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Topic: Irish morphology


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  Irish language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Irish (Gaeilge), a Goidelic language spoken in the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom, Canada and the USA, is constitutionally recognised as the first official language of the Republic of Ireland.
Irish is given recognition by the Constitution of Ireland as the first official language of the Republic of Ireland (with English being a second official language), despite the limited distribution of fluency among the population of that country.
Munster Irish is spoken in the Gaeltachtaí of Kerry (Contae Chiarraí), Muskerry (Múscraí), Cape Clear (Oileán Cléire) in the western part of County Cork (Contae Chorcaí), and the tiny pocket of Irish-speakers in An Rinn near Dungarvan (Dún Garbháin) in County Waterford (Contae Phort Láirge).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Irish_language   (5619 words)

  
 Irish morphology -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The morphology of (The Celtic language of Ireland) Irish is in some respects typical of an (The family of languages that by 1000 BC were spoken throughout Europe and in parts of southwestern and southern Asia) Indo-European language.
Irish (A word that can be used to refer to a person or place or thing) nouns, (A word that expresses an attribute of something) adjectives, and the definite (Nonfictional prose forming an independent part of a publication) article are discussed on the page on (additional info and facts about Irish nominals) Irish nominals.
Irish (A word that serves as the predicate of a sentence) verbs are discussed at (additional info and facts about Irish verbs) Irish verbs.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/i/ir/irish_morphology.htm   (782 words)

  
 Irish morphology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The morphology of Irish is in some respects typical of an Indo-European language.
Other aspects of Irish morphology, while typical for a Celtic language, are not typical for Indo-European, such as the presence of inflected prepositions and the initial consonant mutations.
Irish nouns, adjectives, and the definite article are discussed on the page on Irish nominals.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Irish_morphology   (636 words)

  
 Online Encyclopedia and Dictionary - Irish language
Irish (Gaeilge in Irish) is a Goidelic language spoken in Ireland and in small communities in Canada and Argentina.
Irish is constitutionally recognised as the first official language of the Republic of Ireland, and has recently received a degree of formal recognition in Northern Ireland, under the Good Friday Agreement alongside the varieties of Lowland Scots spoken in Northern Ireland.
The independent Irish state from 1922 (The Irish Free State 1922-37; Éire from 1937, also known since 1949 as the Republic of Ireland) launched a major push to promote the Irish language, with some of its leaders hoping that the state would become predominantly Irish-speaking within a generation.
fact-archive.com /encyclopedia/Irish_language   (3865 words)

  
 Irish language
Irish (Gaeilge) is a Goidelic language spoken in Ireland.
Irish has recently received a degree of formal recognition in Northern Ireland, under the Good Friday Agreement alongside the varieties of Scots spoken in Northern Ireland.
Munster Irish is spoken in the Gaeltachtaí of Kerry (Ciarraí), Coolea (Cúil Aodha) in the western part of County Cork (Contae Chorcaí), and the tiny pocket of Irish-speakers in An Rinn near Dungarvan (Dún Garbháin) in County Waterford (Contae Phort Láirge).
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/i/ir/irish_language.html   (3633 words)

  
 Irish language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Munster Irish is spoken in the Gaeltachtaí of Kerry (Ciarraí), Coolea (Cúil Aodha) in the western part of County Cork (Contae Chorcaí), and the tiny pocket of Irish-speakers in An Rinn nearDungarvan (Dún Garbháin) in County Waterford (Contae Phort Láirge).
Irish political leaders, such as Daniel O'Connell (Dónall Ó Conaill), too were critical of the language, seeing it as 'backward', withEnglish the language of the future.
The independent Irish state from 1922 (The Irish Free State 1922-37; Éire from 1937, also known since 1949 as the Republic of Ireland) launched a major push to promote the Irish language, with some of itsleaders hoping that the state would become predominantly Irish-speaking within a generation.
www.therfcc.org /irish-language-14585.html   (3374 words)

  
 Why Choose Irish Inflectional Morphology
Some may argue that Irish is a dead  language, but  if all of the country’s official documents are published in both Irish and English, there must be some need to hold on to our native language.
Morphology is the area of linguistics, which attempts to describe the regularities in word structure.
Two-level Morphology represents a word as a correspondence between a lexical level, which represents a simple concatenation of morphemes making up a word, and the surface level, which represents the actual spelling of the final word.
www.compapp.dcu.ie /~away/PROJ3/00-01/tlynn.html   (2449 words)

  
 A Separate Standard for Ulster Irish?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Irish is quite happy to add several strong plural suffixes one after another, and it is neither odd nor uncommon to hear colloquial triple plurals such as paróistíochaí ”parishes” (paróiste ”parish” followed by plural —í, another plural —acha, becoming, according to contemporary orthography, -ocha after a long /í/, and, finally, another —í).
The concept of what is idiomatically Irish seems also to have equated natural, native idiom with a sustained assault of cryptic folkloristic expressions and (not always quite digested) idioms at the reader, every single wording having been deliberately chosen not to bear the slightest resemblance to its English equivalent.
A syntactic trait especially typical of non-native Irish is the usage of ag to signify the agent of an autonomous verb, arising from the tendency of non-native learners to equate Irish autonomous verbs with English passives.
www.geocities.com /faolchu.geo/ulster-standard.html   (6470 words)

  
 Irish language Article, Irishlanguage Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Munster Irish is spoken in the Gaeltachtaí of Kerry (Ciarraí), Coolea (Cúil Aodha) in the western part of County Cork (Contae Chorcaí), and the tiny pocket of Irish-speakersin An Rinn near Dungarvan (Dún Garbháin) in County Waterford (ContaePhort Láirge).
Irish political leaders, such as Daniel O'Connell (Dónall Ó Conaill), too were critical of the language, seeing it as 'backward',with English the language of the future.
None of the recent taoisigh(plural of 'Taoiseach', meaning 'prime minister') have been fluent in Irish, of the recent Presidents only Mary McAleese (Máire Mhac Ghiolla Íosa) and Mary Robinson /Máire Mhic Róíbín are fluent, though the latter studied the language to improve her fluencywhile in office.
www.anoca.org /ireland/english/irish_language.html   (3551 words)

  
 Fethard Launch of Irish Historic Towns Atlas: No. 13 Fethard
Photographed at the launch of 'Irish Historic Towns Atlas, no. 13, Fethard', in the Abymill Theatre, Fethard, on Friday 7th February are L to R: Terry Cunningham (chairman Fethard Historical Society), Michael Ryan (President, Royal Irish Academy).
The diffusion of the atlas project of Ireland is dated initially to a conference 'Irish towns and medieval Europe' held at University College Dublin in 1978.
By 1981, after I presume many meetings, the Council of the Royal Irish Academy had agreed to publish the atlas in its constituent fascicles and the government agreed to pay funds for the employment of a cartographic editor.
www.fethard.com /reports/fethard_atlas_launch1.html   (1292 words)

  
 Research Interests
Critical and historical approaches to Modern Irish literature (from Early Modern Irish to the 20th century).
The Irish language, its literature and nationalism (late 19th to early 20th centuries).
Translation of the Old Testament in Irish under the direction of William Bedell and its reception/adaptation in Ireland and Scotland.
www.tcd.ie /Irish/irww2.htm   (109 words)

  
 Morphology
It is in their morphology that we most clearly see the differences between languages that are isolating (such as Chinese, Indonesian, Krewol...), ones that are agglutinating (such as Turkish, Finnish, Tamil...), and ones that are inflexional (such as Russian, Latin, Arabic...).
Irish (and other Celtic languages, such as Gaelic, Welsh, and Breton) are unusual in that it is the consonants that change in various situations, rather than the vowels.
In Irish, for example tá (to be) becomes an bhfuil in questions.
www.ship.edu /~cgboeree/morphology.html   (3697 words)

  
 Cathal Doherty   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Early Irish verbal morphology is notoriously complex in that verbs distinguish two sets of endings for most tenses and moods, the use of which varies with syntactic context: i.e.
Finally, although Old Irish is generally a strict VSO language (as is Modern Irish), many residues of an earlier V2 stage remain, e.g.
In sum, the proposal that the conjunct paradigm of Old Irish verbs indicates the projection of CP has considerable evidence in its favor and provides the basis for an explanation of a broad range of seemingly unrelated facts.
www.ling.upenn.edu /Events/PLC/plc23/doherty.html   (810 words)

  
 American Ethnic Geography Bibliography Part 5
Mannion, John J. Irish Settlements in Eastern Canada: A Study of Cultural Transfer and Adaptation.
Marston, S. "Neighborhood and Politics: Irish Ethnicity in 19th Century Lowell, Massachusetts." Annals of the Association of American Geographers 78 (1988): 414-432.
Vinyard, Jo Ellen M. The Irish on the Urban Frontier.
www-ssl.valpo.edu /geomet/geo/courses/geo200/bib6.html   (1724 words)

  
 LINGUIST List 3.352: Eclipsis in Irish
Sean Day writes concerning eclipsis in Irish, the initial consonant mutation process whereby voiced stops become nasals, voiceless stops and /f/ become voiced, and vowels are preceded by /n/.
This is pretty certain because, in addition to the fact that some of the instances of Irish eclipsis still involve nasalization (i.e., those involving initial /b, d, g, V/), several of the conditioning environments for eclipsis correspond to conditioning environments for the nasal mutation in Welsh.
There must presumably be many studies of Irish dialects that include discussions of eclipsis and its distribution, but unfortunately, I don't know anything about that.
www.sfs.nphil.uni-tuebingen.de /linguist/issues/3/3-352.html   (447 words)

  
 LINGUIST List 3.541: Double Morphology, Irish Speakers   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Double morphology seems to be more systematic in English with agentive nouns derived from verb+particle, mentioned by Valentine, Davis, and Bauer: putter oner tracker downer blower upper Koontz cites examples of double inflection from Omaha-Ponca (Siouan), where the first and second agent is often marked twice, e.g.
This is of course the case in English, too: sisters-in-law, putter-on (?) are irregular in that the morphology is "in the wrong place".
I don't propose to throw out this very important notion, but perhaps it is not an absolute constraint, but rather a "preference principle" that can be overridden by other principles if it is in conflict with them.
www.ling.ed.ac.uk /linguist/issues/3/3-541.html   (203 words)

  
 Ling 001 Morphology   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
: anything that a language does with morphology, it usually can also do with syntax; and there is always some other language that always the same thing with syntax.
There is a web feature at Slate magazine devoted to "Bushisms", many if not most of them arising from his apparent problems with English morphology.
derived by this type of morphology take on a life of their own, and often change in meaning.
www.ling.upenn.edu /courses/Spring_2001/ling001/morph_infl.html   (2153 words)

  
 How do you translate this phrase?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Ask for Irish Gaelic translations on this English to Gaelic, Gaelic to English translator forum.
Irish language translations given on this voluntary community site cannot be guaranteed to be correct.
I can however guarantee that it is grammatically correct and conforms with Irish morphology.
www.irishgaelictranslator.com /translation/ftopic5245.html   (1442 words)

  
 Dorothy Disterheft's homepage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Irish complementation: a case study in two types of syntactic change, Historical syntax, ed.
Purpose and consecutive in Irish, Ériu 36.107-23 (1985).
The diachronic relationship of morphology and syntax, Papers from the VIIth International Conference on Historical Linguistics, ed.
www.cas.sc.edu /ling/faculty/disterheft/disterheft.html   (707 words)

  
 Project Ideas   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
This project will develop a User Interface to an Irish morphology engine, to enable it to be used for CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning) purposes.
The project will aim to develop tools that could be used to assess the language ability of Irish language skills in primary school in an unintrusive and pedagogically sound manner.
The proposed domain for this project is the Irish vocabulary of primary school children in 3rd class (approx 7-8 year olds).
www.compapp.dcu.ie /~mward/projects/projects02.html   (1032 words)

  
 GuruNet — Content Map
Irish Minister for the Co-Ordination of Defensive Measures
Irish Minister for the Environment, Heritage and Local Government
Irish Minister of State at the Department of the Taoiseach
www.gurunet.com /cm-dsid-2222-letter-1I-first-10651   (79 words)

  
 Irish Gaelic Lessons   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The Morphology of Irish Gaelic Nouns Basically discussing the differences in nouns, pronouns, and the articles.
Whether or not indefinitie articles exist in the Irish Gaelic language, and what variations there are in form.
well i am doing a project in irish on gaelic football and i seriously need help translating different things and don't have much help.
www.irishgaelictranslator.com /lessons/author-.html   (456 words)

  
 jtm's info file   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
Specifically, the development of a model of the language learner usable by a CALL package to provide a consistently challenging and interesting learning experience.
An ongoing project is the development of a description of the morphology of Irish usable by a computer to produce the language.
I've been learning Irish for a while, and am currently studying Old Irish (not to mention Latin and Old English as well).
www.ceantar.org /jtm/jtm.html   (251 words)

  
 Dienekes' Anthropology Blog: February 2003 Archives   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
A dental morphology investigation of post-Neolithic South Asian population history, AAPA Abstracts, 2003) reports that there is no support for the Aryan Invasion Theory, or the Out of India model.
The dental morphology evidence of 1,451 individuals from living and prehistoric populations instead suppor the Early Intrusion Model with a substantial break occurring between 6000 and 4500BC
H.J.H. Edgar (Prediction of social race category using characteristics of dental morphology, AAPA Abstracts, 2003) reports that dental morphology can be used to predict social race with upwards of 90% probability
dienekes.ifreepages.com /blog/archives/2003_02.html   (6048 words)

  
 Untitled Document   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-12)
The morphology of Irish towns: Part 2 - the Anglo-Norman network Pat Dargan
Deprivation and affluence in rural Ireland: the case study of Tahilla, Co. Kerry David Storey
The morphology of Irish towns: Part 3 - the Plantation towns of Ireland Pat Dargan
www.iol.ie /~agti/articles.htm   (162 words)

  
 University of Arizona Linguistics Department, UA Linguistics Department, UofA Linguistics Deparment, Official Website
The VIST group is looking into the universal properties of these languages, with a particular focus on such issues as expletive structure, the structure of nominals and copular constructions, empty categories, resumptive pronouns and synthetic agreement patterns, as well as case and ergativity.
The VIST group meets on a semi-regular basis, and is currently applying for NSF support for a large scale typological study.
Sheila Dooley Collberg, Lecturer, (Ph.D. Lund, 1991) Typology, Structure of NPs and DPS, Irish, Maori.
linguistics.arizona.edu /research/syntax_vist.php   (411 words)

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