linguistic data, in the form of compact vocabularies and glossaries, were published by M.
In the Iranian languages of the Pamirs the term for the local style of kerchief is probably a similar borrowing with relatively early phonetic transformations: Shughni-Bajuwi ce@l, Rushani-Khufi, Roshorvi c^l, Yazghulami cil (possibly from Rushani), Wakhi ±il.
www.iranica.com /articles/v7f1/v7f126.html   (3225 words)

  
 Richard Strand's Nuristân Site: Iranian-Speaking Peoples of the Hindu Kush
Munji—idGa, the language of the small Munji population in the upper Munjân Valley; The idGa dialect is spoken by Munji émigrés in Upper Chitral.
Iškâšmi—Sangleci, the language spoken around the village of Iškâšm on the Âb-e Panj (upper Oxus) and in Zêbâk and the neighboring Sanglec Valley to the south.
History: The Irânian languages stem from the speech of the northern Âryas, whose probable homelands were on the lower Volga and regions adjacent to the northern coast of the Caspian Sea, north of their linguistic cousins, the early Indo-Âryas.
users.sedona.net /~strand/Iranian/Iranians.html   (1817 words)

  
 Persian
Iranian languages are applied to a group of inter-related languages which only from linguistic point of view, share common characteristics, and not in terms of geographical and political borders.
Text: The term "Iran" is derived from three separate words throughout the history of the Farsi language: From the middle Farsi word `Eran'; from the ancient Farsi word `Ariya', and from the Avesta Farsi word `Airya', which itself is derived from the ancient Persian word `Arya'.
It comes from the adjective `ariya - raman' IRANIAN LANGUAGE Iranian languages are applied to a group of inter-related languages which only from linguistic point of view, share common characteristics, and not in terms of geographical and political borders.
imp.lss.wisc.edu /~aoliai/languagepage/iranianlanguages.htm   (388 words)

  
 Indo-Iranian Languages
This language is primarily spoken in the region of Gujarat in northwestern India, near the Pakistani border.
This is the language spoken by the inhabitants of the well-known region of Punjab, in northwest India.
This language is similar to Persian (Farsi), and it is derived from the ancient language of Avestan.
members.tripod.com /misterhaynes/indoir.htm   (2187 words)

  
 UCLA Language Materials Project Language Profiles Page
Other Iranian languages of note are Old Persian and Avestan (the sacred language of the Zoroastrians for which texts exist from the 6th century BC).
For example, it was an important language during the reign of the Moguls in Indian where knowledge of Persian was cultivated and encouraged; its use in the courts of Mogul India ended in 1837, banned by officials of the East Indian Company.
The Early Modern period of the language (ninth to thirteenth centuries), preserved in the literature of the Empire, is known as Classical Persian, due to the eminence and distinction of poets such as Rudaki, Firdowsi, and Khayyam.
www.lmp.ucla.edu /Profile.aspx?LangID=63   (1526 words)

  
 The Indo-Iranian Branch of the Indo-European Language Family   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The ancestral Indo-European language is thought to have arizen around the southern part of the Urals.
Somewhere between 4000-3500 BC some speakers of this ancestral language moved east and south of the Caspian Sea into what is now Iran, and into what is now Pakistan, India, and Afghanistan.
The Indo-Iranian Branch of the Indo-European Language Family is traditionally split into two sub-branches: the Indo-Aryan and the Iranian language groups.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/february/indoIranianBranch.html   (494 words)

  
 David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Other modern-day Iranian languages include Pashto, which is spoken in much of Afghanistan; Tajik, spoken in Tajikistan; and Kurdish, which is spoken in the Kurdish regions of Turkey, Iraq, Iran, and Syria.
In the past, there were other Iranian languages such as Avestan, the language of the Avesta, a sacred text of the Zoroastrian religion, which was the dominant religion in Iran before the Islamic conquest.
Persian is the official language of Iran and it is spoken by most of the population of over 67 million people even though it is the native language of only just over half of them.
nmelrc.byu.edu /handbooks/persian2.php   (2022 words)

  
 Indo-Iranian. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
B.C. had become the sacred and literary language of the Hindus of India, and its classical form was in use (at least for literature) until c.
The principal modern Indic tongues include the Northwest Indic languages Punjabi and Sindhi; the central Indic languages Hindi and Urdu; the East Indic tongues Assamese, Bengali (or Bangla), and Oriya; the West Indic language Gujarati; the South Indic tongues Marathi and Singhalese; and the northern or Pahari dialects or languages.
B.C. The Pahari dialects or languages are spoken by about 17 million people in the kingdom of Nepal and in parts of N India.
www.bartleby.com /65/in/IndoIran.html   (1430 words)

  
 UNESCO Collection of History of Civilizations of Central Asia : Online chapter   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
A considerable part of the population was composed of sedentary speakers of: (i) Middle and New East Iranian languages, Late Bactrian, and the New Iranian phase - the Afghan language; and (ii) West Iranian languages in the Middle Iranian and New Iranian phases – Tajik or Persian.
Of the aboriginal languages of the east of the region, the linguistically isolated Burushaski should be mentioned.
The language known as New Persian, which may usually be called at this period by the name of dari or parsi-i dari, can be classified linguistically as a continuation of Middle Persian, the official, religions and literary language of Sasanian Iran...
www.unesco.org /culture/asia/html_eng/chapitre316/chapitre1.htm   (1259 words)

  
 THE IRANIAN: News
Though his decision not to return to Rome was no doubt influenced by political events in Italy and the approach of war, an equally important motive was a new-found desire to pursue the study of Iranian languages under the guidance of W.B. Henning at the School of Oriental Studies, London University.
Gershevitch took on the daunting task of analysing the structure and development of this complex language on the basis of the fragmentary manuscript sources, completing it so successfully that his Grammar of Manichean Sogdian, submitted as a doctoral thesis in 1943 and published in 1954, remains a standard work of reference half a century later.
In preparation for teaching Avestan, the language of the earliest Zoroastrian scriptures, he began his second book, The Avestan Hymn to Mithra (1959), a work which came to be recognised as inaugurating a new era in Avestan scholarship.
www.iranian.com /News/2001/May/obit.html   (867 words)

  
 Zazaki; Its' Position Among Western-Iranian Languages - (CAIS)
Zazaki is a West Iranian language spoken in Southeast Anatolia, northwest to the Kordi (Kurdish) speaking regions, by approx.
Due to the oppressive minority and language policy of the Republic of Turkey, until 15 years ago there existed practically no indigenous Zazaki written literature, and so no means by which the Zaza people could find out anything about their own language and cultural identity[2].
At present the further development of Zazaki language and culture is endangered by the Turkish policy of „purifying“ Eastern Anatolia of its indigenous Kordi and Zaza population, as well as by the long-standing process of forced and unforced assimilation (to Turkish and Kordi).
www.cais-soas.com /cais/Languages/zazaki.htm   (1000 words)

  
 History of Pushto language
East Iranian and West Iranian (which includes Persian) are major sub-groups of the Iranian group of the Indo Iranian branch of the Indo European family of languages.
Indo-Iranian languages are spoken in a wide area stretching from portions of eastern Turkey and eastern Iraq to western India.
The variation in spelling of the language's name (Pashto, Pukhto, etc.) stems from the different pronunciations in the various dialects of the second consonant in the word; for example, it is a retroflex [sh] in the Kandahari dialect, and a palatal fricative in the Kabuli dialect.
www.afghan-network.net /Ethnic-Groups/pashtu-history.html   (976 words)

  
 Official language & dialects   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The Iranian languages and dialects are radically different from the Arabic or Turkic but were affected by the invasions of 7th and 12th Centuries.
Linguists have agreed to call the language of Darius and Cyrus Old Persian, the language of Sassanids, Middle Persian and Iran's present language "Persian", which makes it the grand child of Old Persian and the Child of Middle Persian (Pahlavi).
It's important to note that this language has kept most of its Iranian roots despite the efforts made by the Turkish and former Iraqi regime to force the Kurds to spouse the Turkish or Arabic languages.
www.daneshjoo.org /article/publish/printer_2375.shtml   (307 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.