Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Irish Volunteers


Related Topics

In the News (Fri 19 Apr 19)

  
  Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
The Irish Volunteers were formed in response to the formation of the Ulster Volunteers by Edward Carson and James Craig.
From its inception, the leadership of the Volunteers was heavily influenced by the radical Irish Republican Brotherhood.
The official stance of the Irish Volunteers was that action would only be taken if the British authorities at Dublin Castle attempt to disarm the Volunteers, arrest their leaders, or introduce conscription to Ireland.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Irish_Volunteers   (1191 words)

  
 First World War.com - Feature Articles - The Easter Rising, Dublin 1916
Hundreds of thousands of young Irish Volunteers were sent off to the trenches to fight, misguided in the belief that Ireland would be peacefully granted Home Rule by their leader John Redmond.
The famous "Castle Document", a forged note purporting that the leaders of the Volunteers were to be arrested by the British, the organisation disarmed, and Dublin to be occupied by the British Army was in fact a forgery and was "planted" on Eoin MacNeill.
In this supreme hour the Irish nation must, by its valour and discipline and by the readiness of its children to sacrifice themselves for the common good, prove itself worthy of the august destiny to which it is called.
www.firstworldwar.com /features/easterrising.htm   (3096 words)

  
 Irish Volunteers
The Irish Volunteers were a paramilitary organization established by Irish Nationalists in 1913 "to secure and maintain the rights and liberties common to the whole people of Ireland", and to enforce the imminent Home Rule Devolution.
The Ulster Volunteers were able to get away with it nevertheless, and the Irish Volunteers realized they would have to as well if they were to be a serious force.
Following the split, the remnants of the Irish Volunteers were often, and erroneously, referred to as the "Sinn Féin Volunteers", or "Shinners", after the political organization Sinn Féin The term began as a derogatory one, but soon became ubiquitous among much of the Dublin citizenry.
www.irishwolfhounds.org /volunteers.htm   (664 words)

  
 The 69th Pa Irish Volunteers
During the American Civil War, the lads of the 69th Pa Irish Volunteers fought in every campaign with the Army of The Potomac.
Today, we reenactors honor their memory by participating in living history programs, parades, gravesite ceremonies, history trips, music programs and battle recreations.
This website is dedicated to the memory of the men of the original 69th Pa Irish Volunteer regiment.
www.pa69irish.com   (107 words)

  
  Milwaukee Irish Fest - Volunteers
Irish Fest depends on nearly 4,000 volunteers of all ages each year, and each plays a very special part in our continued success.
Volunteers are needed to serve desserts, coffee and tea, clean tables, and act as cashiers.
Volunteers at Large - Volunteers at Large fill time periods or areas that may otherwise go understaffed.
www.irishfest.com /volunteers   (0 words)

  
  The Irish Rifle Volunteers of Australia and New Zealand
The Dunedin Irish R.V. became part of the 1st Bn Otago R.V. on 25th January 1886 and were disbanded on 13th September 1893.
Another Irish corps was proposed during a war scare in 1885: the Temuka Irish Rifles on 13th June 1885, but the proposal was abandoned when the government deemed it improbable that hostilities would ensue.
The 8th Union Volunteers Infantry Regiment (Irish Rifles) was re-designated NSW Irish Rifle Regiment (Volunteers) in 1903 and 1st Bn NSW Irish Rifle Regiment in 1908.
www.diggerhistory.info /pages-conflicts-periods/other/irish_rifle.htm   (1317 words)

  
  Irish Republican Army - MSN Encarta
The term IRA was later adopted by the Irish Volunteers who fought against British forces between 1919 and 1921, during the latter stages of the Irish Revolution.
The Volunteers were established in response to the formation in 1913 of the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), a paramilitary organization centered in the province of Ulster, which comprises most of what is now Northern Ireland.
Conversely, the Irish Volunteers were dedicated to ensuring that home rule was established as a first step toward their primary goal: the creation of an independent Irish republic.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761575144/Irish_Republican_Army.html   (1184 words)

  
  Science Fair Projects - Irish Volunteers
The Irish Volunteers (Óglaigh na hÉireann) were a paramilitary organization established by Irish Nationalists in 1913 "to secure and maintain the rights and liberties common to the whole people of Ireland", and to enforce the imminent Home Rule Act.
The Volunteers were formed in response to the formation of the Ulster Volunteer Force by Edward Carson and James Craig the same year.
Following the split, the remnants of the Irish Volunteers were often, and erroneously, referred to as the "Sinn Féin Volunteers", or "Shinners", after the political organization Sinn Féin.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Irish_Volunteers   (1086 words)

  
  Irish Volunteers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Irish Volunteers (Óglaigh na hÉireann) were a paramilitary organization established by Irish Nationalists in 1913 "to secure and maintain the rights and liberties common to the whole people of Ireland", and to help enforce the imminent Home Rule Act.
The Volunteers were formed in response to the formation of the Ulster Volunteer Force by Edward Carson and James Craig the same year.
The political stance of the remaining Volunteers was not always popular, and a 1000-strong march led by Pearse through the garrison city of Limerick on Whit Sunday, 1915, was pelted with rubbish by a hostile crowd.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Irish_Volunteers   (1083 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Irish Volunteers   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Irish nationalists groups feared the arming of the Ulster Volunteers in April 1914, seeing it to be a move that would not only undermine efforts to free Ireland from direct British control but also one that could actively repress independence movements.
In answer to this the Irish volunteers used the same loophole and in July 1914 the nationalist Erskine Childers landed 900 rifles from Germany at Howth, seven miles from Dublin and was greeted by 800 volunteers who had turned out to receive their weapons..
The Irish Volunteers were a paramilitary organization established by Irish Nationalists in 1913 "to secure and maintain the rights and liberties common to the whole people of Ireland", and to enforce the imminent Home Rule Act.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Irish-Volunteers   (2391 words)

  
 Irish Volunteers - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Irish Volunteers   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Irish national defence force formed at the Rotunda, Dublin, on 25 November 1913 to defend the principle of home rule.
The Volunteers had played an important role in securing legislative independence in 1782, and their name still evoked strong memories in the 1910s.
Infiltrated by the nationalist Irish Republican Brotherhood, the Irish Volunteers became embroiled in the plans for the 1916 Easter Rising to overthrow British rule.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Irish+Volunteers   (337 words)

  
 The Irish Volunteers, Ireland, July 1914
Fostered by a growing sense of nationalism the Irish Volunteers included a woman's arm and a youth movement and became increasingly prominent in the struggle that was Irish politics of the time.
Irish nationalists groups feared the arming of the Ulster Volunteers in April 1914, seeing it to be a move that would not only undermine efforts to free Ireland from direct British control but also one that could actively repress independence movements.
In answer to this the Irish volunteers used the same loophole and in July 1914 the nationalist Erskine Childers landed 900 rifles from Germany at Howth, seven miles from Dublin and was greeted by 800 volunteers who had turned out to receive their weapons..
www.thewarriorirish.com /pages/volunteers.html   (210 words)

  
 Irish Volunteers - InformationBlast
The Volunteers were formed in repsonse to the formation of the Ulster Volunteer Force by Edward Carson and James Craig the same year.
As the Volunteers returned to Dublin, however, they were met by a large patrol of the Royal Irish Constabulary and the British Army.
Following the split, the remnants of the Irish Volunteers were often, and erroneously, referred to as the "Sinn Fein Volunteers", or "Shinners", after the political organization Sinn Fein.
www.informationblast.com /Irish_Volunteers.html   (893 words)

  
 National Volunteers - Definition, explanation
The National Volunteers is the name taken by the group of the Irish Volunteers that sided with Irish Parliamentary Party leader John Redmond after the group split in the wake of the question of the Volunteers' role in World War I.
While Redmond took no role in the creation of the Irish Volunteers, when he saw how popular they had become he realized an independent body of such magnitude was a threat to his authority as leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party, and therefore sought control of the organization.
Secondly, he reminded the Irish Volunteers that when they returned after an expected short war at the end of 1915, they would be an armed army capable of confronting the outcome of the partition bill forced through by Sir Edward Carson, leader of the Ulster Unionists, as an ammendmment to the Home Rule Act.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/n/na/national_volunteers.php   (1008 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Irish Republican Army
Physical force Irish republicanism as an ideology had a long history, from the United Irishmen of the 1798 and 1803 rebellions, to the Young Irelander Rebellion of 1848 and the Irish Republican Brotherhood rebellion of 1867.
The Irish Volunteers split, the National Volunteers, with over 100,000 members led by Irish Parliamentary Party leader John Redmond were prepared to accept British promises to deliver Home Rule and about 20,000 of them served in the war in the British Army.
In theory, the IRA was responsible to the Dáil and was the army of the Irish Republic.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Irish_Republican_Army   (5314 words)

  
 Irish Volunteers - Politics.ie Wiki
Following the split, the remnants of the Irish Volunteers were often, and erroneously, referred to as the "Sinn Féin Volunteers", or "Shinners", after the political organization Sinn Féin.
The Easter Rising was a failure, and large numbers of the Irish Volunteers were arrested, even ones that did not participate in the Rising.
With the election and establishment of the First Dáil, individual units of the Volunteers began, on their own initiative, to target members of the Royal Irish Constabulary in their vicinity, thereby invoking in a slapdash manner the War of Independence.
www.politics.ie /wiki/index.php?title=Irish_Volunteers   (513 words)

  
 Irish Republican Army information - Search.com
However the term Irish Republican Army in its modern sense was first used in the second decade of the 20th century from the merger of the Irish Volunteers and the Irish Citizens Army after the Easter Rising.
The Irish Volunteers split, the National Volunteers, with over 100,000 members led by Irish Parliamentary Party leader John Redmond were prepared to accept British promises to deliver Home Rule and about 20,000 of them served in the war in the British Army.
In theory, the IRA was responsible to the Dail and was the army of the Irish Republic.
www.search.com /reference/Irish_Republican_Army   (5626 words)

  
 Irish Volunteers Information
As the Volunteers returned to Dublin, however, they were met by a large patrol of the Dublin Metropolitan Police and the British Army.
Following the split, the remnants of the Irish Volunteers were often, and erroneously, referred to as the "Sinn Féin Volunteers", or "Shinners", after Arthur Griffith's political organization Sinn Féin.
The political stance of the remaining Volunteers was not always popular, and a 1000-strong march led by Pearse through the garrison city of Limerick on Whit Sunday, 1915, was pelted with rubbish by a hostile crowd.
www.bookrags.com /Irish_Volunteers   (1060 words)

  
 War, Neutrality And Irish Identities, 1939-1945
But most of the southern Irish volunteers were Catholic and together with their protestant compatriots they were representative of the social, political and religious diversity of Irish society.
One met the joke often…that what the Irish were doing dare not be told because the facts would embarrass both the Belfast Government who wished the world to believe their people were in the war, and Mr de Valera who wanted the Southern Irish to believe they were out of it.
Within that framework the volunteers could be lauded as heroes who made a significant contribution to the allied cause, a not to be forgotten Irish dimension of the anti-fascist struggle during the Second World War.
www.reform.org /TheReformMovement_files/article_files/articles/war.htm   (4267 words)

  
 Irish Northern Aid, Inc./Irish History Overview
The Irish resisted strongly and it was not until 1601 in the reign of Elizabeth I of England that the Gaelic system of law and organization was broken.
The Irish Volunteers became the Army of the Republic, under the Ministry of Defense and pledging its allegiance to Dail Eireann.
Three mayors of Irish cities, all members of the IRA, were killed by the British; martial law was declared through nearly half of the country; streets, shops and factories in many towns were burnt to the ground; there were executions in prisons and torture in internment camps.
www.inac.org /irishhistory   (2206 words)

  
 JCS Archive: The Volunteers of '82
The Volunteers of Grattan's time broke up without having consolidated their legislative victory, owing to their leaders' faith in the promises of English statesmen just as the Volunteers of our time were disorganised by the fact of their leaders trust in the promises of English statesmen.
But we cannot see that the present leaders of the Irish Volunteers can at all be compared to the crowd of aristocratic, clerical and capitalist reactionaries who steered the Volunteers of '82 to their destruction.
Irish traditions, Irish heroes, Irish martyrs for freedom, all, all were alien to them, and therefore their betrayal by their leaders was not in their eyes a national betrayal, but only an aristocratic defection in a struggle of two parties within the British Empire.
www.wageslave.org /jcs/archive/160108b.html   (991 words)

  
 The Wild Geese Today -- Living History
The largest group of Irish living historians in reenacting, the Irish Volunteers Battalion, is on its way to Gettysburg for the landmark 135th Anniversary reenactment of the greatest battle in American history.
In summary, wherever the Irish of the Union army fought at Gettysburg, there will be the Irish Volunteers Battalion to carry on their memory and ensure that their actions are not forgotten.
Irish Volunteers Battalion camps will be campaign-style (no tents) in the woods, in a fashion similar to the way the real soldiers at Gettysburg lived during those terrible three days in July 135 years ago.
www.thewildgeese.com /pages/dispatch.html   (2335 words)

  
 Irish Volunteers in the Second World War Canadian Journal of History - Find Articles
Each chapter is a collection of war stories, some short and some long, which describe the services of Irish volunteers in almost every theatre of operations: since most of these stories end with a medal being awarded, it soon becomes clear that the Irish fought as bravely as any Allied soldiers.
For one thing, Irish Volunteers in the Second World War does not really stand alone: it was written as a companion volume to another, similar work, Irish Men and Women in the Second World War, by the same author.
As it stands, while Irish Volunteers in the Second World War is a success on its own limited terms, Doherty's work is ultimately not much more informative than a roll of names on a monument of stone.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_qa3686/is_200412/ai_n13244049   (979 words)

  
 History News Network
First, the difficulties entailed by Irish participation in the war should not be allowed to obscure the moral and political issue confronting the country.
The amorality of Irish wartime neutrality was summed up by de Valera's infamous visit to the German ambassador in Dublin in April 1945 to present his condolences on the death of Hitler.
Second, while the case for maintaining Irish neutrality in the early years of the war was very strong, it made less sense as the war progressed.
www.hnn.us /roundup/entries/5984.html   (865 words)

  
 ::James Connolly::
The Irish Citizens Army was created to protect the workers from any groups that might have been employed by the employers to ‘rough up’ any striking worker.
During the war, the majority of the Irish Volunteers supported John Redmond, leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party, who supported the government in London and its war aims.
These people were the more radical side of the Irish Volunteers who were furious that Redmond, having pushed for a Home Rule Bill, now accepted that it could not come into being until the war was over.
www.historylearningsite.co.uk /james_connolly.htm   (1344 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.