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Topic: Irish phonology


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  Irish Gaelic
Irish (Gaeilge nah Eireann) is a Celtic language spoken mainly in Ireland.
Irish is a compulsory subject in government funded schools in the Republic of Ireland and has been so since the early days of the state.
Irish first began to appear in writing in the form of Ogham inscriptions starting in approximately the 3rd century A.D. No similar script is found anywhere in Europe, and the very name for it, Old Irish ogham, a non-Celtic word, shows that it was probably inherited from the early inhabitants of the British Isles.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/january/Irish.html   (1468 words)

  
  Irish language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Irish (Gaeilge), a Goidelic language spoken in the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and the USA, is constitutionally recognised as the first official language of the Republic of Ireland.
Irish is given recognition by the Constitution of Ireland as the first official language of the Republic of Ireland (with English being a second official language), despite the limited distribution of fluency among the population of that country.
Munster Irish is spoken in the Gaeltachtaí of Kerry (Contae Chiarraí), Muskerry (Múscraí), Cape Clear (Oileán Cléire) in the western part of County Cork (Contae Chorcaí), and the tiny pocket of Irish-speakers in An Rinn near Dungarvan (Dún Garbháin) in County Waterford (Contae Phort Láirge).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Irish_language   (5564 words)

  
 Irish spelling.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
While studying Irish language pedagogy, he researched language revitalization at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and was awarded a PhD from the National University of Ireland in 1995 for a dissertation on language revival.
During the classical Irish period, 1200-1600, a standardized literary language flourished among the literati of the era, the poets and professional scholars, who were supported by literary families and chieftains.
The phonological variants in Irish are considerable and are attributable to the existence of three separate dialects, roughly corresponding with geographical distribution, canúint an Tuaiscirt 'northern dialect' in the northwest region, canúint an Iarthair 'western dialect' in the western region of Co.
www.spellingsociety.org /journals/j22/irish.php   (4093 words)

  
 Irish phonology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The phonology of the Irish language varies from dialect to dialect.
The processes discussed here reflect a somewhat idealized version of "school Irish" that tends to be used by teachers outside of the Gaeltacht areas.
The distinction between velarized "broad" consonants and palatalized "slender" consonants is phonemic in Irish.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Irish_phonology   (1069 words)

  
 Research Interests
Professor McManus is Director of the Irish Scottish Academic Initiative 'Bardic Poetry' project (funded by the HEA).
The Irish language, its literature and nationalism (late 19th to early 20th centuries).
Translation of the Old Testament in Irish under the direction of William Bedell and its reception/adaptation in Ireland and Scotland.
www.tcd.ie /Irish/irww2.htm   (109 words)

  
 Irish language
Irish (Gaeilge) is a Goidelic language spoken in Ireland.
Munster Irish is spoken in the Gaeltachtaí of Kerry (Ciarraí), Coolea (Cúil Aodha) in the western part of County Cork (Contae Chorcaí), and the tiny pocket of Irish-speakers in An Rinn near Dungarvan (Dún Garbháin) in County Waterford (Contae Phort Láirge).
The independent Irish state from 1922 (The Irish Free State 1922-37; Éire from 1937, also known since 1949 as the Republic of Ireland) launched a major push to promote the Irish language, with some of its leaders hoping that the state would become predominantly Irish-speaking within a generation.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/i/ir/irish_language.html   (3633 words)

  
 Irish language --  Encyclopædia Britannica   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
As one of the national languages of the Republic of Ireland, Irish is taught in the public schools and is required for certain civil-service posts.
Many Irish writers or their families fought in the civil wars and against the British, and their experiences were reflected in their writing.
In Irish names the prefixes are O'-, as in O'Brien, and Mc- or Mac-; the Norman-French is Fitz-, (derived from the French fils), as in Fitzgerald; and the Welsh Ap-, as in...
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9042776   (819 words)

  
 Hiberno-English: The English Language in Medieval Ireland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
For instance, rather than merely suggest that word initial h is indicative of Irish aspiration, Hickey maintains that it is indicative of the grammatical rules of Irish that place an h in "he third person singular feminine of the possessive pronoun in the plural of nouns"(226).
The Irish affixation of h to English words such as able, oak and old, suggests a confusion among Anglo-Irish writers as to when and where in English the ungrammatical h is affixed to words.
There is evidence for both Irish influence and for English innovation in the Kildare poems, a fact which suggests that the writers were native Irish speakers attempting to use a standardized form of English in composing the only creative Anglo-Irish work of the period.
www.chass.utoronto.ca /~cpercy/courses/6361mcglynn.htm   (1327 words)

  
 Irish language Article, Irishlanguage Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Munster Irish is spoken in the Gaeltachtaí of Kerry (Ciarraí), Coolea (Cúil Aodha) in the western part of County Cork (Contae Chorcaí), and the tiny pocket of Irish-speakersin An Rinn near Dungarvan (Dún Garbháin) in County Waterford (ContaePhort Láirge).
The independent Irish state from 1922 (The Irish Free State 1922-37; Éire from 1937, also known since 1949 as the Republic of Ireland) launched a major push to promote the Irish language, with some of itsleaders hoping that the state would become predominantly Irish-speaking within a generation.
None of the recent taoisigh(plural of 'Taoiseach', meaning 'prime minister') have been fluent in Irish, of the recent Presidents only Mary McAleese (Máire Mhac Ghiolla Íosa) and Mary Robinson /Máire Mhic Róíbín are fluent, though the latter studied the language to improve her fluencywhile in office.
www.anoca.org /ireland/english/irish_language.html   (3551 words)

  
 School of Celtic Studies - The Irish of West Muskerry, Co. Cork: a phonetic study
E 2.1: The Irish of West Muskerry, Co. Cork: a phonetic study
At present Irish as the native language is confined mainly to parts of the parishes of Ballyvourney, Inchigeelagh, Clondrohid, and Kilnamartery.
The Irish spelling employed is, as a rule, based on that of classical or Early Modern Irish.
www.celt.dias.ie /publications/cat/e/e2-1.html   (829 words)

  
 Irish phonology -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The (A speech sound that is not a vowel) consonant inventory of Irish is shown in the chart below.
The distinction is (additional info and facts about phonemic) phonemic in Irish.
An Irish word normally has only one stressed syllable, namely the first one: capall 'horse'; seoltóir 'sailor'; siopadóir 'shopkeeper'.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/i/ir/irish_phonology.htm   (1067 words)

  
 ILES   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Her research has focused primarily on various aspects of the Irish language, from syntactic structure to dialect development and text analysis.
Her most recent research interests have centered around the structural consequences of language contact in Ireland and its effects on Irish, including the patterns of assimilation of borrowed vocabulary into Irish, of code-switching between English and Irish, and of contact-induced syntactic change.
She has also studied contact phenomena in other languages, as well as the maintenance of Irish among immigrants in North America and the language attitudes of these individuals.
www.iles.umn.edu /nancy_stenson.htm   (353 words)

  
 VIEW ROA 196
This dissertation is an examination of the prosodic structure of the closely related Goidelic languages: Irish, Scots Gaelic, and Manx.
It is shown that the WSP has had a recurring effect on the prosodic development of Old Irish from Proto-Insular Celtic and on the evolution of Old Irish into Middle and Early Modern Irish, and thence to the modern Goidelic languages.
It is further argued that a prosodic constituent called the colon must be included in the prosodic hierarchy between the prosodic word and the foot, with evidence from both Goidelic and non-Goidelic languages that certain facts of stress and prosodic size cannot be explained adequately without reference to the colon.
roa.rutgers.edu /view.php3?roa=196   (459 words)

  
 Irish language
Munster Irish is spoken in the Gaeltachtaí of Kerry (Ciarraí), Muskerry (Múscraí) in the western part of County Cork (Contae Chorcaí), and the tiny pocket of Irish-speakers in An Rinn near Dungarvan (Dún Garbháin) in County Waterford (Contae Phort Láirge).
Modern Irish has only one diacritical sign, the acute (á é í ó ú), known in Irish as the síneadh fada, or simply fada.
None of the recent taoisigh (plural of 'Taoiseach', meaning 'prime minister') have been fluent in Irish, of the recent Presidents only Mary McAleese (Máire Mhac Ghiolla Íosa) and Mary Robinson/Máire Mhic Róíbín are fluent, though the latter studied the language to improve her fluency while in office.
www.askfactmaster.com /Irish_language   (3746 words)

  
 CELT: The online resource for Irish history, literature and politics
Dillon, Myles, `Vestiges of the Irish dialect of east Mayo', Celtica 10 (1973) 15-21
Watkins, Calvert, `The etymology of Irish dúan', Celtica 11 (1976) 270-77
Dillon, Myles, `The Irish settlements in Wales', Celtica 12 (1977) 1-11
www.ucc.ie /celt/celtica.html   (8922 words)

  
 Gaeilge ar an Ghréasán   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Irish language in education in the Republic of Ireland - tuarascáil le Mercator
The Irish language in education in Northern Ireland - tuarascáil le Mercator
Canúintí na Gaeilge · The dialects of Irish le Antony Green...
www.smo.uhi.ac.uk /gaeilge/gaeilge.html   (2258 words)

  
 THE GOLD RING CD & BOOK STORE - BOOKS, CELTIC LANGUAGES
The early Irish linguist : an edition of the canonical part of the Auraicept na n-âeces with introduction, commentary, and indices.
The Irish language in the Republic of Ireland, 1983 : preliminary report of a national survey.
The Irish Language in Northern Ireland : The Politics of Culture and Identity.
www.goldring.org /GOLDWB17.HTM   (1037 words)

  
 Montserrat Creole - an Irish brogue?
In phonology, it is true that there are several important characteristics in which Montserrat Creole (MC) agrees with popular Southern Irish English (IE).
This one exception, this one clear instance of undoubted Irish influence in the lexicon, and a word restricted as far as I know to Montserrat, is /ménsha/ or /ménshan/, meaning 'young female goat'.
Of the vaunted 'soft Irish brogue' the Emerald Isle of the Caribbean retains barely the tiniest trace.
www.phon.ucl.ac.uk /home/wells/brogue.htm   (2288 words)

  
 LINGUIST List 11.1403: Irish Phonology/Speech Synthesis   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
1 studentship in Irish phonology; 1 studentship in speech synthesis Two funded research studentships are currently available within a collaborative project between the Departments of Lingusitics and Computer Science in University College Dublin, Ireland.
The first candidate will assist in the formalization of Irish phonology for use in a non-linear phonological model.
A working knowledge of Irish and some familiarity with basic phonological theory are required.
www.ling.ed.ac.uk /linguist/issues/11/11-1403.html   (212 words)

  
 Frederik Kortlandt: Bibliography
phonology: 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 14, 16, 57, 125, 130, 207
The Old Irish absolute and conjunct endings and questions of relative chronology.
I: Language change and phonology [Journal of Indo-European Studies, monograph 30] (1999), 246-248.
www.kortlandt.nl /bibliography.html   (2474 words)

  
 IR32520 - MODERN IRISH (LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE) 3+4   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Language classes on Irish dialects, phonology, morphology, and on standard Irish.
Literary studies of the twentieth-century Irish novel, and the development of the autobiography in Irish.
You will be able to hold an extended conversation in Irish with confidence.
www.aber.ac.uk /modules/2002/IR32520.html   (120 words)

  
 Canadian English
Furthermore, a similar pattern is also seen in Scottish and Irish English, both of which may have had a substantial influence on the Nova Scotia and Ottawa varieties of Canadian English.
So while the question of who brought the pattern to southern Ontario (and ultimately to western Canada) is hard to answer, historical linguists do agree on one thing: that the pattern is a fossil of the Great Vowel Shift that occurred in England in the 15th and 16th centuries.
It is believed that the diphthong-raising pattern is inherited from certain middle-English dialects in which the lowering of [i:] and [u:] stopped at the mid-vowel height in some words.
www.ic.arizona.edu /~lsp/Canadian/canphon3.html   (1557 words)

  
 Welcome Page - Department of Modern Irish, UCD
The Irish language is the single most important and treasured component of Ireland's native heritage.
With over three hundred students and a dozen staff members the Modern Irish department of University College Dublin is among the largest university departments in the world devoted to the study of the Irish language, its literature and its culture.
Students are encouraged to avail of the departmental Language Laboratory as an important part of the development of their oral communication skills.
www.ucd.ie /gaeilge/failte/modern_irish.html   (546 words)

  
 Acquisition of Irish as a First Language (Insealbhu na Gaeilge Mar Chead Teanga)., O Baoill, Donall P., Ed.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Acquisition of Irish as a First Language (Insealbhu na Gaeilge Mar Chead Teanga)., O Baoill, Donall P., Ed.
Abstract: The results of ongoing research on the acquisition of Irish as a first language are presented in this collection of four papers from a 1991 seminar and a fifth paper specially commissioned for this volume.
The study of Irish syntax is of particular interest because of its contribution to the ongoing search for a Universal Grammar.
ericae.net /ericdb/ED357643.htm   (135 words)

  
 calendar
He will be discussing some of his current work on sociolinguistic variation in Irish English phonology.
The International Corpus of English (ICE) project was started in the early 1990s with the aim of compiling corpora of national Englishes in countries where English is a majority first language or an official additional language.
In addition to these methodological problems, ICE-Ireland provides data on questions such as the relation between 'standard' English and traditional dialect, variability in auxiliary patterns and negation, and the use of quotative verb forms such as GOES and BE+LIKE in modern Ireland.
students.washington.edu /sling/archive.htm   (494 words)

  
 Gaeilge   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Among books, I'd recommend Noel McGonagle's Basic Irish Grammar (ISBN 1-900693-98-4, Cló Iar-Chonnachta, 1988, 1991).
It simply gives you the information, with a few examples, and doesn't pad it out.
Emacs lisp that modifies Emacs capitalisation functions to understand the Irish uru.
www.cb1.com /~john/languages/gaeilge.html   (145 words)

  
 LINGUIST List 3.68: Clusters
> An epenthetic vowel between /l/ or /r/ is also very common in many dialects of both Irish and Scots Gaelic, and may perhaps be the source of the Hiberno-English phenomenon.
It just occurred to me: when I was learning Gaelic years ago from cassettes, I noticed that the tutor pronounced "arm" as "arrem", which I understood as influenced from Gaelic.
The film -> fillum cluster break-up in Hiberno Irish is part of Irish phonology that seems to have been borrowed into English.
www.ling.ed.ac.uk /linguist/issues/3/3-68.html   (340 words)

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